The Quietus' Scores

  • Music
For 915 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Led Zeppelin II [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Lulu
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 16 out of 915
915 music reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a work of music that seismically shifts in front of your ears. Melodies form crystalline shapes that grow, morph and solidify under a haze of generative ambience. Some of those ideas laid down on Get Lost have taken shape as an LP, designed to play through from start to finish.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a deliberate Difficult Listen, an Atrocity Exhibition, an Intense Humming Of Evil. If you've always been a Stewart-skeptic, there's a good chance you'll dismiss this as Super Hans conjuring a powerful sense of dread; if not, it's likely to genuinely unsettle.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At her brightest and her best.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Temples then. A bit retro--check. Noel Gallagher and Johnny Marr likes them--check. Singer has amazing hair--check. A debut album chock full of references to their sources, but elegantly reformed and futureproofed--check.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The mastery of Moodymann is its ability to consider and celebrate a rich cultural past whilst simultaneously providing a localised image of what an intimate, cathartic and utopian electronic music could look like.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the Tinariwen formula may be familiar, Emmaar sees their sound refined without losing any of the group's rebel edge and defiant spirit.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While the record as a whole rewards revisit, the excitement concerning its many idiosyncrasies inevitably levels off. And yet, that initial pang of shock never fully subsides.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Instead of trying to recapture the magic of their formative years, Hatori and Honda have written and produced a meta-comeback record about the impulses that inspire artists to reunite.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a piece of surrealism and absolutely beautiful to listen to.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Progression is a great thing to hear in any artist's work, and there's plenty of that to the largely excellent Burn Your Fire. Yet its louder moments at the minute seem mostly in place to provide contrast, with Olsen remaining at her most engaging when speaking to you in whispers.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    St. Vincent's real genius is the way it manages to project an aura of perfection while simultaneously showing us its guts; it suggests that while the polished surface may not be a lie, exactly, it's based on a series of elisions that we're all uncomfortably complicit in.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a far more reflective affair, with the lyrical gymnasium packed away
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For scope alone, Deathconsciousness feels important, but it also makes the band's new music sound contented and unfussy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its confident shape-shifting compositional power and instrumental thunder make for one of 2014's most immediate and satisfying releases.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hood and Mike Cooley, the only original members left, handle all of the songwriting for the first time since the band's 1998 debut, and it makes for a unity of vision that prevents the grief from sounding gratuitous, that makes the uncertainties resonate with our own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a boldly contemporary record whose wily 70s spirit isn't lost amid the fuzz.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Boy
    Boy confirms that Bozulich is at least as good as Cave or Waits at contemporising the blues, at crafting bold, gritty, assertive art that is enchantingly oddball yet still accessible, not to mention infinitely rewarding.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Take Off And Landing Of Everything is the sound of a band prising an encouraging aesthetic edge from the sheer enjoyment of ageing. It bodes well for the future.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Lost In The Dream and his band The War On Drugs, Adam Granduciel has made an incredibly strong case that his heroes should now be considered his peers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The menace and late-night melancholy is subbed for outright tragedy and romance here, and this is certainly their best realised set released in the decade since Black Earth's high watermark, bringing together all that makes this music both beautiful and ugly, while tentatively exploring new sonic territory.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As much as Mess is a drive further across electronic borders Liars explored in 2012 with WIXIW, it is simultaneously a consolidation of all that has come before.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chills On Glass has been sequenced, so that there are gaps between the songs big enough to drive a huge tour bus through, but each nugget is such an alien blast that you need a break to re-evaluate what just lubed past your lobes
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In rock, rehashing the past more often than not results in music that sounds anachronistic, but Unfidelity is proof that in electronic music, a disregard for technological progression can still result in a forward-looking album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the beauty of My Krazy Life, which manages to break the homogenous mould of the majors by retaining an unshakeable sense of local identity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Two
    Two sounds like Owls really ought to in 2014--as melancholic and complex as they've always been whilst expanding their sound as a second album should.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Singles [is] the first of their albums that really forces the repeat button; as good as In Evening Air and On The Water are, they're so emotionally draining that you don't exactly find yourself in a hurry to play them again right away.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a rare Morrissey record in which the music matters as much as the words. Mercifully, this reissue does what no Moz re-package has yet managed, and respects the integrity of the original.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] wonderful record.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is enlightening, wry and devastating, but most of all, it's life-affirming.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all their three-pronged power and musical fluidity, Unwound didn't, perhaps, quite make music which transcended the genres, styles and subcultures it was associated with.... If nothing else, this two-hour compendium of righteous, often superlative noise demonstrates that they could also cater to dancin' feet, and ears looking to be bled like radiators.