Metascore
75

Generally favorable reviews - based on 25 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 25
  2. Negative: 0 out of 25
  1. 200 Million Thousand showcases some of their most satisfying [tunes] yet.
  2. 90
    They arise triumphant with their own footprint in the soil of rock and roll. [Winter 2009, p.91]
  3. On Black Lips' fifth studio album 200 Million Thousand, their music finally catches up with their live-show notoriety. The surf-rock riffs are woozier, the girl-group melodies are brighter, and the in-the-red production channels extra psych-rock paranoia.
  4. No holds barred, and no pitch-correction in sight, the tracks of 200 Million Thousand shine like diamonds in the rough, warts-and-all.
  5. 80
    This great LP is best seen as their Desert Island Discs, a statement of things the band can't do without. [May 2009, p.79]
  6. 80
    Fortunately, buried beneath the Lips' psychedelic slop heap are surprisingly exacting pop hooks, clever musical experiments, and insidious grooves that belie the band's wastrel image.
  7. Apparently they're nowhere near as wild as they once were, but their fifth album still sounds convincingly reprobate.
  8. Black Lips are able to both faithfully emulate some annoyingly nearly-recognisable sixties and seventies styles while using the one-take demo approach to give their own 3 chord song structures an air of immediacy that prevents the album from sliding too quickly into the pit marked “slavish recreation.”
  9. Grimy and disheveled, clever and infectious, it's a sloppy heap of classic pop, psychedelic haze, spastic rock, and teenage disaffection mixed to lo-fi imperfection in some kid's filthy garage.
  10. 200 Million Thousand has more hooks and is better top-to-bottom than any previous Black Lips effort.
  11. Here they make less of an effort to conceal the pop smarts percolating beneath the slop-rock surface; catchy little gems like 'Starting Over' and 'I'll Be with You' help make this the most satisfying Black Lips album yet.
  12. On 200 Million Thousand, Black Lips sidestep expectations and make a record less approachable than its predecessor.
  13. Yes, there are jokes and doo-woppy moments of light-heartedness, but this is a soupy, stoned, distressed-sounding album at odds with the Lips’ image as the world’s premier party band.
  14. Detractors will point to a failure to effectively up their game with 200 Million Thousand but the sly sense of craft remains.
  15. 70
    Black Lips make the same album over and over. If that album sucked, this might be a problem. But it doesn’t.
  16. 70
    Very simplistic in melody and progression, each track on 200 Million Thousand is a tube-driven, distorted mess, complete with classic Brit-punk vocals. Twangy and overdriven guitars are matched with screams and pissed-off vocals full of attitude, creating a highly energetic punch, reminiscent of a Black Lips live performance.
  17. 200 Million Thousand provides a fair share of these moments and because of that you can say the album succeeds. It just could use a little more teenage head and a little less brains.
  18. The result is a gleefully presented disaster. One that's consistently captivating if not irresistible.
  19. The guitars are rough and the lyrics mumbled, but even the most rote garage tunes betray a craftsmanship often missing from the genre. The collection is the Lips' first that would have benefited from some trimming.
  20. It is not The Great Black Lips Record many were expecting. But it doesn’t disappoint either.
  21. 200 Million Thousand falls somewhere between a riot and a soundtrack for a Sunday drive, too big for the garage but not quite ready for India, either.
  22. 60
    For once, such a retrogressive and deconstructive approach is strangely thrilling. [May 2009, p.104]
  23. Pithy stompers such as 'Short Fuse' and 'Drugs' tell their own story, but the spooked death rattle of 'The Drop I Hold' is at least proof that the experimental mind-set of 2007's " Good Bad Not Evil" wasn't a one-off. [May 2009, p.107]
  24. This smart if self-conscious album makes it clear who the Lips would like to be, but it's hard to tell who they really are.
  25. It means that the album’s instantly accessible and familiar to anyone who’s ever smoked a cigarette, flipped the bird to The Man or nailed the pastor’s daughter in the churchyard; but is subject to the law of diminishing returns which kicks in every time the fuck-you teen persona is reincarnated.
User Score
8.5

Universal acclaim- based on 10 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. CiroM
    Apr 26, 2009
    8
    They are doing some smart rock n roll. This should be recognized.
  2. Walk
    Apr 8, 2009
    8
    I didn't like this album at first. I love the black lips and thought that good bad etc. was a great album. This isn't the same thing as that. It's a different album altogether, but good in it's own right. "Elijah" is great, the "drop i hold" is hard as shit and the secret track at the end is also very good. Take my advice, give this album a go. Full Review »
  3. hj
    Feb 25, 2009
    10
    Only band that matters!