Butterfly House - The Coral
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 8 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 8
  2. Negative: 0 out of 8
  1. 80
    The Coral don't put a foot wrong on this album, and therein lies its one flaw: by polishing their technique and perfecting their craft, they've become slightly less interesting. [Aug 2010, p.81]
  2. Despite being a guitarist down (Bill Ryder-Jones departed after Roots and Echoes), they've regrouped admirably and made a comeback record that strives for, and indeed almost reaches, the dizzying heights of 2002's self-titled debut.
  3. Once cosmic scallies dazzled by pop's sepia-tinted past, Butterfly House is proof that The Coral;s psychedelic pop is now just as beautiful. [Aug 2010, p.118]
  4. This is without doubt the band's most mature work to date, and perhaps they're most polished too, thanks to some excellent production work, but Butterfly House still has no respect for convention and shows little interest in becoming a straightforward pop record.
  5. The present glut of aspiring British bands has never more seemed like an expanse of flotsam adrift on the seas of pop culture. The Coral's Butterfly House exists as a welcoming aural paradise--though, thankfully, not an Oasis.
  6. It's all very "nice" but only sporadically truly vital.
  7. Slowly but surely, the Coral are learning how to sound both mature and mercurial.
  8. That the results are as modest as Butterfly House is a disappointment, though all the skillful pieces remain in place.
User Score
7.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 5 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 3
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 3
  3. Negative: 0 out of 3
  1. Dec 2, 2010
    7
    An excellent effort by The Coral who, I must confess, I had lost interest with in recent years. Butterfly House was a pleasant surprise. TheAn excellent effort by The Coral who, I must confess, I had lost interest with in recent years. Butterfly House was a pleasant surprise. The songs are tight, the arrangements flowery at times but not afraid to cut loose. A joyous listen! Full Review »
  2. Oct 10, 2010
    9
    It doesn't matter what you're sound is like, if the songwriting isn't there, you'll never make a great record. On 'Butterfly House' the CoralIt doesn't matter what you're sound is like, if the songwriting isn't there, you'll never make a great record. On 'Butterfly House' the Coral have mastered both the art of the atmospherics and the art of writing a great pop tune. It is easy to identify the influence of John Leckie here, and his use of reverb and spacing allows for the Coral to keep true to their 60s psychedelic influences. There's a lot that will remind you of Stone Roses debut album, both in terms of sound and structure, but enough originality that you will instantly notice this as a Coral record. There is a distinctly more mature sound on this record, one that you could sense forming on Roots and Echoes. The difference here, however, is the greater creativity with sound effects, and a more dynamic sonic structure. The absence of Bill Ryder-Jones is evident as the riffs aren't quite as complex or central in the tracks, but they are no less creative and Paul Duffy does an adequate job taking over lead guitar duties. The rhythm section sounds as tight as ever, and the croon of James Skelly (perhaps an overused term to describe his vocal style, albeit very accurate), sings some of his more imaginative lyrics since Magic and Medicine. With its crescendo and hair raising bridge, opener 'More Than A Lover' is the real standout track that seems to make your soul want to jump out of your body. No less urgent and beautiful are 'Butterfly House' and '1000 Years' which both set a new bar for atmospherics. With their jangly yet catchy chord progressions, these two tracks are destined to be the most listened to numbers on the record. 'Green is the Colour' and 'Fallin All Aroudn You' show that the Coral can tone things down a bit, but keep their imagination, and the best sleeper track on the record goes to 'Walking in the Winter' a beautiful, breezy acoustic number that is possibly one of the most catchy things they've written since 'In the Morning'. The record boasts some very lovely harmonies, both on vocals and with the guitars. It is a very pleasant record to listen to both at the start and at the end of your day, and it reaches out to a wide range of emotions or mental states. There really is little to critique here, at lease in my opinion. Some people will chastise this record for losing the fun and twisted ideas that were more prevelant on the first three records, but 'Butterfly House' is the sound of a band understanding how to create distinct moods out of beautifully written songs, and at the end of the day, what more could you want from a record. I've rarely gone a week without listening to it multiple times since obtaining a copy, and I think most Coral fans will feel the same. Full Review »
  3. Mar 19, 2012
    6
    Im a critical bugger. When The Coral get it right they alternate between making me smile and sing along. This album does neither. However, itIm a critical bugger. When The Coral get it right they alternate between making me smile and sing along. This album does neither. However, it does possess an aural grab. A "polished" production, reminiscent of what Walter Becker did to China Crisis on Flaunt The Imperfection. Theyve grown up in a way, giving us a more "adult" album...maybe one for a fathers day present. Especially if that father liked a mix of The Byrds and The Kinks Id suggest. Full Review »