Cope - Manchester Orchestra
Cope Image
Metascore
70

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics What's this?

User Score
8.2

Universal acclaim- based on 11 Ratings

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  • Summary: The fourth studio release for the Atlanta-based indie rock band was produced with Dan Hannon.
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 18
  2. Negative: 0 out of 18
  1. 90
    Cope is a loud dose of poetry which I can see stretching its musical arms very far and very wide.
  2. Mar 31, 2014
    80
    Though it unfortunately eschews the dynamic emotive crests and space of past efforts in favor of MO's intensely urgent intent, its results make it a completely worthy addition to an already strong alt-rock catalog. [May 2014, p.89]
  3. Apr 23, 2014
    80
    The infinitely superior Cope might expand their reach further still. [May 2014, p.114]
  4. 70
    Sustained power and little in the way of variety can make for quick fatigue, but at just 38 minutes long Cope has hooks and energy to spare.
  5. Apr 4, 2014
    60
    There are big, well-crafted hooks on the Oasis-y "The Mansion" and the melancholy slow-burner "Indentions," though they're often stuck in clunky arrangements and muddy self-production.
  6. 60
    Eight tracks straight of gut-punching, emotive arena rock can be exhausting--especially when it leans so heavily on emo aesthetics.
  7. Apr 23, 2014
    40
    [A] set of exhilarating if unrelenting Weezeresque thrash pop. [May 2014, p.96]

See all 18 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 2 out of 2
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 2
  3. Negative: 0 out of 2
  1. Apr 10, 2014
    10
    If you are looking for an album to blast while working out or preparing to battle to the death then this is the album for you. Atlanta rockers Manchester Orchestra return with their 4th full length album and there is no surprise here, it is awesome.

    Layered guitar tracks smash through every track with unquestionable authority while Andy Hull's voice/beard leads the charge with never ending vigor. This album may lack the soft and desperately pleading melodies from Virgin, the complexity and personal depth of METN, and the hauntingly beautiful crescendo of children's choruses and orchestral string sections of Simple Math....but it makes up for all of that by melting your **** face off. Is it the same album as previous full length records? Absolutely not, and why would you want the same record again. Cope is not a creative flowering of a band maturing... It is a straightforwaed, wild, and unrelenting statement of "we do whatever we want".

    Make no mistake, Manchester Orchestra is fully capable of bringing the strengths and successes of the other albums back in full force whenever they so choose- the beauty of recording on your own label is that nobody forces you to make that "next album" a certain way.

    Cope has no master, certainly not the likes of you.
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  2. Apr 10, 2014
    9
    Sporting thick guitars from top to bottom, Cope is an unrelenting rock album from a band known for it's intense live performances. This album feels like an attempt to bottle their live sound; an ambitious undertaking that is accomplished reasonably well. Weezer and QOTSA come to mind a number of times; however Cope is still as original as Manchester Orchestra itself, with a rawness and lyrical bravery all too uncommon in typical rock albums. Cope is also difficult to categorize. Hull has held true to his lyrical roots with a distinctive indie feel, cloaking a pounding album which never stops to catch it's breath. This is the Manchester Orchestra prophesied by Simple Math's 'April Fool' and 'Virgin', fans hoping to relive the slower and more soulful yearning of previous tracks like 'I Can Feel a Hot One' or 'Leaky Breaks' will be sorely disappointed. Far less duplicitous than it's predecessors, Cope is a decided rock album coupled with Hull's typically deconstructed and honest lyrical flair. To my ear Cope is one of the best rock albums 2014, and that's no April fool. Expand