Eat Me, Drink Me

  • Record Label: Nothing
  • Release Date: Jun 5, 2007
Metascore
63

Generally favorable reviews - based on 23 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 23
  2. Negative: 2 out of 23
  1. Forget what you know about this guy and it'll come off like a decent, and rather efficient, little goth-pop record.
  2. The songs and Ziggy guitar solos are more accessible than usual. Manson can croak like an undead, but can't sing to save his life.
  3. Uncut
    60
    Musically, affairs lack Manson's customary anthemic poise, but tracks like "Heart-Shaped Glasses" draw on Berlin-era Bowie and Iggy's The Idiot with brooding panache. [Jul 2007, p.107]
  4. It's not his best effort, but it's the perfect mood setter for your midnight absinthe and auto-erotic asphyxiation party.
  5. Spin
    60
    [It] scales back the Weimar guignol of 2003's The Golden Age of Grotesque in favor of classic industrial and glam. [Jul 2007, p.98]
  6. It's a modernized version of Marilyn Manson: heavier guitar, a touch of neo-thrash, and some metalized Bravery-style new-wave pop.
  7. Despite some spooky background noises, the music leans toward a glam-gone-grim style, reverting to a sound that predates Marilyn Manson’s past industrial-rock stomps.
  8. Billboard
    50
    There are only a couple of songs with enough impact to avoid boring people who catch the band on tour this summer. [9 Jun 2007]
  9. The results are too often less-than-inspiring, and our Marilyn’s music has not established the sort of consistency required to atone for this lack of drama.
  10. Mercifully, this album shouldn’t even be a footnote – it’s no nadir, for sure, but it sure isn’t any good.
  11. Put simply, this is B-Movie rock: from the death rattle vocals, to the clichéd riffs and hackneyed subject matter.
  12. He has spectacularly failed to make an album that has any bite.
User Score
7.0

Generally favorable reviews- based on 124 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 46 out of 68
  2. Negative: 15 out of 68
  1. EmaA.
    Jul 10, 2007
    10
    I think Manson is a true artist. This album is a proof of his staying true to his feelings and state of mind. He's not making any I think Manson is a true artist. This album is a proof of his staying true to his feelings and state of mind. He's not making any compromise. He's telling his story, this time with other words and notes and that's what being creative means. He's different (but why should he be the same?), he's alive, more alive than so many. Art is about movement and change. I really appreciate this movement and change in the alternation of rough and soft sound and lyrics. They may not be perfect from a specialist point of view (I'm not one), but you can feel his artistic torments, he's giving his best. Chapeau! :) Full Review »
  2. JennerB.
    Sep 7, 2007
    8
    It's not as accessible on first listen as his past albums have been, but I think that's the point. This is definitely an album you It's not as accessible on first listen as his past albums have been, but I think that's the point. This is definitely an album you have to listen to a few times to have it fully sink in and then it's easier to appreciate it for what it is. It's art, not disposable pop music. Full Review »
  3. BL
    Aug 7, 2007
    8
    Definitely a good album, as long as you are not expecting an industrial/metal album. I felt the last album (Golden Age...) tried a few new Definitely a good album, as long as you are not expecting an industrial/metal album. I felt the last album (Golden Age...) tried a few new things but mostly tried to recreate the Antichrist Superstar sound, to mixed results. This album goes off in another direction and succeeds because of it. Definitely worth a listen. Standout tracks are: If I was Your Vampire, Evidence, Mutilation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery, You and Me and The Devil Make Three. Full Review »