Fate

User Score
8.8

Universal acclaim- based on 25 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 22 out of 25
  2. Negative: 1 out of 25

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  1. EliC
    Apr 8, 2009
    3
    Well, after loving their first two albums, I was very disappointed to learn that Dr. Dog have now discovered computerized pitch correction. (And they seem the enjoy using it. A lot.) Gone are the realistic lazy harmonies of their previous releases that really sounded like there were 3 guys right in the room with you, trying their best to hit the notes, and coming just close enough to make Well, after loving their first two albums, I was very disappointed to learn that Dr. Dog have now discovered computerized pitch correction. (And they seem the enjoy using it. A lot.) Gone are the realistic lazy harmonies of their previous releases that really sounded like there were 3 guys right in the room with you, trying their best to hit the notes, and coming just close enough to make it work. Listening to "Fate" is more like a computer is in the room with you, synthesizing artificially-perfect vocals with perfectly-tracked drums. The sound is entirely too polished to make the whole vintage thing work. Tube amps are appropriate. Teen-pop production sparkle is like, so not. The songwriting lacks something as well. I'd never wanted to skip a Dr. Dog song before this album. Expand
Metascore
72

Generally favorable reviews - based on 23 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 23
  2. Negative: 0 out of 23
  1. Whether or not Dr. Dog can duly revered based on their own merits remains to be seen, but in the meantime, they've got a ringer on their hands. [Aug 2008, p.170]
  2. 70
    Even as they take on the album title's potentially heavy theme, two vocalists sing with wide-open smiles, and they toss in new-wave beats alongside the saloon pianos and tube-amp guitars. [Aug 2008, p.84]
  3. 93
    What Dr. Dog and its principal songwriters McMicken and Toby Leaman have done is carry on a tradition of soulful writing and musicianship. [Summer, 2008, p.90]