User Score
6.6

Generally favorable reviews- based on 21 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 21
  2. Negative: 4 out of 21

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  1. Oct 16, 2012
    10
    This may be one of my favorite Tori Amos albums to date. Beautiful song choices. The emotion behind the songs are increadable. I was disappointed when I first found out it was an album of reworkings but I can not sstop listening to it. Why did i think Tori would disappoint, she never does.
  2. Nov 5, 2012
    8
    It is necessary to listen several times to find the true sense: the song "Marianne" (which for me went unseen in the album "Boys for Pele"), has an outstanding interpretation also thank the impulse that gives the orchestra. The same goes for "Flying Dutchman", "Maybe California" and "Cloud on my tongue". The songs that fewer caught my attention are "Snow cherries from France" and "GoldIt is necessary to listen several times to find the true sense: the song "Marianne" (which for me went unseen in the album "Boys for Pele"), has an outstanding interpretation also thank the impulse that gives the orchestra. The same goes for "Flying Dutchman", "Maybe California" and "Cloud on my tongue". The songs that fewer caught my attention are "Snow cherries from France" and "Gold dust", the would replace by the "Caught a lite sneeze" and "Spring haze" for saying some of the tori-pieces. Expand
Metascore
68

Generally favorable reviews - based on 13 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 13
  2. Negative: 0 out of 13
  1. Dec 4, 2012
    80
    The tunes sound lustrous but Amos, the singer and writer, sounds richer. [No. 93, p.53]
  2. Nov 29, 2012
    80
    The orchestral setting tempers the mannered vocal tics of some originals and proves transformative. [Dec 2012, p.96]
  3. Oct 22, 2012
    40
    Often the orchestra feels under-used on what, for the most part, are some disappointingly inert reinterpretations. [Nov 2012, p.89]