Metascore
70

Generally favorable reviews - based on 19 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 14 out of 19
  2. Negative: 0 out of 19
  1. May 24, 2011
    83
    Boris has evolved a lot over the past decade, and the album is far less raw and furious than its 2002 namesake.
  2. Jun 28, 2011
    80
    Superior, though, is Heavy Rocks, the group's second release to go by that name. [Jul 2011, p.79]
  3. May 26, 2011
    80
    Inscrutable concept aside, the new Heavy Rocks doesn't so much redefine heavy music as reconsolidate all the things fans already love about Boris.
  4. May 24, 2011
    80
    Said record does exactly what it says on the tin, veering between fuzzed-up garage rock stomp and mesmeric psychedelic sprawl in a manner that's sure to delight fans of 09's Smile.
  5. Jul 1, 2011
    71
    The appealingly schizoid approach isn't unlike that of America's Melvins, whose 1991 song "Boris" provided the band with its name. On the new Heavy Rocks, Boris makes no effort to hem in that sound.
  6. Jun 30, 2011
    70
    The tunes still aren't anything too memorable (though in fairness that's never been Boris's particular forte), and the frippertronics and sonic detail on songs like "Galaxians" makes things less ordinary than they might otherwise be, ranging between fairly standard chugging and brief breakdowns intended to sound heavily narcotic.
  7. May 27, 2011
    70
    Boris channels the heart of heavy metal music with a massive sound and unparalleled aggressiveness.
  8. May 27, 2011
    70
    Heavy Rocks 2011 is a full-on guitar rock album that utilizes the glam-ish, arena level riffs and sounds the band splattered across all three volumes of their Japanese Heavy Rock Hits 7" series.
  9. May 26, 2011
    70
    Although Heavy Rocks is a palpably different album to its release-day sibling, it also covers a fair amount of ground, and there are moments which would have made perfect sense on Attention Please (and vice versa).
  10. May 25, 2011
    70
    The goal of the album is to "redefine 'heavy' music" as a "culmination" of their career; unfortunately, it doesn't feel climactic in that way.
  11. May 24, 2011
    70
    Heavy Rocks is diverse; but since it relies on the trio's blasting power over form, it is is more consistent than Smile and sounds like a refreshed and renewed Boris back on deck.
  12. May 24, 2011
    70
    Despite the somewhat dubious timing of Heavy Rocks' release, there are still some awesome songs to be found here, and the album as a whole acts a great sampler platter of all of Boris' strengths.
  13. May 24, 2011
    70
    Heavy Rocks is a monolithic take on everything from trippy Funkadelic acid sludge to galloping Blue Öyster pöp to lightning-riding '80s thrash; yet it all billows fluffily from the same dreamy doom factory they constructed on 2005's Pink.
  14. Nov 3, 2011
    67
    Heavy Rocks (2011) improves on the glam thrash of previous studio release Smile (2008) with two centerpiece epics.
  15. Nov 22, 2011
    60
    This stylish set quantum leaps from the title track's ethereal doom disco to the acid-damaged dreampop of Tokyo Wonderland via robo-glam rave-up Party Boy, and deserves to find these most playful of veterans a wider audience. [Aug. 2011, p. 92]
  16. 60
    Because Heavy Rocks can't seem to figure out what it wants to be, it falls short of other Boris albums.
  17. May 20, 2011
    52
    Heavy Rocks does the things you expect a Boris album to do.
  18. Aug 17, 2011
    50
    It's not completely pants, but not great either. [Jul 2011, p.44]
  19. At least in name, Heavy Rocks seems to promise a return to form for Boris. It isn't. It certainly manages a return to sludgy riffed-based heaviness, but the spirit of the record's orange prequel is nowhere to be found.

There are no user reviews yet.