Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,771 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Malibu
Lowest review score: 20 Rockferry
Score distribution:
1771 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The last album's title ['Perfect From Now On'] was a promise; this one makes good on it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An enchanting, rhapsodic album of uncommon depth.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The tones and the story told -- wordlessly throughout -- are exquisite.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Wincing the Night Away makes both [previous] albums sound like fragmented potential.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    At its core, this constitutes a hearty glimpse of young Bob Dylan changing the music business, and the world, one note at a time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Perfect.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Nomad is more than a beautiful offering for the world music crowd. It's the defining work of a guitar hero.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    All told, Saltwater's the most refreshing indie pop LP since Sufjan Stevens' Illinois.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sound System presents the complete Clash, lovingly remastered on six discs, comprising the five studio LPs the classic lineup released between 1977 and 1982, plus a 3-CD set featuring non-LP singles and B-sides. A DVD unspools archival footage, plus every video. The sonic upgrade sounds best on the earliest material.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This self-titled album, released on UK indie Rough Trade in 1988, began her journey to becoming a household name. In a newly remastered 2-disc edition, Lucinda Williams blossoms all over again.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Run the Jewels 2 gut-punches the competition into second place.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Nearly a half-century after the sometimes haphazard creation, this music retains every bit of its intimacy, mystery, and resonance, and The Basement Tapes Complete boxes it up with the respect and insight it demands.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Stepping upward into the macro, the album's landmark achievement lies in Kendrick Lamar's elevation of hip-hop into subtle invisibility, his blackness not exclusively tied to the rapper image.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There's effortless, unhurried groove as he slides from the disarming grit of Nineties hip-hop in "Without You" to Sixties soul on "The Bird" and honey-dripped R&B with "Am I Wrong."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The repetitiveness of Pool tires itself out by track 12, but there's an art to flawless cohesion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Textured, ornate, and somehow seeping into the deepest parts of you. Notch it as the best Explosions in the Sky album since their previous high-water mark, 2003's The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a rare occasion of art transcending influence, with Toledo sounding like he's coming apart while doing it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Eschewing categories entirely, let's just call this trippy l'il slice of vinyl a masterwork, combining elements of salsa, house, reggae, hip-hop, and ska into one remarkably cohesive whole.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Their four-way harmonies soar to meet that now-familiar, West Coast country jangle, tart pop songs blending into a deep, rich mulch out of which melodies grow like wildflowers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Sea Change joins Weezer's Maladroit and the Red Hot Chili Peppers' By the Way on the list of beautiful-but-sad 2002 L.A. LPs.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    While the album retains some of the lo-fi insularity of his earlier four-track work, the full band backing makes Supper more of a living-room album than a back bedroom one.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    It almost goes without saying that the D4 kick the Vines, Hives, and White Stripes right square in their trendy asses.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    If you haven't heard the plaintive and curiously uplifting songs of longing and loss from this rising phenom, you're missing the emergence of one of the most affecting new talents of the past five years.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    An astonishing debut.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Every song but one falls fully developed in the five- to seven-minute ballpark, brimming with enough dissonant wizardry, smart vocal imagery, and tonal shades of rock to fly the freak flag like no aging rockers ever have.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    This is the first absolutely essential UK disc of the year.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    It sounds unfiltered, raw, and rough, and the quartet's mixture of guitar, organ, fiddle, percussion, and flute (Jethro Tull in the house) makes it all the more authentic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A rare record from an extraordinary artist, and one of the year's best.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Grandaddy's third full-length is the band's Dark Side of the Moon, a musical snapshot of postmodern existence in which things are often not what they seem.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    There's not a bad spot on the album, 12 tracks that taken as a whole make up the most exhilarating UK rock album in years.