Austin Chronicle's Scores

For 1,802 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 56% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Teens of Denial
Lowest review score: 20 Widow City
Score distribution:
1802 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    There's sex, drugs, crab cakes, and people you've never met and never will, including James Gandolfini and the children of Newtown, Conn., but their presence devastates nonetheless.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The 6-disc set witnesses the studio process as it unfolded 50 years ago, particularly the CD unfolding the complete session for "Like a Rolling Stone."... Experience history in real time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    A pair of trad-style instrumentals, "Snake Chapman's Tune" and "Pacific Slope," underlines Fulks' sublime stylistic mastery.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    With support from Geffen Records waning, Young retaliated with a crack country outfit in the International Harvesters and dug his boots into the outlaw sound with conviction.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Walkmen have solidified their place among our memories.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Confident, crunchy, and catchy as hell.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Gifted a falsetto reminiscent of famed Kentucky balladeer John Jacob Niles (1892-1980), his voice soars along rural Americana and across desolate plains ("Where I'm Calling From"). Through the tense, starry twilight of "Outlands," tranquil, meandering rivers and sprawling juniper trees ("Juniper Arms") outline a rocky terrain wherein "Some Beast Will Find You by Name." To that topography, add Adam Torres.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The songs spring from a warm hearth, upping the ante from their well-received sophomore LP, 2003's Heart.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Cultists are now treated to the best-recorded live VU documentation ever.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    At times on Small Town Heroes, Segarra echoes them [Karen Dalton, Lucinda Williams, or Gillian Welch] precisely, taking what they do best and making it her own. That's a rung many have reached for but most have never grasped.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Life Pursuit is certainly nothing new in the pop lexicon, but Murdoch's keen observational eye gives these songs vivid life.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    xx
    Spare, swirling keyboards and gently urgent guitar pluckings anchor this minimalist masterpiece, allowing Romy Madley Croft's plaintive, laudanumlike vocals to tentatively soar above the albumwide ache that is her and Oliver Sim's (e)vocation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Costello formula takes over: minimalist but experimental instrumentation, eternally durable vocals, and literate punk-wave bittersweetening.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Following in the paths of American jazz counterparts Robert Glasper and Kamasi Washington, UK jazz savants Yussef Kamaal weave a fabric of the genre steering free of up-nosed traditionalist conventions in pursuit of exploratory grooves and improvisation on Black Focus.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Made In California's hefty price tag won't endear it to serious fans, but it's the first release to encompass the Beach Boys' entire inspiring, frustrating, contradiction-laden tale.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    By going back to adolescence, Fite's made his most mature album.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    One of his most accomplished recordings.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Put this against 1994's acclaimed Foolish or 2001's Here's to Shutting Up, and it stands on its own, a reminder that Superchunk is still doing it better than most new bands today.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Odessa Tapes has it all, most tellingly a warmth and intimacy foreign to More a Legend's typically starched Nashville conformity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Combined with illuminating outtakes and demos from less-troubled follow-up New Morning, they make Another Self Portrait a far more rewarding listen than its predecessor.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Will Sheff creates albums as statements, and Away ultimately rings with a wonder in letting go.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Aural adventurers, the mothership has landed.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Loneliest Man I Ever Met refuses to be overshadowed by Kinky Friedman's outsized personality.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Every song but one falls fully developed in the five- to seven-minute ballpark, brimming with enough dissonant wizardry, smart vocal imagery, and tonal shades of rock to fly the freak flag like no aging rockers ever have.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Every song could be three, but that they're not and that each individual movement advances the album's romantic arc proves all too swoonworthy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Nothing Feels Natural picks up where Priests last left us, poking holes in the American dream, aggressive and accusatory, where both the band and listener aren't safe from Priests' rage.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Taut, toned guitars meet tendon-snapping rhythms and acrobatic frontman Mike Wiebe's almost talking punk blues--mocking, self-deprecating, unyielding in their needling efficacy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    English rapper Simbi Ajikawo, doing business in bars as the extraordinary Little Simz, tackles success, vulnerability, and sheer escapism on her lush and soul-jazz-infused Stillness in Wonderland.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Build Me Up From Bones calls on the same whimsical picking that earned her an early Grammy nomination for Best Country Instrumental Performance, while diversifying to great effect.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    The Scottish trio aren't trying to subvert anything on debut long-player The Bones of What You Believe, churning out hard-driving and utterly undeniable electro-pop, and the hooks arrive absolutely relentless.