Last of the Country Gentlemen

  • Record Label: Mute
  • Release Date: Mar 29, 2011
Metascore
77

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 18
  2. Negative: 0 out of 18
Buy On
  1. 60
    To have four songs over 10 minutes on your debut is brave; when the record recalls Neil Young's sadder moments and explores the anguish of a break-up, it is foolhardy.
  2. Under The Radar
    Mar 29, 2011
    60
    Pearson's crafted an auspicious opening scene to what will be a long and brilliant second act. [Feb 2011, p.67]
  3. Mar 29, 2011
    60
    In the format of the double album LP, with over half the songs heading into 10-minute runtimes, he's going to take you on the scenic route through all the pain he's experienced. If only Pearson was as compelling a lyricist as any of the abovementioned figures [Bruce Springsteen, Leonard Cohen, and Townes Van Zandt], Last of the Country Gentlemen might have matched the power of his earlier work.
  4. Mar 23, 2011
    60
    The violin-assisted Woman, When I Raise Hell sounds like a brilliant, disturbed relation of Bruce Springsteen's haunted Nebraska, although elsewhere, 13-minute trawls through Pearson's innermost feelings and failings, with lines such as "I'm in love with an amazing woman, she just is not my wife", make for uncomfortable listening.
  5. Apr 5, 2011
    40
    There's nothing truly transgressive or illuminating or innovative about Last of the Country Gentlemen.
User Score
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No user score yet- Awaiting 1 more rating

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 1 out of 1
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 1
  3. Negative: 0 out of 1
  1. Apr 6, 2012
    10
    "Last of the Country Gentlemen" belongs aside the "Trinity Sessions" as dark brooding masterpiece. By pealing back the emotional layers of"Last of the Country Gentlemen" belongs aside the "Trinity Sessions" as dark brooding masterpiece. By pealing back the emotional layers of pain, Josh T Pearson evokes from a place deep within his soul to create deeply moving benedictions for the heartbroken. The results are nothing short of profound. Full Review »