• Record Label: Nonesuch
  • Release Date: Sep 12, 2000
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 12 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 8 out of 12
  2. Negative: 0 out of 12
  1. A transcendent and seductively personal sound.
  2. Harris is making music that stands with -- and perhaps eclipses -- her most well-regarded work.
  3. 90
    Her songs, paradoxically both epic and intimate, shimmer and pulsate as their kaleidoscopic images and mysterious characters drift in and out of focus.
  4. This time there's less gimmickry, more sympathy for the words and melodies. Harris... has crafted 11 profound, graceful poems that rank with the best songs she's ever recorded.
  5. Five years ago she collaborated with Brian Eno and U2 producer Daniel Lanois on the ambient Wrecking Ball. Now she returns with a less intense but no less powerful new record that continues that album's heavy/ethereal vibe, courtesy of producer (and Wrecking Ball engineer) Malcolm Burn, but with a more melodic touch.
  6. Red Dirt Girl is a model of tasteful genre blending: a little bit country and a little bit electro-ambient pop.
  7. Though the album follows the path cleared by Wrecking Ball, Harris takes more confident strides... Unfortunately, a little knowledge of the recording studio can be a dangerous thing, and Red Dirt Girl occasionally crosses the line from mellow into mannered.
  8. 70
    The songs don't vary a great deal dynamically. Harris' lyrics set Red Dirt Girl apart.
  9. Alternately sparse and lush, Red Dirt Girl can be seen as a companion piece to 1995's Wrecking Ball... The diverse production only adds to Harris' earthy songwriting, adding interest to what could otherwise be lulls during the more subdued songs, and really showcases the understated lyrics that the singer has slowly become recognized for.
  10. This collection of mostly originals, her first since 1985's The Ballad of Sally Rose, is swamped in beauty: swooning vocal harmonies; delicate poetics; lilting Celticisms.... But Red Dirt Girl is stiflingly exquisite.
  11. What a weird (dishonest? ironic? clueless?) name for a record that's all literature and arty sound effects.
  12. 40
    Mud-footed trip-hop production... [Nov. 2000, p.208]
User Score
8.7

Universal acclaim- based on 17 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 10 out of 12
  2. Negative: 1 out of 12
  1. TimothyF
    Jul 8, 2005
    9
    genuinely sing-a-longable and a deep reaching sincerity in her delivery of the lyrics. the sure and easy phrasing of each song unites the genuinely sing-a-longable and a deep reaching sincerity in her delivery of the lyrics. the sure and easy phrasing of each song unites the album musically, while the wistful, down-home text ties the album together thematically. Full Review »
  2. matthewc
    Apr 13, 2005
    4
    to touchy
  3. raVen
    Apr 17, 2004
    8
    Good album. Worth buying for the title song alone, but others like "My Antonia" w/Matthews will keep it spinning in your player.