Welcome Oblivion - How to Destroy Angels
Metascore
73

Generally favorable reviews - based on 18 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 12 out of 18
  2. Negative: 0 out of 18
  1. Apr 5, 2013
    100
    Welcome Oblivion confirms that the music world needs a band like How To Destroy Angels, too. [2 Mar 2013, p.50]
  2. Mar 14, 2013
    88
    Welcome Oblivion tracks like techno-folk haunter "Ice Age" and the doom-pop jaunt "How Long?" make uncredited cameo appearances in your nightmares until you go insane and eat your own hands.
User Score
7.5

Generally favorable reviews- based on 35 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 7 out of 12
  2. Negative: 2 out of 12
  1. Mar 7, 2013
    3
    While I do appreciate that this album contains good and well made music, it is not something I can sit down and enjoy over and over again. I hate to say it, but it is boring. I get the gist of it after the first couple of songs; it's all so similar. Everyone in this band is so much more talented than what is shown here, and it's a bummer that this turned out so basic. Full Review »
  2. Mar 5, 2013
    4
    Basically Trent's soundtrack work. Terrible head shaking lyrics with a disney cruise vocalist. Won't excite 99% of NIN fans, won't gain any new fans. We get it, it's "not" NIN, but sounds exactly like what you've been doing for the past 6 years with vapid NIN-lite lyrics from a very cold and boring vocalist. If if weren't for the vocals and lyrics it would could be a decent instrumental album. Full Review »
  3. Mar 6, 2013
    9
    I get people not being able to let go of preconceived notions of what Trent should be sounding like based on their usually pretty shallow knowledge of the Nine Inch Nails catalogue. That's understandable. It's dumb, but understandable. But don't let that stop y'all from seeing that this is a solid album by a band that themselves live in the shadow of NIN, probably quite consciously. They've put together an album that ranges from ethereal to jarring sometimes within the same track while maintaining a sense of cohesion. Full Review »