Exclaim's Scores

  • Music
For 2,552 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Most Messed Up
Lowest review score: 10 Excuse My French
Score distribution:
2552 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's a deliberately weird record, but authentically weird; it's chaotic yet cohesive, full of sound, colour and unshakable vision.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Thirty years later, it's another landmark, his best record in years. Maybe decades.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ba Power is a contemporary ngoni masterclass.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The three long years since Get Disowned gifted Hop Along the chance to take their sonic sheet lightning and bottle it, giving Painted Shut a razor-sharp focus and economy that doesn't give an inch.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's always drifting, skilfully, from challenging noise to fragmented affection in the most beguiling way possible.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With this album, Superheaven have outdone themselves, writing a tight set of perfectly balanced songs that create a refreshing, unified whole.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Loyalty is undeniably a folk album, underpinned by Lindeman's finger-picked guitar, spacious piano and banjo, her husky, timeless voice having taken on a new maturity, every word now clearly articulated.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Power In The Blood is a masterpiece in a storied career.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Coming Home is a star-making vehicle that is solidly crafted, robustly traditionalist and palpably soulful. This is not just a nostalgia act; this is music from the heart, and the soul.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Heavy metal at its finest, Luminiferous is a brilliant, dynamic release, showcasing High on Fire's penchant for diverse, thoughtful songwriting and impeccable musicianship.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Wildheart has its mushy spot (see the superfluous "Destinado a Morir"), but on the whole, it stands as one of the year's standout efforts.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Summertime '06's coming of age tale is complemented perfectly by production that finds the nuance in Staples' stories and matches it, couching Staples' rhymes in a way that the streets can understand best.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Morning/Evening is a gorgeous, daring album that draws its greatest inspiration from a much-maligned genre most often associated with John Tesh and Yanni.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Thoughtful, relentless, arty and uncompromisingly queer, Fist City are a rough gem in the unforgiving expanse of the Rockies.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Still walking the high wire, with Something More Than Free, Jason Isbell continues his streak of genre-defining masterworks.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Great art isn't great art because it's easy, and this 90-plus-minute, five-act rock opera inspired by Stickles' experience with manic depression is absolutely worth spending the time with.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Thomas Arsenault manages to convincingly combine his penchant for heart-on-your-sleeve lyricism and dance floor oriented-beats to craft an almost-perfect collection of nostalgia-tinged pop songs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    You won't hear a more open hearted, impassioned and lyrically rich roots album this year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This gloriously woozy record is era-ambiguous and the sonic equivalent of a contact high.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whipple's previous PAN release, the Scythians EP, hinted at the greatness to come from this Janus club night co-founder, yet was a little too short to really demonstrate his true power. It took a full-length release to truly suss out the immensity of M.E.S.H.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Collaboration clearly suits Destroyer well: after ten albums in close to two decades, the band still sound as vital and inventive as ever, and they're operating at the top of their game on Poison Season.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Anyone who doesn't fall for Depression Cherry's hypnotic splendour probably just isn't a Beach House fan, or didn't live with the album long enough. But those who do will recognize this album as the sweeping, grand gesture they've been working up to giving us for the last nine years.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While Detox seemed poised to erode Dre's sonic reputation, Compton, reputedly his last record, instead solidifies Dre's already ironclad claims to all-time status. Not only does Compton make you forget about Detox, it also makes sure you won't ever forget about Dre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Overall, Ashes And Dust is undeniable proof of Warren Haynes' growth as a songwriter and an affirmation of his continuing successful eclecticism.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    M
    Produced by Garm of Ulver, the textures of M are even more finely hewn and interwoven than its predecessor, resulting in a record that is at once profoundly tactile and deeply sensual.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Beauty Behind the Madness proves that the Weeknd can thrive in the mainstream, and while the lyrics aren't overtly profound, he's proven that he is more versatile than previously thought, which is perhaps of greater importance at this stage in his career.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Anthropocene Extinction is another stroke of genius by one of the best heavy bands of all time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Resistance is evidence not only of the Souljazz Orchestra's abilities, but also of their audacity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Didn't He Ramble shimmers, saunters and charms; Hansard has never sounded so good.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rawlings-Welch are so good and natural in their borrowing that Nashville Obsolete evokes familiar sepia-toned moods almost without ever sounding worn-out or dated, the only exception perhaps being "Short Haired Woman Blues," on which the tempo feels sluggish.