Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,424 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Rumours [35th Anniversary Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Liz Phair
Score distribution:
6,424 music reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It is beautiful, emotive music, literally and figuratively entrancing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It is this excess of ambition over achievement, as opposed to any real consistency, which makes FutureSex/LoveSounds more of an album than Justified was. Songs which sound puzzlingly self-indulgent in isolation-- most obviously, the smirking, tenuously tuneful first single "SexyBack"-- are cloaked in a compelling intensity and purposefulness when played in succession.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Bands like Mazzy Star, Galaxie 500, Spiritualized, and Slowdive will come to mind, but this is neither pastiche nor homage.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    As rap music, The Doctor’s Advocate is good; as tangled psychodrama, it's better.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Like the best work of its participants, Beast Moans is no pornographer's rubdown; it delivers on its tease.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Throughout The Inspiration, Jeezy shows a muddled desire to transcend the clichés he helped create, to create further complexity without ever resolving it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    I doubt Low fans who've held on this long will rebel against these new textures, more the way they're employed-- the band has added an almost disconcerting levity, and subtracted the gentleness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    In the end, what makes The Foley Room Tobin's best album in seven years is the way his bent for organized chaos manifests as a deft control of every sound that surrounds him: Anything's a beat, everything's a break, and the difference between sound and music is entirely contextual.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It's a great debut for a band with an impressive, distinctive sound.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    1990s bring hooks, sneers and, well, intoxicants to spare, with the punched-up sheen of a production budget to boot (helmed by ex-Suede guitarist Bernard Butler).
    • 78 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Rise Above will drop plenty of jaws, and, like Deerhoof, Dirty Projectors are restructuring rock on a compositional level rather than a sonic one.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Whether he delivered on the full extent of what he wanted to achieve is up for debate; luckily, he's good enough that even when he comes up short, he's still better than most.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Vernon gives a soulful performance full of intuitive swells and fades, his phrasing and pronunciation making his voice as much a purely sonic instrument as his guitar.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Their jangly melodies claw their way inside your brain just the same, making them latest in a long line of Glasgow bands to effortlessly combine celebratory sonics and miserablist lyrics into something singular.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    To that end, the whole album has a lightness of touch that makes it sound warm and comfortable, especially after the sad weight evident on the also-excellent "Margerine Eclipse."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It's hard to predict where they'll go from here when Receivers sounds as if they've stretched their favorite sonic ideas to the very brink of saturation--but no one could have guessed they'd take them quite this far.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Crystal Stilts make terrific use of their recycled material, appropriating favorite forebears' brooding moves (and their richly endowed signifiers), and contributing their own deft hooks and stealth energy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It may not deliver the same jolt as its predecessor, but its somewhat cleaner production highlights Love Is All's strengthened pop prowess.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Rather than re-tracing the path that made him popular, he has hacked into the wilderness of his new inspirations, no matter how divergent, and emerged triumphant.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    A Morrissey record you can dig into without caring much about the man's lyrics.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    There's thrilling evidence of compelling, thoughtful craftsmanship.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    The Yeah Yeah Yeahs still create great, compelling pop-rock, largely because of the way the songs themselves are organized, with conventional verse-chorus structures repeatedly eschewed in favor of detours, miniature grooves, and lengthy asides that produce the sensation of a band and a singer impulsively following their own emotional whims.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    The album moves at roughly the same pace and with the same general tone, rendering some of the songs indistinguishable at first, but committed listens will reveal this to be as nuanced and as rich of a production as anything either Dreijer has done.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    His vantage from Eagle is one of textured ambivalence; his images split and shimmer like double-exposures, immediately releasing an obvious meaning quickly followed by a subtler one that equivocates the first.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Manners is deceptively consistent even beyond its singles--if you like one Passion Pit song, you'll probably like them all.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    II
    It's mellow and smooth and relaxing, sure, but it's also unpredictable and full of little revelations and turns of sound that make it one of space disco's crowning recent achievements.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Under and Under dispatches the charge of repetition and "samey" songcraft very quickly.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Jay Stay Paid's biggest strengths don't lie in its guest roster, impressive as it is. It's the way these reconstructed, reassembled beats so vividly show off how left-field he was willing to get in the service of finding new ways to make a beat knock.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    Whatever the case, he and Switch are kicking off summer with an armful of perfect cookout-, top down-ready songs, like the daytime soundtrack equivalent of all of the summertime night's rooftop music that's been coming from Swedes Air France and the Tough Alliance and their new wave of American indie disciples, such as Real Estate and Memory Cassette in the past year-plus.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    All the sounds and ideas emanate from the same sources and desires, and the prismatic contrasts between them illuminate this intriguing and heartfelt album.