Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,207 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
4,207 music reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The only instruments that aren't slaves to the beat are Gregory Roberts and Stephen Patterson's vocals, which mingle into perfectly messy harmonies.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On their debut disc, Post-Nothing, guitarist Brian King and drummer David Prowse deliver a rush of fuzzed-out rockers and stoner-metal grooves, plus an awesomely bummed-out drone called 'I Quit Girls.'
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Produced by Steve Albini, Cocker's excellent second solo disc sets hilariously over-the-top come-ons to bruising garage rock and woozy soul.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Listeners are advised to ignore the authenticity issues and focus on Moore's catchy tunes and warm voice on Amanda Leigh.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    They take their blue-eyed romanticism deadly serious, asking, "Wouldn't it be sweet if you could die from a broken heart?" like genuine kamikazes of love.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Everett's songwriting hasn't always kept pace with his musical and literary ambitions. But these tales of frustrated desire are vividly sketched, with the Eels delivering muddy roadhouse rockers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's all gloriously indulgent--Wolf is one kook who should never try to resist his own kookiness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rancid sat out most of the Bush years, and they make up for lost time here, decrying corporate greed and the Iraq War in rave-ups.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As often as not the results are dumb. And that's an awfully good thing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Here Christian Karlsson and Pontus Winnberg hook up with indie boy Andrew Wyatt, manhandling his plaintive love ballads until they explode into freewheeling electro fantasias.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dinosaur Jr. set the standard for convulsive indie-rock guitar fireworks in the Eighties. Incredibly, the band's original lineup--guitarist J Mascis, bassist Lou Barlow and drummer Murph--hasn't lost a thunderous step.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's engrossing and organic in a way other all-star drive-by projects rarely are.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    With help from Rick Rubin and Bright Eyes producer Mike Mogis, Yorn has found his voice on Back and Fourth, a mostly acoustic beauty recorded in Omaha, Nebraska, with musicians heard on Conor Oberst's Saddle Creek label.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Epic? Extremely. Awesome? Monstrously.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The biggest fun is hearing Diplo and Switch go off the leash, mixing surf guitar and horse whinnies, bong burbles and air horns. By the end, they're Auto-Tuning a baby's wail, clearly high enough, artistically, to try anything.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    McCauley sounds no less lonely, staring down abandonment and death in gentle waltzes and country-rock rambles.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Never the most convincing singer, Moby wisely farms out vocal duties to friends--of them unknowns and ripe for discovery. It's a return to form but with a wider romantic streak. Age will do that.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Any addition to his tiny catalog is notable. But this live DVD/CD set is more than barrel scrapings.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A charming indie-pop ode to the rootlessness of the permanently hot-tubbed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The best bits feel like being chased through a moonless night by a sexy moor witch.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The brainy duo--hot-shit remixer Jona Bechtolt and singer/science writer Claire Evans--holed up in a thrown-together studio in rural West Texas and ended up with what might be their breakthrough record.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Blur went from wanna-be's ("Popscene") to provocateurs ("Parklife") to artistes ("Beetlebum") to world travelers ("Good Song"), and, rare moments of torpid dross aside, remained fascinating with each mood change.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When George Harrison planned the reissue of "All Things Must Pass" in 2000, he fought the urge to simplify the original mixes. So he might well have loved this EP of his songs, most from All Things, recorded in 2001 by Jim James shortly after Harrison's death.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Her music floats exhilaratingly outside of time, blending thumping garage-rock rhythms, doo-wop chords, Spectorian girl-group stylings.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On the majestic closer, alongside a sad cello, he insists, "There is no sun." With sound this blazingly bright, who needs it?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Benson's fourth solo jam is his first since the Raconteurs introduced him to the masses, which means now everybody gets to play catch-up with his skewed acumen for classic power pop in the Seventies AM-gold mode of Wings and ELO.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I Look to You spends little time looking back. It is a modern soul record, a collection of sleek, often spunky love songs that aim at something more immediate and tangible than nostalgia or catharsis: Houston wants back in the diva stakes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You get a little sick of hearing the crowd between songs (we get it, there's an audience!), but in many ways this is the album the Crowes have been meaning to record for years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Playing like a welcome sequel to 2006's style-hopping "I Am Not Afraid of You and I Will Beat Your Ass," Yo La Tengo's 16th studio album finds the New Jersey trio bringing out Farfisa solos and celebrating ongoing couplehood.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    He moans echo-caked utopian incantations, hustles some groovy conspiracy theories, spins a stolen Dylan melody into a elegiac space jam and ponders the nature of "circular time." But there's as much Sonic Youth doom in his band's guitar explorations as there is folky grooviness.