The 405's Scores

  • Music
For 1,061 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 63% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Neon Icon
Lowest review score: 20 Everything Now
Score distribution:
1061 music reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They’ve dredged up their youthful feelings and animated them in both honest and affectionate tones, and it makes You Might Be Smiling Now… a joyous rummage through swathes of bleary nostalgia.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a continuation of U2’s work at this point in their career, Songs of Experience is a decent addition to their legacy that longtime fans should be generally pleased by. However, it still suffers from the same issues that have made U2 so polarizing in recent years, and is unlikely to change anyone’s mind about the band one way or another.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    When all is said and done, Soul of a Woman cements itself as a fitting send-off for a woman who flat-out owned the stage and spearheaded a scene, transcending the notions of “neo” and “revival” to make music that was impassioned and pure. Sharon Jones lives on every time you press play.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Rest is her gateway out from the darkness, a way of coping with her fragilities, a processor of emotions, her loss, and also her most personal work to date, simply, where Charlotte is finally able to be Charlotte.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With this captivating sequel, The Body & Full of Hell have given us something striking that could only have been realized with each other.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Xenoula is a funky, fresh and downright fun album that comprises many palette-expanding songs for anyone with pop proclivities.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If All I Was Was Black is often times both troubling and soothing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Although sonically ominous, Relfection of Youth possesses a sophisticated breed of optimism which embodies itself through realism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Are We There is one of the finest folk-ish albums of this decade, but this timely reissue illustrates that Van Etten’s remarkable talent has always been omnipresent. Eight years on, her incoming anxious queries and lovelorn passages are as pertinent as they’ve ever been.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Utopia sees Björk demonstrating newfound strength and optimism, painting in bright shades and surrounding herself with the sounds of her own Eden. We are all kindly invited along.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    This is perhaps the most simply alive Baths has yet sounded on record, retaining enough of his emotional heft, while allowing for an entirely new collage of flashy, elated songcraft. This is Baths triumphant.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    The Greatest Gift is an appropriate accompaniment to Carrie and Lowell. A simple compilation of oddball tracks, it delivers enough to stand for itself--but is ultimately only really for the enjoyment of Stevens’ long-time fans.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    L’Orange L’Orange doesn’t exist in one place or detail specific events, which is to say it’s a fine contrast to the 21st century’s culture of volume. It simply is, and that gives it grace.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Few albums in the Oh Sees catalogue are as emotionally intimate as Memory Of A Cut Off Head.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Many of the tracks vary to such a degree that those not acquainted with Olsen would be forgiven for thinking they were not by the same artist, yet to those who appreciate her work, the artist’s strong narrative ties the collection together.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Mechanics of Dominion is too heady for its own good, but still holds ground as a wonderful combination of influences and post-genre style. It takes time for it to reveal itself, and it’s usually worth the investment.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A common pattern on this record? A feeling of positivity and amusement that shines through in almost every song, while still preserving a solemn mood.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In keeping it short and sour, the normally too giving Sleigh Bells have finally done it: left us wanting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While this easily could have been an enjoyable throwaway, with two young artists linking up for the hype and moving it, it beats all odds to stand as one of 2017's most enjoyable and essential moments.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The record is a lot of things and also unquestionably not, for the most part embodying an impregnable and extraordinary soundscape that fortifies itself against deconstruction, but its one truly distinctive quality is that it’s the precise opposite of boring.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    On The Dusk In Us, we have a handful of tracks that see Converge pushing at the boundaries of their sound, even escaping it entirely. This leads to some of the most accessible, catchy, and (uncoincidentally) most emotionally resonant work of their careers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Backwater being their most complete and mature release to date, the band’s creative dynamic remains organic and allows them to adjust themselves to a rhythm of their choosing, as they evolve as musicians and as a two-piece band with a wide range of possibilities.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    She seems a lot happier, or at least more energetic and outgoing, coming into second album Plunge. But that only seems to bring her up against more frustrations in the world around her, which are wrought vividly throughout.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Endless Shimmering is such a relief to listen to. It’s not just a correction for the band, it’s also a redemption and a potential catalyst for an exciting new stage in their career as instrumental rock leaders.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What elevates Turn Out The Lights is that it’s sensory as well as earnest, personally destabilising while artfully assured; it oscillates in the spilling synaesthesia of panic attacks, the dizzying clarity of epiphany, the paralysing futility of depressive episodes, the unfathomable locus of being okay.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The album is an engaging and enjoyable listen and deserves all the credit it will inevitably receive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Ultimately, A flame my love, a frequency is an intimate voyage of a single human soul through nature, and the minimalistic synth compositions she has used to render this prove to be an ideal vessel.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Carpenter here brings together the themes from 13 of his movies to remind us exactly how pervasive is his influence on modern culture.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ken
    This album scales back significantly from the relative bombast of the grand Poison Season in favor of a more intimate, simple setting. Stranding himself nearly alone--aside from longtime collaborator Josh Wells--Bejar hunkered down to record the simultaneously unconcerned and emotional splash that is ken.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For those of us all too invested in the constant slew of bigger, louder, more flashy presentations every week, it's a true pleasure to get lost in such a graceful, deceptively simple world. Open is a true treat.