The New York Times' Scores

For 1,828 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 The Runners Four
Lowest review score: 10 All The Right Reasons
Score distribution:
1828 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For much of "Late Registration," the striver has turned into a hip-hop V.I.P., and a cool arrogance has crept into the songs. [29 Aug 2005]
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This album doesn't always play to her strengths. [13 Sep 2005]
    • The New York Times
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This music sounds fantastic, as usual--clean, tight and separated in the mix--but songwriting inspiration is in short supply.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s filled with spacey, leisurely songs about desire, longing, betrayal and letting go. The album plays as one long tease on the way to its last song: the 10-minute, three-part “Out My Mind, Just in Time,” which is even more protracted.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Black Thought... sounds more focused than he did on the Roots’ last album, “The Tipping Point,” and more engaged than on the one before it, “Phrenology.” But because he’s not the kind of rapper to modulate his emotional pitch, his intensity can level off into monotony.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Few songs on "Blunderbuss" truly knock the wind out of you, as the White Stripes could - even with riffs that were fragmentary, simple or borrowed. This is a songwriter's record, and a kind of orchestrator's record; there's also a new overall vehemence in the lyrics, hammering on dishonesty, jealousy, immorality.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Normally, she's emphatic in the right places, but this album also includes some of Ms. Lambert's least committed singing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Broken Social Scene confuses integrity with indulgence, burying good songs under way too much studio tomfoolery. [10 Oct 2005]
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    She’s still a strong singer, especially on “Told You So,” but some of her essential grit is lost to the machines.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When this album whispers, as it does on large swaths of the second half, it neuters Ms. Lambert’s gifts. Even with a voice as signature as hers, there’s little to elevate songs like “Good Ol’ Days” or “Dear Old Sun.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    AM
    The songs are still sullen, smart and cleverly constructed. But too often on AM, Arctic Monkeys sound less like amalgamators than like imitators.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album has stability, consistency. But too much of it.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The album wears thin in totality, but has isolated moments: entrances and releases and dropouts.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At 10 songs that span barely 30 minutes, this album is so terse it makes Nas’s “Illmatic” seem like “Infinite Jest.” And often it can feel as if Earl Sweatshirt is rapping his dense syllabic tumbles with his back facing the microphone, which is perplexing, since few rappers love the sound of sticky syllables as much as he does.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are 17 songs here, and after a while, they feel short on basic songwriting surprises: Built on narrow foundations, high on crude intuition, they keep running into walls.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The results have been slow and messy and atmospheric, full of contemporary R&B's customary ingredients (virtual strings, AutoTune, gold-plated emotion) but stretched out, heavy on atmosphere, light on hooks.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Mr. Haggard sounds more fatigued than his old sidekick, his voice less willing to bend. There are some lovely moments of stern self-loathing ("Bad Actor," "How Did You Find Me Here"); Mr. Haggard is always sharper when pointing the finger at himself than when celebrating love, as he often does on this album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Here and there this record finds its comfortable center. [16 Oct 2006]
    • The New York Times
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    But she's not attempting a simple 80's revival; for all the vaguely familiar hooks, there are also sustained, wistful overlays of strings and acoustic guitar that enfold the music like a haze of indistinct memory. [14 Nov 2005]
    • The New York Times
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In the end, unfortunately, "Antics" is fairly uneven. [19 Sep 2004]
    • The New York Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Taking the onus off his guitar playing dilutes Mr. Banhart's talent, and sometimes "Cripple Crow" makes of him what some people perhaps want him to be: a simulacrum of an obscure 1960's musician, a maker of albums that were so rare they never existed. [12 Sep 2005]
    • The New York Times
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    "Show Your Bones" doesn't confide much, but it's a picture of a band that's not quite sure what to do next. [27 Mar 2006]
    • The New York Times
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It's got plenty of ups and downs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Why is her big-voiced delivery so similar and balanced in nearly every song? Why are there no sharp intakes of breath, stutters, meaningful cracks or strange textures, like the battling squeaks that made "Love," one of her early singles, so good?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Mr. Toussaint's florid yet precise New Orleans piano, the way he can make a horn section laugh or sigh, and the stubborn idealism and canny humor of his songs temper Mr. Costello's convoluted earnestness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    He is clearly searching for a more mature style. But the musical and rhetorical convolutions of “Cassadaga” are no substitute, yet, for the way he used to blurt things out. [9 Apr 2007]
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    "The Colour in Anything" grows self-pitying, almost maudlin, in ways Mr. Blake has managed to avoid in the past simply by using more elusive lyrical metaphors. It is also unreasonably long: a little over an hour and a quarter.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s effortfully tossed off; it’s a middling record battling against his built-in high standards.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    He’s worth your $13.98 even when he’s only offering a grab bag like this one. [11 Dec 2006]
    • The New York Times
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This is a dull album, revealing how over the space of three records, Mr. Albarn and Mr. Hewlett have moved from wacky conceptualists to self-satisfied dilettantes.