Uncut's Scores

  • Music
For 5,789 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Scissor Sisters
Lowest review score: 10 Let Me Introduce My Friends
Score distribution:
5,789 music reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Fed
    Fed is beautifully excessive, ornamented with dazzling soul/pop arrangements. [Sep 2008, p.114]
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    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tell Tale Signs is awash with evidence of his staggering mercuriality, his evident determination even in the studio to repeat himself as little as possible, re-takes not merely the occasion for refinement, the honing of a song into static finality, but serial re-imaginings.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Smart, cocksure and as cosmopolitan as New York itself, Live At Shea Stadium deserves a place amongst the greats.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It features tracks recorded with rock outfits like The Flying Hearts which recall Jonathan Richman and Lou Reed; minimal, folksy miniatures that sound a ltttle like John Martyn or James Taylor; and a string of delicious, whimsical synth-pop songs that are as good as anything in the early-'80s canon. [Dec 2008, p.115]
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    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Where Manu Chao might have smoothed off some of the rough edges during his spell as co-producer, this album positively celebrates those grungier moments.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sugar Mountain is a fascinating snapshot of Neil Young at a transitory moment in his long career, for which it also provides an indelible template.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This slice of weird-rock from a more contented American decade is playful and preposterous in equal measure. [Feb 2009, p.89]
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    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It feels like one of the landmark American albums of the century so far. [Jan 2008, p.86]
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is much, meanwhile, to recommend the O’Brien remix, or “deconstruction” as he puts it. What O’Brien has mostly done is strip away the more ornate layers of the Palmer mix and cutting back on the album’s moments of more florid melodrama.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As a State of the Union address, this bold and often brilliant record is less inclined towards optimism than, say, Springsteen’s admirable "Working On A Dream."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The album’s a gas, a riot, a hoot.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With Spoils, Alasdair Roberts has delivered his finest work to date. [May 2009, p.95]
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    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There’s more, too much more, to come, but for now, Volume One will do just fine.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A world away from their ladrock roots, you might say.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What's in here finds the band inventive, unfailingly tuneful, and, rather belying the title, mellowing magnificently with age. [Aug 2009, p.87]
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    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is an excellent album that manages to be both a mature summary of an artist’s career and something completely fresh and new.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Here, his luxurious voice, weathered and warm, sits atop intuitive improvations from the likes of Christian Fennesz and Evan Parker. [Nov 2009, p.106]
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    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    My Dusty Road is facinating as an archive set. [Oct 2009, p.120]
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    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What's absolutely consistent is Young's almost alchemical ability to mesmerise with the sparest of tools - his reedy quaver and sturdy but unflashy accompaniment providing the only embellishments to his elliptical lyrics and aching melodies. [Jan 2010, p. 120]
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    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Audacious cybernetic pirouettes such as "Poison Lips" and "Flashmob" bear the hallmarks of a musician enjoying a purple patch, who is able to caress from his machines a spectrum of emotion that leaves the listener purring with pleasure. [Oct 2009, p.119]
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    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Hubble bubble! From weird sources and high ideals comes a spooky, sensual piece of pop sorcery. And it's bewitching. [Dec 2009, p. 91]
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    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is an unassuming brilliance to much that they do and, as ever, We Used To Think The Freeway Sounded Like A River is a-bristle with finely-tooled detai.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Brewis brothers may be at odds with the modern world, but in this stunningly realised double album, they've created the ultimate sanctuary.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    To devotees, however, it sounds very much like a second masterpiece: a different kind of epic to "Ys," and one with enough hooks and charms to ensnare at least a few Newsom agnostics. [Apr 2010, p.82]
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Big To-Do, it's pleasing to report, rocks as hard and loud as anything they've previously done. [Apr 2010, p.78]
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    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Exile itself remains the tour de force it's been since release in May '72. [Jun 2010, p.104]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    American Slang delivers spectacularly on all expected fronts. Everything that was great about The '59 Sound is here, but the sound is even bigger, epic without getting blustery.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tin Can Trust is a masterful album from an undeniably great American band, at the peak of its considerable powerers. [Sep 2010, p.88]
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    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Not since Lennon howled "Mother" have there been songs as naked and fraught as "Mama Here, Mama Gone" and "March 11 1962." [Jun 2010, p.88]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The guitar sounds engineered here by Young and Lanois are astonishing, almost terrifying at times in their elemental beauty. [Nov 2010, p.78]
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