Village Voice's Scores

For 764 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Truth
Lowest review score: 10 God Says No
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 764
764 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Beasties of 5 Boroughs seem scared--reluctant to innovate; serving up nonsense lyrics and numbing production that are just plain lazy... sensing that there's nowhere to go but down, so better to establish a passable holding pattern than risk an inexcusable backslide toward irrelevance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Jennifer Lopez makes albums for the same reasons you and I give holiday gifts to people we don't exactly like: vanity and obligation.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There's an overwhelming tinny ring that starts on the second track, "Beauty on the Fire," and ends with the last track--it's this young possum's voice.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There is some entertainment value in Probot. The manufactured praise accompanying Grohl, supplied by a corps of pro fuglemen who lead and escort the illustrious on his vanity venture, is grand.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    I'm just not sure that pop music should come out of a thesaurus.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    This suspicious move into another moribund genre resembles the frustrated strivings of a band uncertain of how to exist After Rock.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Like nearly any DM record, Exciter, their 14th album, mostly leaves one hungry for the inevitable remixes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    On their directionless new Creature Comforts, Black Dice seem confused, in fact, about what precisely their aesthetic is.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Vines have trouble faking both the depth of feeling and the noisome mischief that good garage-punk requires, and the two rote Britpop numbers they tack on don't help.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A bore of an album.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Tenaciously mindless and effortlessly grim.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Nowadays, the Gallaghers can only offer stylized guitar murk and hookless acoustic ditties; even scarier, you can understand their lyrics, which are more mush-headed and lovey-dovey than you'd expect from a band this self-satisfied.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    t's nü-Mariah on mood stabilizers, extended with pseudo-pastiches of semi-popular songs.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Less than the sum of their parts, the album and the band don't even amount to an interesting failure, because the known quantities do what they have always done only this time in tandem.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    There's something rote and antiseptic about the album's party mood--the electro-beats' clean squelch, the undercooked hooks, the odd primness of Kylie's singing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The title track's having-it-all exhaustion, underscored by its bipolar sonics and start-stop rhythms, will endear her to the Allison Pearson crowd; a few other tunes will reinforce her fan base among fellow whiny celebrities.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Strangely: no guitar, only piano. Which, strangely, doesn't make them sound any more romantic, nor does it add interest to the other songs, which are either too slow, too genre, or too lyrically distracting.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Ultimately, most Run DMC fans would have been much happier with old-school Run, D, and Jay than with a smorgasbord of Billboard chart-toppers for hire.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Bogged in reverb tanks, delays, and other swirly effects, Some Cities' production masks their slovenly musicianship.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Human After All is determinedly monochromatic aurally, compositionally, and mood-wise. Gosh, they really are robots--the music is flat, barely inflected, sitting there like a vending machine waiting patiently for your quarters.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Endicott, who jumps skin from Julian Casablancas to Robert Smith to the guy from the Killers in just three tracks, has less charisma than a mustard plug.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It's long and boring and preachy.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    A record that's half as long as The Fragile but just as plodding and mummified.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    In the end, it's Oasis's attempts to capture former pinnacles, from trying to re-create the simple sunny-side-up pleasures of "Live Forever" to trying for another album-ending mountain like "Champagne Supernova," that keep their latter-day output so entirely forgettable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Corgan does his level best to make the whole affair as joyless as possible.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Somebody press more charges against this fool--he's losing focus.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Death Cab succeed by refusing to offend. That can be an admirable trait in a person, but never in a musician.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It takes nearly 13 cuts in on the new, G-approved Blood Money before you hear anything that sounds like a real Mobb Deep record.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    [It] feels more like record label franchise building--"And let's get Willie to sing a Grateful Dead song!" "Cool!"--than an actual, like, album.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The Diane Warren and Desmond Child faux-Steinman stuff is far worse, but the inescapable message of Bat III is that even Meat's former partner hasn't been at peak strength for at least a decade.