Yellow & Green

Metascore
82

Universal acclaim - based on 26 Critics

Critic score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 26
  2. Negative: 0 out of 26
  1. 60
    Their third album totaling 75 minutes and spread, slightly unnecessarily, over two CDs, it reaches unexpected new heights in the pantheon of 'metal bands who mellowed out'.
  2. Jul 17, 2012
    50
    The result is flat and congealed, lacking danger.
  3. Jul 13, 2012
    40
    Throughout this often incoherent hodgepodge of tunes, Baroness has mostly abandoned the contrast that made its previous records work so well.
User Score
8.3

Universal acclaim- based on 31 Ratings

User score distribution:
  1. Positive: 9 out of 10
  2. Mixed: 0 out of 10
  3. Negative: 1 out of 10
  1. Jul 17, 2012
    9
    I love Red album and Blue record. New stuff is different, but as good as older records. Best songs: Take my bones away, Psalms Alive, The Line Between
  2. Jul 22, 2012
    10
    This album took me a few listens, because I was expecting some more of the same Baroness that I know and love. Overall, it is a very mellowThis album took me a few listens, because I was expecting some more of the same Baroness that I know and love. Overall, it is a very mellow record for them. Baizley has certainly cleaned up the vocals, and the backing vocals stand out a lot more. There are some very nice instrumental moments, some great heavy moments, but overall it is a very enjoyable listen. In a year where I've been let down by a lot of albums that I've been looking forward to, this does not disappoint. Just buy it, crank it up, and enjoy the ride. Full Review »
  3. Jul 17, 2012
    10
    I am absurdly pleased with this album. The songs flow together beautifully and balance the dynamics of heavy and melodic to perfection. OnlyI am absurdly pleased with this album. The songs flow together beautifully and balance the dynamics of heavy and melodic to perfection. Only a fool would pigeon hole this band as metal after the metamorphosis that was Red and Blue. They are musicians that are evolving as they learn about themselves, the world, and what it means to grow. They are far from stale and have not gone soft. They have simply taken the next step too many musicians these days are afraid to make. Full Review »