Billboard.com's Scores

  • Music
For 758 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 83% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 14% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Sticky Fingers [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 40 Water for Your Soul
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 0 out of 758
758 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The vibe on the new album may be rootsier and more acoustic than Walker's usual fare, but it still emphasizes his knack for memorable wordplay and melodic know-how, which have earned him writing and producing gigs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On its fifth studio album, "Fire Away," Ozomatli shows a remarkable ability to innovate with its most expansive and energetic set in years.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The opening track, "Don't Let Me Fall," showcases the rapper's smoothed-voice singing talent and vulnerability ("They say what goes up must come down/But don't let me fall") over a booming guitar, while "Magic" (featuring Weezer frontman Rivers Cuomo) takes a more pop-driven direction.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even as his piecework band stretches the sound in unexpected directions, Lidell--like a peculiar cross of Prince and Otis Redding--remains confidently true to his soul vision, creating a tense musical discourse that wrings raw emotion from each eclectic track.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While "The Oracle" is certainly familiar, it still sounds fresh enough and well worth the wait for fans who prefer their Godsmack served up straight.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bingham's writing is filled with stark images and canny observations, which is evident on such tracks as "Self-Righteous Wall" and album opener "The Poet." Look for this gifted young artist's star to keep rising.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By using the lineup shift as a chance to explore different terrain-namely, eschewing pop choruses and traditional vocals-Underoath's sprawling, at-times disquieting music is newly realized.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all their diversity and maturity, these songs couldn't have been written by anyone else, and this welcome return shows that the three years since the last Bright Eyes album have been well spent.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Underneath the Pine is at its best on songs like Got Blinded, Still Sound and Divina, with solid grooves and discernable melodies that leap out from the kaleidoscopic bramble.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sonically it's a super-charged take on the girl-group sound, with thundering drums, multilayered vocals, heart-wrenching lyrics and loads of echo-all of which contrasts with her honeyed voice.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The easier-but not exactly wiser-route for Brown would've been to take jabs at those who turned their backs on him, but his tactic here seems to give listeners a solid album.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Akinmusire has chosen to challenge listeners, exploring free territory where Smith squeaks and squawks his way into the wilderness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mostly, though, the surprisingly warm-blooded Audio, Video, Disco reveals Justice to be human after all.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Clearly you can take McBride--who co-wrote six of these tracks--anywhere and she'll sound just fine.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band fares better in a handful of frothier cuts.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The rage gives American Capitalist a fierce potency.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You can hear the result of all those showbiz connections in the radio-ready economy of high-sheen hook bombs.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They never supersede the originals, but hardly suffer in comparison.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Frontman Randy Blythe still growls his guts out while his bandmates hammer away at economy-sized grooves that suggest an extreme-sports version of Southern rock.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An old-fashioned countrypolitan album-and a really good one at that.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Picture Show should end up as one the year's most tuneful rock releases.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its new studio album, Tornado, seems designed to demonstrate that stardom hasn't separated the band from the backwoods roots it famously celebrated in the song "Boondocks."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even with so many producers lending a hand, there isn't a dud to be found on the record's thirteen tracks.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rebel Soul brings [that devil (without a cause, of course)-may-care 'tude] back into the mix without sacrificing the lessons Rock learned from working with Rubin and his cadre of top-shelf session hands--only this time he applied them to the live, lived-in feel of his Twisted Brown Trucker band.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo have made an analog album that's less of a "throwback" and more of a salute to the idols that would now do anything to hop on the duo's full-length.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The journey of its latest change has been bumpy, but by blending its storied past with the musical present, Queensrÿche's members prove the band as a whole is indeed greater than any one person.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He makes up for the lack of addictive anthems and playfulness with his impressionable stream of sentiments--our kryptonite, his superpower.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Black Keys' eighth long player isn't loaded with obvious hits, and that's more than okay--because this is a brave, varied and engaging collection of songs.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Songs of Innocence is a colossal-sounding record from rock's ultimate stadium wreckers, and a quick listen reveals why no other marketing strategy would have worked.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hudson links with a long tradition of powerful female vocalists making highly danceable music. And the spare templates she uses here, which are heavy on rhythm and relatively empty otherwise, give her plenty of space to flex her powerful voice.