Clash Music's Scores

  • Music
For 1,936 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 56% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Bright Phoebus [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 10 Wake Up!
Score distribution:
1936 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A work of quite singular intensity, it leaves a lasting impact.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Less reliant on theory or process, Love Streams is a testament to Hecker’s innate musical sense of direction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Beautifully produced and blessed with Guy Garvey in fine voice, it's a small but perfectly formed step forward.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As ever with this band, it’s sure to be an idiosyncratic but beguiling direction, although there’s no hurry with so much to pick over on this thoughtful latest outing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Whilst each track delivers exactly what is to be expected from an IAK album it is a little disappointing that there seems to have been no development from the previous outing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's unfathomably exciting stuff.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Driven by crispy drum machines and shimmering synths, Lanza’s second full-length Hyperdub offering is instantly more direct and relatable than its predecessor; cloudy reverb is replaced by sheeny production.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A solid debut then, full of yearning and barstool tales.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It bursts with techno beats that jump wildly from deep and dark to bright and euphoric.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, Salad Days is an aural testament to the old adage that there’s a fine line between genius and insanity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some of the riffs are quite incredible ('A More Perfect Union'), and the general effect of the whole album is that the listener will want to weep and dance simultaneously. Simply brilliant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    For TNP converts this will no doubt be regarded as a masterpiece. But for the casual listener, it’s simply another solid 21st century ambient record to help while away the late hours.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If you can cope with the extreme twee, Heartleap is a diamond.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s her vocal prowess that threads together the line-up of producer-du-jour types that feature on For All We Know. That, and the infectious grooves that dominate this album provide endless enjoyment--18 tracks worth, to be precise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All Our Gods Have Abandoned Us isn’t a sonic leap into new pastures, rather it’s the sound of a band nailing their sound and operating at the very top of their game. In a genre as crowded as metalcore, Architects have managed to craft a sound that’s instantly and recognisably Architects.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The only maturity in their sound is towards a more ambient quarter. Elevator music not quite, but rising out of the background might be an issue.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fade finds YLT at their most wistfully contemplative; a thought only softened by the paradox that this might just be one of their best yet.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A magnificent aural topography of Kaitlyn Aurelia Smith’s inspired imagination.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Earl Sweatshirt is telling truths rather than forging fantasy, and Doris is a disturbed and penetrating journey into the mind of the boy that came back from Samoa.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [Gibbs] expertly negotiates Madlib’s minefield, forcefully popping words off the producer’s gorgeously mined snares and snatched vocal loops.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Clements and Griffiths have sculpted something truly special out of their final time with their friend and, while too late for all of the numerous lists, it deserves to be held up as one of the most affecting and impressive releases of a difficult year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Romare sets out to bring in elements of his distinct sound from across his career always combining it with something fresh and invigorating. The fact that all of these elements come together into such an approachable and restrained album is quite impressive.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After the impulsive creativity of Logos, Parallax, by contrast, is a much more refined listen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rest assured, his remarkable voice and grasp of melody remain undimmed and while it may not sound exactly as you were expecting, it is a bold, distinctive and genuinely excellent record.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She embraces their words, often of death and reminiscence on youth, as if they’d come from deep within herself. It is, after 38 years, a fine reminder of her vital place in British musical tradition, as the essential elder stateswoman of folk.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an album that can make you weepy in the hazy blur of the wee small hours, and euphoric in the fuzzy afternoon sun.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rather than risk nestling ever-deeper into their cushy role as purveyors of twee-approved, candied indie-rock, The Radio Dept. have opted for a collection of songs that is as decidedly unapologetic as it is cemented in political sludge.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The group feel more at home with the methodology of early prog or post-punk, with a sense of the abstract rippling beneath those crystalline waves of perfect sound. Shine on, you diamonds.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may spend a lot of its time reflecting on the past. But as an argument for that now famous district in South Los Angeles and its continued importance and centrality to hip-hop, it’s forceful and convincing, and one that ensures those Hollywood-style ‘COMPTON’ letters will continue to loom large--not just over L.A., but over this genre as a whole.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a bold, idiosyncratic collection of songs crafted under intense time pressure after producer John Congleton insisted that Grant have all of the material ready to go before entering the studio. Such a challenge certainly seems to have focused the mind.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here everything seems whole and fully realised, the sound of a fleshed out band sure in its own identity rather than the end result of a prolonged mixtape crush.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's classic Americana rock at its best, combining musical echoes of Springsteen and Dylan but crafted with a poet's eye for detail. Dreamy, infectious, and full of hope. A powerful antidote to all those who say the best days of American classic rock are well over.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The Dreaming Room is an enormously frustrating record, as Mvula clearly has it in her to be an incredible artist. But at this point in her career, she remains a orchestra in need of a conductor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Adore Life sacrifices intensity for heart and with some exploration into the use of space and silence, it could be their perfect album. After all, absence makes the heart grow fonder.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where three years of agonised, vice-grip creation and destruction preceded Grizzly Bear’s 2012’s multi-dimensional effort ‘Shields’, the five years of space following has worked in their favour--leading to the conception of a creature that breathes confidently with a heavy sense of hyper-ambition in Painted Ruins.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The net result, a tapestry through dark alleys and along river banks, makes for an entertaining listening journey.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Overgrown remains closer knit, and paradoxically less fragmented than its illustrious predecessor, ideas rotating core values guided by an affirmatively unseen hand. Which ultimately makes this an even better record.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There is a modern, angry masterpiece in here--just skip the manifesto.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is labour intensive listening, but hard work reaps rewards. A gnomic, genre-busting album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With 37 previously unreleased performances, On Air Volume 2 is essential for any Beatles collector. For everyone else, it’s an informal insight into the world’s greatest group on the verge of an exhilarating ascent.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is the kind of record that inspires new listeners to explore unfamiliar sounds and musical histories; the kind of record that bodes very well for the future of British jazz.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A beautiful diversion then, rather than an eye-opening reboot or soul-stirring call to arms.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    They’re worth the minor missteps along the way.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album's ear-catching finish endorses Golden Ticket as a rewardingly receptive, slightly slippery customer to the death.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The result is an intense kind of dialogue between man and machine, and draws from the typically organic piano sound a new, otherworldly texture.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Taking his time, as much of the album does, is no bad thing when the melodies are this compelling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    To the uninitiated, this kind of '70s-inspired thrum-rock might sound a bit AOR, but given time it reveals its nuances, placing Vile somewhere between a rougher-edged M. Ward and a bluesy Ariel Pink.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On each listen Love What Survives is a record full of raw honesty, both musically and artistically, and is worth your undivided attention.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    What the album lacks in genuine surprises--it features fewer floor-filling basslines than its makers’ previous LP ‘proper’, 2010’s dance-designed ‘We Were Exploding Anyway’--it more than makes up for in comprehensive consistency.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The anthems are still here, rest assured; they’re less obvious, but definitely no less compelling.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Front Row Seat To Earth strongly standing as one of the year's most affecting and luscious releases.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Like acid (which, again, he never touched) this record is illuminating, often inaccessible, often scary and most people would hate it. But it's still one hell of a trip.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If you love the ambiguous crossover between half-step London sounds and crushed and warped 4/4 peddled by the likes of Martyn, Burial or Joy Orbison, then the love in you will find this album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    More Waitrose advert than classic Wrigley’s; the Black Keys’ raw power’s been polished. Some things are meant to stay rough around the edges.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The criss-crossing sounds better than ever, and is everything you’d want from a FaltyDL opus.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The real issue is that in a genre filled with imitators, many whom Deerhunter no doubt inspired, we need a bit more bang for our buck. When the oddities on this album ride so high they should have let complete weirdness take over.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This preference for impulsiveness and reaction off of one another when making their music comes through in the warm, emotive feel of the whole record.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a contemplative, confident record which will only strengthen with further listening.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It isn't just the narratives that feel more mature however, the entire composition does. Something which stems from its two individual halves.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a fully realised, sprightly rocking album that proves that sometimes musicians are best left alone to do what they do best.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The land may not currently be fertile in terms of crops but it certainly is in artistry, as there is a wild eclecticism and experimentalism here that touches the soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s a lot to like about this summer soundtrack packed to the left of your luggage.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'R.I.P.' is both an update on the bass explorations of restless Britain and perhaps a timeless thesaurus of blistered tones and ideas that younger producers will beg, borrow and steal from for years to come.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is music that’s meticulous and expansive without ever falling into the trap of being boring or self-indulgent.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    AM
    All of these stylistic inspirations make AM an invigorating experience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With a mix of frantic and scrappy pop songs alongside blankets of processed peacefulness Contra is a fun and always intriguing listen.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The swagger comes in the form of knowing your strengths and for Stern, she's put all of them on display with Marnie Stern.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sometimes uniformity is no bad thing at all--when you get the formula right, that is--and Guy and Howard Lawrence prove just that on their debut LP.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a document of four years of on-off collaboration it is fascinating, and for fans of either artist it's pretty much essential.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jardin is also no departure from Garzón-Montano’s first release, 2014’s EP ‘Bishouné: Alma del Huila’, but rather a continuation of theme and sound. Perhaps it is his self-imposed musical exile which has created a sound that some listeners may find repetitive whilst others meaningful in its persistence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Morning Phase is a return to the lovelorn introspection of 2002’s ‘Sea Change’--in style, if not substance.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the music of ritual, an electronic folk chimera of primordial pagan beats, ancient and timeless yet psychedelically futurist.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An electrifying introduction to the future of the blues.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The band’s dependable grasp of instantly joyous hooks still shows no sign of deserting them, and Britt Daniel’s raspy voice continues to marshal the tight groove at their core.... Only ‘I Just Don’t Understand’ hits a truly bum note, sounding eerily like Beady Eye.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bold, uncompromising and totally EE, A Fever Dream further cements the idea that the Manchester outfit will one day be considered as one of art-pop’s true greats.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Utilising his own crude, handmade instrumentation to full effect, Punish, Honey sees Vessel firmly digging heels further into his own brutally rewarding corner of noise.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Goon is not perfect, but it's the imperfections and the straight honesty that bleeds through it that make it so appealing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Disquieting divinity, duly delivered.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Potent in its masculine restraint, this record has surely always existed, just waiting to be plucked from the surf; a mercurial, magisterial, stick of seaside rock.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you’re after blunted beats and wordplay that reaffirms your belief in rap as urban folk music, then you’re in for a shock. But for anyone looking for a mind-expanding trip to the outer edges of the solar system, these rap futurists are your guides.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a record stacked with an adeptness of touch from a production standpoint, a modern tapestry that weaves in and out of genres defined by black artists of past.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Her second album is an enchanting collection of beautifully raw songs, the faint trace of tape-hiss in the quieter moments combined with the rootsy feel of songs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As unconventional in approach as ever, the set extrapolates from their previous ventures and results in a confident and competent continuation of established qualities.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result of two years of head-down studio time, the Brighton-based producer has laced this debut with heart-racing drums that trip over each other and dark-hued synth rollers.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A commanding and sincerely fascinating listen that stands tall in a catalogue already awash with magic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Meet The Humans is not just his best solo release to date, but also arguably the finest album in which he has been involved full stop. Capable of moving and energising its audience in equal measure, Mason has refined his art to a remarkable extent.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Strike A Match feels like it is racing against itself, a gentle, playful intensity that feels wholly inviting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sleaford Mods have managed to express perfectly and effortlessly, what it feels like to live in 21st century Britain and from here, they can only get bigger.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    His are fragile, beautiful songs floating over warmly alien, sometimes seemingly formless musical structures yet it's an effect borne through unconventional levels of space and patience.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's clearer now than ever that Earl Sweatshirt doesn't care for your expectations, and that he's at his brilliant best when refusing to cater to them.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A great album and a fascinating document undoubtedly, but there’s no need to spend your hard earned on a boxset when the original does everything you need already.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shadows returns to the lush, meticulously crafted sound of previous albums.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All ten tracks, and their accompanying dub allies, have the presence and sound to claim dancehalls by the fistful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a slow-burning, deeply resonant collection with a stirring potency and the capacity to truly wow.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's a clearly dynamism between the couple, resulting in a unified performance and all that lets them down is a weakness in some of the songs, where a greater commercial edge might have initiated more interest. Sophisticated Steel City pop.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's hyper real hip-hop made just in time for the end of the world.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Smith delivers a record that combines sonic punch with a nuanced and wide-ranging sound palette.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Although the second half of the record loses steam somewhat with a succession of slow R&B vocal numbers like ‘Your Space’ and ‘Feelings of the World’, Sounds of Crenshaw Vol. 1 largely maintains its coherence. Its slight messiness is representative of a life lived, something that in itself never coheres as a perfect narrative.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This may be the sound of an artist working with a formula: a formula that is certainly an effective, endearing one, but a formula nonetheless.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Lion's Roar is full of rich textures that unfurl around Klara and Johanna's bittersweet harmonies.