Rolling Stone's Scores

For 4,124 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 64% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Physical Graffiti [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Scream
Score distribution:
4,124 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Given one last chance to make an impact, Jay-Z has come up with one of the better albums of his career, though perhaps a shade lesser than his very best, Reasonable Doubt and The Blueprint.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the ballads... bristle with force. [28 Oct 2004, p.99]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album so disjointed that it seems to artfully fall apart as it plays.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Up!
    Up! would be a knockout even if it were limited to its one disc of country music.... But the second, relentlessly kinetic pop disc is a revelation.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the evidence of this excellent debut, few people can challenge Skinner right now except himself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yoshimi isn't the end-to-end triumph that was 1999's The Soft Bulletin.... But the production is equally ambitious, with burbling electrobeats underpinning sci-fi orchestrations that sound like the brainchild of Esquivel and the Orb.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Iowa is not just the first great record of the nu-metal era - it's better than that.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    But if you go back to Up after hearing Reveal, you get the idea that this is the album they were trying to make then, and that this time they got all the way there and found a parking spot. The Eno-style keyboard textures have more room to breathe amid the largely acoustic guitars, with the arcane sound effects intricately woven into the songs.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is loud, expansive, unrepentant Metallica.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kaplan and Hubley sing their most confessional, intimate lyrics ever, over whispery guitars, brushed percussion, vibes and organ drones. It's a spell of blissful, psychedelic make-out music... these songs are great - heartfelt, rugged, melodically sumptuous enough to keep unfolding after dozens of spins, full of folk-rock flesh and blood.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you want a vision of the future of hip-hop and techno, get this record.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's one of the best hard-rock CDs you'll hear this year, carrying on the shitkicking tradition of Hank Williams Jr., ZZ Top, Guns n' Roses and Bad Company.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Recalls Janet Jackson at her best.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is a rare, fine thing: the sound of the perfect A&R sales pitch turning into a real band.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Funeral aches with elegiac intensity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the group's fourth proper album, a mightier Mouse refine their weirdness and become a pop band while grasping at dark truths that pop ordinarily denies.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is grandiose music from grandiose men, sweatlessly confident in the execution of their duties.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So much of Tool's third full-length studio album makes so little sense at first. But that is one of Lateralus' most endearing qualities: It rolls out its pleasures and coherence slowly, even stubbornly.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Futureheads reclaim pop punk from the Warped Tour crowd -- and revive it in the process.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The rugged guitar tunes resemble a cow-punk update of the Clash, and Earle's song-to-song perspective shifts dazzle. [2 Sep 2004, p.142]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Neptunes' brilliant, impertinent, full-body funk is, for the most part, what stays with you from Justified; their songs, spacious and shot through with ecstatic aaahs, outshine their neighbors on the album.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Up All Night is a brilliant mod explosion of scruffy pub punk.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's an irresistible party: trashy, hedonistic and deeply weird.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eventually every song will kick in from a slightly different angle, including faux folk and cracked ballad.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wainwright's fanciful songs about love and faith place him in the rarefied company of Bjork and Brian Wilson, whose audacious Medulla and SMiLE his album most resembles.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A far more refined and finessed record than its predecessor. [14 Oct 2004, p.96]
    • Rolling Stone
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Encore isn't as astonishing as The Marshall Mathers LP. Few albums by anyone ever will be. But in the time-honored manner of mature work, it showcases a phenomenally gifted musician and lyricist doing all the things he does best.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He is, simply, better than any other MC in hip-hop except for Jay-Z.... The Marshall Mathers LP is a car-crash record: loud, wild, dangerous, out of control, grotesque, unsettling. It's also impossible to pull your ears away from.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eminem just may have made the best rap-rock album in history
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Thunder, Lightning, Strike was hailed as a pop masterpiece when it came out in the U.K. late last year, but clearing all the samples held up its U.S. release until now. Wait no longer.