The A.V. Club's Scores

For 4,165 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Life...The Best Game In Town
Lowest review score: 0 The Beginning
Score distribution:
4165 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Whatever the future holds, few bands fit as well into their time as the Blur captured here.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marries raw rock attitudes to the sonic spread and kinetic energy central to dance music.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's a chance to marvel at the record's sturdiness in spite of its sonic adherence to an extremely specific time in music history.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The majority of Monroe’s superb third album hunkers down with heartache and struggle.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Flying Lotus reaches into the past in order to create something clearly of the future – a hybridized work that challenges others to follow its dazzling blueprint.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    On an album that touches repeatedly on the barriers people build between each other, the members of Grizzly Bear have forged further ahead into sweet synchronicity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's more of a "real" record than McCartney, but it just as firmly rejects rock-star self-importance.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    LP1
    Few debuts possess such control and ambition all in one; LP1 is the rare album that manages to sound both lived in and completely futuristic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Steinski myth has grown in the darkness of bootlegs, but this long-overdue release proves that the reality more than lives up to the legend.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The end result is a warm, sometimes reckless, but always deeply moving and wildly creative effort that is absolutely dizzying in the best, most indelible sense.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A punchy and exciting debut.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It's a work of hushed intimacy and unabashed romanticism that uses synthesizers to create incongruously organic, natural-sounding grown-folks R&B.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The album is at once classic and modern, and while it's short on timeless songs like "Glowin'," "Loop Garoo" and "Mos' Scocious," on the whole it's a more engaged, eclectic, and ornery set than these types of revivalist projects usually are.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Extending his winning streak to five albums, he's become a paragon of quality and musical honesty.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chávez Ravine never romanticizes its subject. It simply makes it seem unnatural that any place where people lived, dreamed, died, and formed a neighborhood could be made to disappear.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The follow-up [to "Kezia"], Fortress, mines similar territory but cranks the ferocity even higher.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Some of the more on-the-nose satire falls flat....Still, heart-on-the-sleeve tracks like 'Losing You' and 'Feels Like Home' feature Newman at his most affecting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Empros doesn't just defy gravity, it defines it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    To those with time for only a passing glance, it could conceivably come across as dull, but a close look at monumental songs like "Start A War" and the scathingly sad, funny "Slow Show" will reveal bleak, black diamonds—precious, glimmering, and lasting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The White Stripes can create an ungodly amount of noise, and it opens White Blood Cells by doing just that. But it makes some of the most memorably melodic ungodly noise on the market.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As usual, the freshest-sounding songs are those that tread the farthest from Cohen’s gypsy-folk roots, but here that’s most of them, save the plodding thud of “Samson In New Orleans” and the lilting, acoustic “You Got Me Singing.”
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Complex and rewarding in a way that the telescoping salvia trip of An Imaginary Country never was, and tougher and more fibrous than the excellent Haunt Me Haunt Me, Do It Again, Ravedeath, 1972 somehow manages to soothe even as it disorients.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Song for song, this could be its best album.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sounds cranky, cynical, sentimental, and mordantly funny--in other words, like a good Warren Zevon record.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Some of the exposed-seam splicing sounds sloppy and/or twee, but the guys in The Books wield a solid musical hand over melodic figures that hint at swooning grandeur without falling prey to florid temptation.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A major album from a major artist, Soul Machine works with a sonic, lyrical, and emotional palette that encompasses everything from joy to rage.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    What he’s accomplished with Acid Rap is nothing short of remarkable: Just two years removed from high school, and with no label support, he’s crafted the most assured breakthrough Chicago rap release since The College Dropout.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They're also bracingly potent and screamingly vital; David Comes To Life is the work of a band openly aspiring to be great, and pulling it off.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Surf is so vibrant, so alive with triumphant vibes and unadulterated joy, that it never leaves any room for cynicism.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    As Dylan's official bootlegs go, this is one of the series' best.