The Guardian's Scores

For 4,352 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 A Grand Don't Come For Free
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
4352 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They sound like a band who think they've made the year's best rock'n'roll album, probably because that's exactly what they've done.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A patchwork of catholic musical influences stitched tightly together by one man's peculiar, expansive vision of pop: Soul Mining is a brilliant and very idiosyncratic album.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It all adds up to a landmark in American music, an instant classic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s fascinating stuff, even for those for whom a 37-minute version of Sister Ray is pushing it a bit. It’s actually where the band stretch out that it becomes most fascinating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is difficult to find fault with Blue Neighbourhood--it does what it does so well.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s revelatory to hear this most intense of bands playing with such ease and fluency, and utterly compelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While the music is eclectic and teeming with exotic textures, it always feels coherent and easy to love, and might even earn the band a nomination as Britain's Best Pop Group.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Intimate, intense and beautiful, You & Me demands repeat plays and the Walkmen deserve a new respect.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Its songs are not weighed down by the Evans concept, and are hugely enjoyable on their own merits.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The album is imbued with a post-9/11 dread, which deters Fagen from recycling the nostalgia and Lynchian fantasy of his previous albums.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is easily the equal of, if not superior to, its illustrious companion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    He's discovered a mellow maturity in Southern soul - and without losing his punk rock perversity or poetry.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    To say it's ambitious feels like damning with faint praise; its sheer musical scope--from the James Brown funk of Tightrope to the English pastoral folk of Oh, Maker--is spellbinding.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is late-night listening that pulses with pain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The female Mike Skinner? She's far, far better than that.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Weller’s renaissance has not come at the expense of his musical identity. The sunshine-pop haze of Phoenix is from the Tame Impala playbook, but you could imagine Style Council-era Weller singing it.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Every note, every lyric, is perfect.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Medulla may divide Björk's audience, but, combining intellectual rigour and sensual ravishment, it is brave and unique.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Ys
    It may well be the most off-putting album released this year. After playing it, there seems every chance it is the also the most astonishing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    His best work since the Clash's London Calling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    50 Words for Snow is extraordinary business as usual for Bush, meaning it's packed with the kind of ideas you can't imagine anyone else in rock having.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For all the 40-year-old reference points, Big Inner never feels like a pastiche; it's audibly more than the sum of its influences, in the same manner as Lambchop's Nixon.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As with Graceland, it's not scared to be too pop... plus the lyrics are of a sounder political hue than anything Simon essayed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Everything Changes and the agonised We Watch You Slip Away (written with Kate St John) are among the finest new songs I have heard his year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Doom has never sounded so good.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Young Americans and Station to Station are albums that make you wonder how Bowie did it, given the state he was in, by all accounts, when he made them. ... The Gouster feels like eavesdropping on a moment when he wasn’t so sure. It makes for fascinating listening.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    You listen to it and wonder how anyone arrived at the idea that this song should suddenly do that, struck by the delightfully confounding sound of pop music made by genuinely original minds.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    From the rock opera crescendos of the opening Node onwards, the album dares to be both a quintessentially prog-rock experience and a timely act of modern metal derring-do. Frontman Tommy Rogers’ effortless versatility has at last found songs worthy of his gifts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Pop is rarely as genuinely affecting, joyful or good as this.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is an African classic.