New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 3,844 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Is This It?
Lowest review score: 0 The Chronicles Of Life And Death
Score distribution:
3,844 music reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The ultimate rare treasure. [24 Sep 2005, p.47]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost cinematic in feel, much of The Hold Steady's genius lies in Finn's ability to craft songs that tell stories as wise, textured and three-dimensional as the nearest old oak tree. [13 Jan 2007, p.30]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ys
    Newsom has managed to lessen the twee factor of her last record... in the process crafting an album as bewitching as it is odd.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Many have tried to recreate the vibrancy and laidback groove of vintage soul-pop, but to absolutely nail it you need to be someone truly cosmic. Amy Winehouse just about managed it, and Matthew E White is one other such person.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A naggingly problematic record, with a void at its heart that no amount of cool celebrity mates can quite conceal.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Virtuosity and accessibility have never been easy bedfellows, but Strange Mercy is one of those rare albums that makes you think and makes you fall in love.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Few bands could explore motherhood and terrorism without making you want to shoot them: Corin Tucker's electric-shock voice and the adrenal guitars make them as essential pop topics as schoolyard crushes and backstreet drugs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Goddamn it's taken a while, but with 'High Violet' The National's slow and steady evolution can no longer be ignored. This lot are fully grown-up, coloured in and going overground.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are no real bangers here, but for once that’s not a disappointment cushioned by wafty ballads. Instead the low-key, moody production throws the spotlight on the words and the images brought to play by Beyonce as serious album artist, encompassing bulimia, post-natal depression, the fears and insecurities of marriage and motherhood, and lots and lots of sex.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His best yet. [3 Sep 2005, p.74]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's a set of two halves whose hands won't hold.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The clarity is chill-wave level rather than that of a tape that had been dropped in a bath, then dried with a hairdryer. And, more importantly, the songs sound better than ever.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Imagine 'Lost Souls' injected with Prozac and a huge dose of weird guitar noises that give you goosebumps from head to toe. That's 'The Last Broadcast'. It's one of those rare albums that makes sense first thing in the morning but you can still yell along to when your head's exploding.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As debut albums go, it's terrific.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bejar creates an astonishing world in just nine songs; it's his finest work to date, and excessive, but irresistibly so.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's easily the electronic album of the year, but for all that, it doesn't break particularly new ground. The point more is that what ground is broken is done so with exquisite artistry.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A miniature classic. [14 Aug 2004, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rossen is a master craftsman--and one of the best songwriters in modern rock--and with Silent Hour/Golden Mile he's set the bar tantalisingly high for Grizzly Bear's return.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Light Up Gold is one of the best debut albums you'll hear all year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shoegazing in origin, barn-storming in conclusion. [24 Jun 2006, p.43]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lee’s lyrics are sometimes sentimental to the point of potentially seeming trite, but they’re logical for a situation where love and pain have become so overwhelming that simple statements seem the most trustworthy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a world where a cheap squirt of brass is enough to equal "a new direction", the Super Furries' free-range ideas-farming is a vital antidote to the preservative-pumped junk that curdles music's bloodflow.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They're the sentiments and sounds of West Coast rock becalmed and quietened, stripped of fretwanking excess, and invested with a warmth that transcends cliché. A fortunate, if belated release, and a tragedy averted.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In ploughing a unique furrow in pop music, he demands your enjoyment as much as your respect.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A notch below the genius of 'Debut' or 'Homogenic' but precious nonetheless. [4 Sep 2004, p.73]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If ‘This Is Happening’ must be a parting shot from this smartest and most human of dance machines, it’s a fine one. Though by LCD’s own standards this takes second place to ‘Sound Of Silver’’s unquestionable gold medal, by any other current band’s measure this is an all-out classic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Drawing influence across the board, it's a work that not so much mixes genres as smashes them into one visceral, jaw-dropping hybrid.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This time around, Beam is less like some dungaree-wearing, O Brother, Where Art Thou? throwback, and more like the natural - and, frankly, wonderful - successor to the Elliott Smith and Nick Drake school of perfectly beautiful songwriting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Fortunately the ponytailed Dane has a distinctive voice that’s both tough and vulnerable, and enough personality in the four tunes on her debut EP to stand out from the crowd.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They have pulled off another album for the modern age, and its stories live in all of us.