Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 6,525 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Exile On Main Street [Reissue]
Lowest review score: 0 Liz Phair
Score distribution:
6,525 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    If Blood Mountain, their brilliantly upsized and unrelenting third album, doesn't confirm their position as the greatest big-time metal crew on earth, I demand a state-by-state recount.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Roots and Crowns is bluesy and soulful without reverting to revivalist schtick, and experimental without relying on blind cut-and-pasting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    An astonishingly good late-period record from Of Montreal that's as uncomfortably savage in its depiction of breakup psychology as it is relentlessly catchy.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Phrases like "rare talent" are thrown around all the time these days, but this compilation makes painfully clear just how unique and valuable this music is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Despite its density (they fit worlds into just nine songs), the album remains exciting and accessible, albeit highly sobering.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    While it might not be as substantial a record as we're used to hearing from him, it is his greatest leap forward, and further proof that few are as skilled at tracing out the complicated contours of pride, success and ambition as he is.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It helps that Labor Days is as terrific a record as anyone could ask for, really, and you should buy it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    But for now, basking in Pink's riptide, Wata, Takeshi, and Atsuo are 2006's balls-out riff-makers to beat.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Lie Down may be Oldham's most country record of new songs in years, and it's also one of his most accessible and least academic records.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Instead of hiding his bootleg-bred quirks in anticipation of the big-budget spotlight, he distills the myriad metaphors, convulsing flows, and vein-splitting emotions into a commercially gratifying package that's as weird as it wants to be; he eventually finds his guitar but keeps the strumming in check.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Nothing to Fear might be the surprise highlight of this collection, even accounting for all the classic stuff on the first disc.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    If Brighten the Corners signaled a turn to the serious, the 32 outtakes and radio-session cuts compiled here give Pavement plenty of room to, as one B-side aptly puts it, "fuck around."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    xx
    It is so fully formed and thoughtful that it feels like three or four lesser, noisier records should have preceded it. The xx didn't need a gestation period, though xx is nuanced, quiet, and surprising enough that you might.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Catharsis is Stickles' fuel, and The Monitor is a 65-minute endorsement of angst and opposition as the best way to present that combustible sorrow.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The album sounds ridiculously heavy, with many songs-- including the gurgling "I'm Slowly Turning Into You" and the Dusty Springfield cover "I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself"-- easily trumping their studio counterparts.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    High Violet is the sound of a band taking a mandate to be a meaningful rock band seriously, and they play the part so fully that, to some, it may be off-putting. But these aren't mawkish, empty gestures; they're anxious, personal songs projected onto wide screens.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The combination of the music's essentials-- jackhammer riffs clipped from punk and metal, mid-tempo beats from hip-hop and electro, and supremely catchy sing-song melodies-- is striking on its own, sounding remarkably fresh and unlike anything else right now. But an even greater source of the record's appeal is how it doesn't sound especially referential.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Love Remains, because of its construction, feels like music that comes from inside, as if the act of listening completes it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    With Body Talk, Robyn ups the ante for pop stars across the radio dial and raises her own chances of appearing on yours. And for all her three-album talk, she never forgets that cardinal rule of showmanship: Always leave them wanting more.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    If Broken Dreams Club is indeed an honest glimpse of what's ahead, it sounds as though Girls have much more to give.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    This reissue of Peace Sells, celebrating a quarter century of Megadeth's second but first truly great album, is probably more a sop to those diehards than anything else, but if it turns one curious party into a convert then it's worth it, even in this time of bald cash-grab reissue ugliness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Real Estate have such a knack for classic-sounding melody that every song quickly engages on a musical gut level.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Parallax feels like a more complete work than any other Atlas Sound record, with the differences between the songs less distinct and everything flowing together more naturally.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    The Drexciya reissue rightly returns the spotlight to the original electro's signature rhythms and analog palette.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Never before has his music possessed this much majesty, this much command, this much power.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Death Grips appeals to the knuckle-dragging troglodyte and the smirking smart kid in us: thick-headed goonery and bookish, viscera-free nerdiness, making beautifully misanthropic music together.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It's not just a collection of hits; it's an album, one that gives the project's familiar nocturnal foreboding a new sense of grandeur.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It's one thing to be heavy, and it's another thing to be hooky, but Slaughterhouse is the rare garage-rock album to do both so well simultaneously.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    It's the headphones album of the year from a producer with a long history who has come into his own.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    Though the songs themselves are wonderful, that's the powerful source Powers taps into here: if you feel like the dark center of the universe or simply need a little space, Wondrous Bughouse obliges.