Slant Magazine's Scores

For 2,224 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 None Shall Pass
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
2,224 music reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I'm Not Bossy is sonically diverse, but rarely do the songs give O'Connor the opportunity to flaunt her impressive vocal range or, aside from closer "Streetcars," explore the more intimate side of her still-striking voice.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Even in their diminished current form, Basement Jaxx still have a facility for turning pure cheese--dusty pianos scales, boilerplate diva-soul squawking, and tacky synthetic brass sections with "Yamaha" stamped on the side--into unabashed cheesy fun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Moonshine in the Trunk is a mostly upbeat, feel-good summertime album that largely minimizes Paisley's tendency toward hokey power balladry and whatever the hell "Accidental Racist" is.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Seen It All doesn't show Jeezy evolving into anything he hasn't already been, but it does crystallize his place in the pop-rap pecking order.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Single Mothers is at its best when it's at its most deliberately spare.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    From the nails-on-a-chalkboard solo of "Sleep Like a Baby Tonight" to the whining guitar strains of "Every Breaking Wave," the Edge's melodies and atmospheric licks are the real star of the album, which is otherwise marred by the kind of slick MOR pablum that plagued the band's last few efforts.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    ["New Dorp. New York"] lends a refreshing dose of personality to an album that's otherwise stoically straightfaced.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Art Official Age's main takeaway is that His Royal Badness has started to make peace with being past his prime.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Interludes were employed on Janet's best albums to segue between an array of themes, genres, and tempos; here they're just used as atmosphere, to create the illusion of an album that's larger than the sum of its parts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, 24 Karat is stuffed with too many stately piano-and-guitar ballads that return to the same theme of bygone romance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bombast, buoyed by self-doubt, gets in the way of the finer sentiments, especially in the album's over-inflated middle. But subtle pleasures can still be found.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    "212" along with an upgraded version of Fantasea's "Luxury" are among the best songs here, but their inclusion is distracting, representing more unpursued directions for an artist who needs to be looking toward the future, not cramming in old material on an already overstuffed album, one which feels more like a drastically updated portfolio than a proper debut.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If the album means more in that context than it does outside it, the same could be said of the geographical significance of the historical tragedy it's memorializing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It isn't more than the sum of its highlights, but on the surface, it's fun. Like a diary written in a bunch of different, eye-catching fonts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A Better Tomorrow mostly proves that, no matter what conflicts may be simmering, there's enough sustained talent at work here to keep the usual material feeling fresh. It's forays outside that established template that make for the worst moments.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Whereas the Duke represented the pop icon's most aggressive experimentation with composition and style, Manson appears content simply to polish up the usual antisocial stompers.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    When the singer finally begins to emote dynamically in the album's second half, that's also when Vulnicura's musical foundation comes apart.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Clarkson has been mining this territory since before Swift even landed her first record deal, and songs that should ostensibly inspire nostalgia (like the pointedly titled aerobics workout "Nostalgic") instead feel like they just rolled off a conveyor belt.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Where Kintsugi falters is in its sacrifice of momentum for structure.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Where once we got shivers up our spines from this band's music, now we're just left cold.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Doesn't stray far from the formula that brought her moderate success her first time out.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The truth is that any Weezer copycat band could have made this record.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The Invisible Invasion isn't necessarily a bad record, it's just nearly critic-proof, providing all of the evidence for whether or not any given listener will like it entirely by its many points of direct comparison.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Be
    Each neo-soul nod to the R&B sound of Detroit, immediately post-Holland-Dozier-Holland, sounds more claustrophobic and limited than the last.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For the most part, what was once electrifying is now stripped of almost all of its energy and novelty.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The preemptively defensive album's biggest problem is that it's surely nowhere near as interesting as its yet-to-be-recorded post-slammer follow-up will be.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    I Am Me isn't half bad--but it's only half good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It sounds better than any album that begins with background vocalists crooning "Moooo…moo-moo-moooo" probably has any right to, and contains at least a couple lo-fi AC ballad keepers.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    RAW is considerably more consistent than its predecessor, and it's not a bad listen by any means, but for all the so-called weighty subject matter, there's not much meat on these bones.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    First Impressions introduces some subtle new colors to the band's musical palette... but the pervasive sense of inert boredom, which has been noted as a strength in the past, is difficult to shake.