Village Voice's Scores

For 764 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Naked Truth
Lowest review score: 10 God Says No
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 48 out of 764
764 music reviews
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whatever it was supposed to achieve originally, right now SMiLE sounds like a beautifully modulated, funny, sometimes unintentional meditation on a failed United States and counterculture, and the lost paradise, real or imagined, of Southern California, and the collapse and reinvention of the male ego.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    When talking about an album as multilayered, thematically diverse, and sonically rich as OutKast's Stankonia, though, the best thing is to boil it down to its essentials, its influences, its approaches. You know, the uppercase conceptual stuff. This album, the acclaimed Atlanta duo's fourth and best, contains so many hummable hooks, so many snap-your-head beats, so many break-'em-out-and-talk-about-'em metaphors, that it's easy to get lost in the sauce.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kanye is rapping and singing better and with more tenacity than he ever has on Fantasy, but also less often, wisely allowing others to speak for him-every single guest artist on this album senses the moment and rises to the occasion.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The voice you hear on "Love and Theft" is not that of the cocky young rock star who wrecked folk by simply strapping on an electric guitar, nor is it the vengeful and crotchety man who dripped Blood on the Tracks. This Dylan is older, wiser, and grousier, but sweeter, more sanguine if still unsettled too.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    When Dizzee thinks very deeply--worrying about growing up, about those around him who won't grow up, about dying before he grows up--he sounds like, what else can we call it, the real thing.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where Dre twists Prince remnants to his own astroboyish amorous ends, Big Boi holds up OutKast's P-Funk revival tent.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Original Pirate Material is England's first great hip-hop record mostly because it isn't a hip-hop record. It's hard to say exactly what it is.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Funeral is a remarkable record, hard to hear at first, then hard to stop hearing.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The resulting, mercifully final product is, as you might have suspected all along, fantastic, by turns triumphant, defiant, and gleefully crass.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Album number five dwarfs its predecessors because the members have started treating this group as the sun around which their musical projects must inevitably revolve, and the home to which they must return.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Make no mistake: Hell Hath No Fury is a major event.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like a great romance, it's consistently lovable even when stupid or frustrating, and its best moments are absolutely breathtaking.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The stupendous Destroyer's Rubies, recorded with a full, swaggering band, is maybe his best and certainly his least theoretical album.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Previous albums have never quite captured those onstage moments when the power they generate seems to catch them unawares, but on The Woods you can hear not only the deliberation in Weiss's eyes as she ponders the exact placement of beat and crash, or Brownstein's bedroom-mirror rock-star poses, but also the stunned grin Tucker can never contain after emitting her most gravity-defiant shrieks.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ghost's Fishscale is the most creative album to come out of New York hiphop since his own 2000 Supreme Clientele.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Phrenology reveals pulsating growth--a surprising bump on our skulls that some didn't feel before, while others banged their grapes wishing for it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    this time, she has found a middle ground therein, an appropriately murky backdrop as she channels another of her early inspirations: Bob Dylan. Like vintage Bob, Shake pores over history's indignities with a fine-toothed comb.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Vernon seems torn between selling his lyrics and using his voice as just another emotional cue in the thick mix. But if you're looking for an album to get lost in, who knew a guy previously feted for stripped-down "realness" would provide the year's best?
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    SFA uses 21st-century tools to achieve pop timelessness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rook is great, with an emotional clarity and narrative acuity that makes it one of the year's most rewarding listens.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Each of these songs offers more exquisite details than I could earmark in twice this space, many of them literary, which the English prof's dropout son rightly claims as his calling. But secret brilliance is more likely to emerge from the sops to his hip-hop base.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The title track and "Waltz" bookend Extraordinary Machine. Both excel, set to Brion's signature command of crisp, idiomatic, Van Dyke Parks-influenced Hollywood symphonics. But the Elizondo-Kehew tracks top them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A magnum opus four years in the making, We Love Life is, like This Is Hardcore's epic cold sweat, a disco-nnection record, well stocked with mis-shapes, mistakes, misfits. But Pulp's glamorama has never tingled so invitingly, thanks to the full-body massage administered by producer Scott Walker.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Some of the best country rock in over a decade.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fagen's triumph of rendering post–9-11 New York most recalls how perfectly Steely Dan caught LA on 1980's 'Gaucho.'
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Blacklisted is soaked to the bone in rueful wit, luxurious miserablism, and morbid cold sweat—c&w virtues too often reduced to self-pity by lesser latter-day sweethearts of the rodeo.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Yes, it's as good as the last one, maybe better.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Part of what makes Of Montreal notable is the quantity of things Barnes does impeccably.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Collins's way with a hook has blown up into a stack of tunes that stick, ranging from cranked-up faux-arena rock to spine-shaking rhythm and staccato bounce.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It remains to be seen if The Lady Killer will continue his hot streak, but it should-it's one of the best records of the year, and also his most commercial, and that's not an insult.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The man has an uncanny ability to transliterate the sounds only record collectors can hear--early Thin Lizzy, for instance --into a passionate ache anyone can love.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Easily dance record of the year, Confessions is an almost seamless tribute to the strobe-lit sensuality of the '80s New York club scene that gave Madge her roots, which she explores with compelling aplomb.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes Antics such an improvement over Bright Lights is how capable Interpol have become at complementing Banks's lovely ambiguity with an increasingly precise post-punk throb.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A Dante-channeling journey through the many diverse facets of hip-hop.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This time everything has coalesced and expanded, double the propulsion, twice the emotional range, the beats doing the ping and the boomerang.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Youth & Young Manhood is 2003's finest rock debut.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No, local slump-spotters, this isn't the Yeahs' Room on Fire. Far from it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Listening to this thing is like watching a pitcher throw a no-hitter.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Take Care is a carefully crafted bundle of contradictory sentiments from a conflicted rapper who explores his own neuroses in as compelling a manner as anyone not named Kanye West.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Fey, coy, yet rich and deep, track after track on Broken by Whispers emits an exacting, well-crafted melodrama. Subtle electro touches only add to the wondrous acoustic guitars, wondrous and breathy declarations of love, and wondrous early morning seaside atmosphere. Those who balk at dreamy-boy nakedness will want to skip the bathos, but such people are called Americans...
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The most penetrating and engaging album of their career...
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kaiser Chiefs flow so well that even given the nonstop electro-like riffs, hooks, and knowingly cornball solos played by guitarist Whitey, the songs as a group can over-egg the pudding as only powerpop can. But as a record-making matter, Employment is nearly without flaws.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The ever increasing variety in Eminem's voice (drawled Southern-bounce cadences, impatiently curt throaty staccatos, flat Beck-like deadpans, crying and screaming) somehow feels completely conversational, and the musical backdrop (calypso/Caribbean, Gothic etherea, jiggy disco evolving into P.M. Dawn) is frequently, of all things, beautiful.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A flat-out incredible live recording... it's Underworld as nonstop high, a disc that for 75 minutes keeps seizing and re-seizing the air.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A Mark, a Mission, a Brand, a Scar will be the album of the Indian summer, warm and wistful all the way through.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their stupendous debut full-length, The Fool, triangulates Moon Pix–era Cat Power's ghostly, morbid, gorgeous bedroom folk with the Slits' lithe, muscular post-punk.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The music turns Aja's fusion-pop mode jumpier and snappier, sourer and trickier and less soothing--postfunk, whether anyone will admit it or not.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The mightiest alterlatino album in many years. The sound is more rock-oriented and vibrant, and the band has actually learned to write songs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A masterpiece showcasing Thorn's voice, songwriting, and taste.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Arab Strap mix the stoic, set-permanently-at-dawn folk whispers of last year's Elephant Shoe with the beat-friendly sense of their best early singles: "The First Big Weekend," "(Afternoon) Soaps," "Cherubs." The music sheds its amateur charm for the sound of a band in control of its art and its drum machines.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album's darn spooky good... Shelving the old Green Day wall of guitars (Dookie and Insomniac) in favor of the youngest (and best) Pete Townshend mod-clanky buzz opens up the band's sound dramatically; it's airy and spacious, lots of room for the vocals. The whole thing breathes with neat ambiences.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Try This dares Pink's huge but hardly guaranteed audience to hear the world her way--without wasting one moment on indulgent experimentation, rote grandstanding, or retreats into conformism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    An easy contender for best rap record of the year.