Wall of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 232 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 29% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 92 Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia
Lowest review score: 20 When It All Goes South
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 2 out of 232
232 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    That Sylvian has managed to fashion his extensive career into a fulfilling double disc is impressive enough. But the fact he manages to do so while still coming off as a vibrant, vital artist -- some 22 years after making his recorded debut -- is what makes Everything and Nothing especially exquisite.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A sonic extravaganza for effects-loving headphone devotees, Amnesiac is another Radiohead effort that requires a bit of a leap to get into but is pretty unforgettable once you're there.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Moves with a quick tempo that whips through the album's 15 songs and assorted skits.... There's something innately joyous about many of the group's songs, whether it's how the J5 MCs play verbal double-dutch over the pulsating "Jurass Finish First" or the assembly of sampled snippets that drive the playground anthem "Monkey Bars."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Nicks' sixth solo album is her strongest since 1983's The Wild Heart.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    You Had It Coming stands as his best work since 1989's Guitar Shop.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Plaintive, nakedly honest lyrics collide with keen observation... an hour of enrapturing atmosphere.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    These 14 tracks forego the polish that distinguishes today's chart-topping fare, but each one bristles with a frisson in which honesty and artifice fuse, fashioning an enduring mini-masterpiece of pop.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Parachutes is a fully realized and expertly crafted masterpiece, each song holding its own quite well, but when grouped with the rest, they make up an impenetrable fortress of sadly beautiful, melodic, glorious Britpop.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Saratoga, however, reaches a whole other level. A truly excellent show, it features a wonderful extended version of "Daughter," an absolutely kick-ass rendition of "Even Flow," and Vedder's most consistently strong singing throughout.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    As expressive as Hammond's guitar work is on signature songs like "Heartattack and Vine," it still has a sweet sound, and that, too, is mostly a new context for Waits' songs. The horror and the hardness is less immediate, slightly more mannered.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    The concept album is more than an afterthought, it's musically revelatory and one of the best records of the year.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    A welcome antidote to the hard rock and bubble-gum pop flooding today's airwaves.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Enter Faith and Courage, an album that reclaims O'Connor's status and stature as it presents us with a kinder, gentler, and matured artist who still sings like a wily archangel and writes with passionate, purposeful clarity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    [Glen] Ballard's production, arrangements, and co-writing duties have massaged the 12 songs into a searing rock album.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    As always, Alvin's guitar work is wonderfully supple and emotive, and stands out as the centerpiece of his arrangements. But, even more gratifying, a decade after leaving the Blasters, in which his brother Phil handled the vocal duties, Alvin has finally found his voice as a singer.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Maroon is BNL's grown-up album, still full of clever wordplay and winking couplets, but also dealing with dark and sometimes disarming matters of adulthood.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Unlike the then-career-spanning three-CD set Live 1975-1985, which was notorious for its sanitizing overdubs, Live in New York City for the most part captures the feel of a live Springsteen show.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Yet for all its adrenaline-rush thrills, the RFTC sound is also surprisingly complex. Like Phil Spector's '60s pop masterpieces for The Ronettes and Righteous Brothers, the sonic density of Group Sounds is actually composed of virtuoso performances and subtle nuances...
    • 79 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Now, as the group starts its third decade, U2 has found what it's looking for is good music, songs that ring with melody and hooks -- and meaning -- while still weaving in some of the ambient and electronic textures it explored on releases such as Achtung Baby, Zooropa, and Pop. The result is a richly crafted and filler-free pop album on which each song sounds like an individual work, calling to mind mid-period Beatles titles such as Rubber Soul.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    A mesmerizing 13-track suite that ebbs and flows with a continuous hallucinatory lushness from start to finish.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Working from a crate stuffed with quality cuts that blur the lines between trance, techno, and tribal house, Oakenfold deliberately showcases selections that err on the melancholy or contemplative side... Contrasted against the sometimes formulaic feel of Oakenfold's other comps, this is a stellar reminder of why he's remained a superstar for so long in a genre that's notorious for its short attention span.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It's not precisely rock and roll, more a summary of the stylistic fusion that has evolved over his last five albums: unequal parts rock, bluegrass, folk, Irish, and punk.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Haines' secret weapon lies in the hands of vocalist Sarah Nixey -- a cross between Olivia Newton-John and St. Etienne's Sarah Cracknell. Her singing style supports Haines' music with a deceptive beauty, as she wraps her voice around lyrics that belie that sweetness.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A 79-minute sonic sojourn of hard rock delivered with an arty, fusion-conscious sensibility rooted most obviously from the likes of Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and Jane's Addiction.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    On the group's first live album --a two-CD set recorded during triumphant return shows at London's Wembley Arena this summer -- however, the maturity that has started to pervade their personal lives, and Noel's music, is evident.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Van Helden's compositional modus operandi doesn't vary much between the 11 tracks, but it's a combination that rarely fails to deliver a knockout punch. He introduces one element -- a vocal snippet or a jazzy drum break -- and milks it for a spell, before introducing a contrasting timbre. The two begin to climb in and around each other, as Van Helden tweaks and twists various effects, bringing the music and momentum to a dizzy, unsettling pitch.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    An energetic and ambitious collection-
    • 67 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Building on Whitey Ford's organic folk-pop rap, Eat at Whitey's develops the songwriter's street-style troubadour fixation even further. This time, there's more singing than rapping, and his gruff vocals actually sound stylish, especially on the provocative "Black Jesus" and the memorable "Black Coffee."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    The result is not only a more ambitious album than one might have expected, it's also a substantial step forward from Urban Hymns, the Verve's own crowning achievement.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 82 Critic Score
    Peppy but relaxing chill-out tracks as sweet, shiny, and peculiar as its memorable moniker.