Blurt Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 1,384 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Give a Glimpse of What Yer Not
Lowest review score: 20 I Declare Nothing
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 7 out of 1384
1384 music reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While the band may seem more aware of emphatic expression overall, many of the melodies maintain the anthemic perspective that ‘s always been so inherent and inspired.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eighteen tracks, usually a sign of a group that could use a little outside help cutting some of the fat, proves that the band was just hitting it’s stride. Eighteen songs and No Holiday still leaves you craving more.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Man, is this ever drenched in heart and soul. The first time I heard it, several months ago, I muttered to myself, “Think this gonna be in my top 10 of 2019.” ‘deed it is, folks.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though not as great as their last few albums of all original songs, Play The Hits is still a fun holdover until the band comes back with another record.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Neko Case’s moonlighting from her solo day job allows her to enliven the proceedings, it’s obvious that the ensemble, as a whole, contributes to the richness and resonance that the new album exudes in its entirety.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Where The Action Is may not be the absolute rave-up the album title implies, but it is a remarkably incisive effort that ought to remind one and all what a singularly important ensemble the Waterboys were… and still remain.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music is superb, but it’s Mead’s subtle, witty lyrics that really take center stage on this record (like all his previous solo offerings).
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are some songs that sound like they were last minute add-ons (“Alchemy” is so plodding you can almost watch time stand still), but taken as a whole, Fool still finds Jackson playing some of the best pop music out there, immune to fads and current trends.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Far from sounding like lesser cast-offs, the songs here are just as worthy as anything off those earlier albums.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Sometimes older and wiser just makes you harder and meaner. I Used to Be Pretty is the grungy, gangly, glorious result of hard-won maturity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    In the best cuts, the dance elements win out over doom-y post-apocalyptics. “AS A.W.O.L.” layers metallic-ringing keyboard notes (like a music box made of tin) over a sinuous, vaguely ominous beat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a combination of old and new, letting Liddiard play to his strengths as a writer while letting a new band paint his compositions in different colors. That blend of comfort and risk makes A Laughing Death in Meatspace one of the best rock records of 2018.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band’s Miami mix of Folk, Rockabilly, Jazz and Blues-based Holiday music is simply divine.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Probably not the best soundtrack for you Christmas Eve Open House, but destined to be a Holiday classic for Crowell diehards.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There are a couple of stumbles here, like on the somber “Easy Love,” but for the most part, Late Riser is crammed with stunning songs strong enough to make you forget what else is going on in the world--at least for 30 minutes or so.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Not all the songs on Hardly Electronic are as affecting--and some of them are just good bubbly pop fun. There are some misses--the country-ish “Bye Bye Crow” isn’t very good--but most are at least solid and surprisingly fresh, and a few are much better than that.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Stokes lacks Barnett’s songwriting diversity, worldliness and clever wordplay; too many of the songs on Future Me Hates Me are interchangeable, built on quiet, jangly verses and fuzz-button sing-along choruses that lament the usual litany of “I” and “me” woes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This latest album is still a fair amount bubblier than early works, with the electronic part more prominent than on Mother’s Daughter or Good Arrows, yet it has the same recognizable magic as Tunng’s best work, in hectically complicated arrangements that melt into simplicity and sleek modern surfaces atop centuries-old modalities.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Returns to Valley of Rain, then, is a start-to-finish delight. It’s technically a re-do of the original UK cassette version of Valley of Rain, which had 11 tunes compared to the 10-song US LP.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Animals reminds me of Lanegan’s work with Isobel Campbell, more acoustic, less bombastic, less ready to take you by the throat than his solo albums, but nonetheless quietly revelatory. It’s hard to tell, really, where he leaves off and Garwood steps in, but that’s because they’re so well matched and equally focused on a singular, spooky vibe.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Perhaps because there’s no bass (Primo! has added Amy Hill on bass since Amici), Primo!’s sound lacks a certain grind and tumult--it’s more Grass Widow than Good Throb--but it’s sharp and fresh and a lot of fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While there are some great intimate moments (especially the beautiful “Wayward”), ultimately that lack of a more consistent balance between upbeat and slow tempo drags the album down a bit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    To The Sunset becomes a new plateau in a career that’s grown steadily and assuredly since the start. Indeed, its importance ought to grow over time given its unabashed enthusiasm and its unabashedly seductive set-up.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s obvious that a trip up to Memphis was just what the doctor ordered, as it most certainly has injected a new, creative energy into the band. Of course, the chemistry imbued by the helping hands and producer were significant to the end product.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The one thing missing from Dude, The Obscure, are a few more raucous, upbeat tracks, but that can easily be rectified with a new Diamond Rugs record.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Blistering, incisive and occasionally even surprising, Endless Scroll is anything but dull.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    V.
    The band is tight, and the music ebbs and flows as usual; it just doesn’t go anywhere original. I hope the band will be able to right the shjip on their next effort.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    However carefully crafted the words or melodies may be, there’s an air of anything-can-happen to Frog Eyes songs. They are certainly always haring off in unexpected directions.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album flush with both vicissitudes and vitality, What a Time to be Alive resonates with its resolve.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shook’s unerring insurgence and commitment to the cause are admirable traits, proof that edge and attitude never go out of style.