Dusted Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,936 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Ys
Lowest review score: 0 Rain In England
Score distribution:
2936 music reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Feorm Falorx may have some of the duo’s more simplistic songwriting, it’s well worth a spin for its textural delights alone.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The studio can be the bane of a musician’s existence, offering a plethora of ways to work, often to the point of stultifying any interesting end results. This is not necessarily the case with Nace, but it begs the question of what stood between the more interesting work on this album and the pieces which seem to be caught under the inertia of their own weight.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album seems like a simple, straightforward work, yet every song carries fitting surprises within its construction. ... It’s the singer’s own version of reality, but it probably isn’t that far from whatever’s actually out there. If it’s a little bent and a little brighter at the same time, it somehow only feels truer.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The fellows in Chat Pile still need to figure out how close to the bone of the Real they want their music to cut, and how best to achieve that. But many of these songs lacerate with convincing passion and rock with memorable ferocity.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Shaw’s vocals as the pivot, Dowse, Maynard and Buxton flex, weave and dance around her, resulting in a nuanced listen that extends the band way beyond their pigeonhole of “post-punk.” Hard to pinpoint where Dry Cleaning belong now, which can only be a good thing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, The Elephant Man’s Bones is a step back for both the artist and the producer. ... A generic Alchemist production makes for a generic Marciano verse. In short, there is no chemistry between The Alchemist and Marciano. ... The Elephant Man’s Bones sparks hope in the middle with “Quantum Leap” and “Bubble Bath” but after that it regresses again into a second rate lounge-y Marciano.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In the end, though, it is all but impossible not to come away from this album with a grin like Marshall Allen’s. The positive vibrations in the studio are evident, and the musicianship is, naturally, of the highest order (including Allen’s wailing alto).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Rolling Golden Holy is more comfortable and assured than its predecessor, but not as eerily evocative. If the self-titled was a twilight vista full of mist and longing, the follow-up ambles through sunny backroads. It has a bit more Johnson, a bit less Mitchell in its mix, though the two artists find intriguing common ground on multiple occasions.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Beths took the path of being exactly who they’ve always been, but more intensely and immediately. Given the interruptions, they waste no time in getting going.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s a nice way to spend three-quarters of an hour, even if you don’t have much to say about it afterwards.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The majority of the first half finds Ejstes at his most melodically direct — including singles “Nattens Sista Strimma Ljus” and “Skövde” — while the second half indulges some questionable studio experimentation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His songs flash by in vivid, disconnected mental images, floating on an underlying current of mood. What we see passes by. What we feel about it lingers, evocatively, just out of reach and often filtered through digital mechanisms. ... The album’s lyrics are about all kinds of things, but its sound is about being isolated and frightened with contact only through digital interface.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Orcutt builds musical structures layer by layer, part by part. These compositions are sometimes jaggedly ecstatic – “Or head on” for one, leaps and lurches with joy. As in any congregation, sometimes a delighted, discordant, untrained voice rises in volume above the rest.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In times of uncertainty, you might very well look to the music Anderson interprets—folk, blues, gospel—for reassurance. But the uneasiness works its way in, even to these lovely songs. Anderson captures that conjunction of solitude and stress, of beauty in the moment and angst about what’s next, in a way that reflects very clearly on the last couple of years.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    These songs have a dream-like, airy quality, despite the genuine rock fire power that Why Bonnie brings to the game.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You can hear the impact of the pandemic in this latest album from No Age, not in the recording, which sounds as assured as ever, but in the bouts of introspection, the intervals of lyricism, the sweet haze and jangle of home-cooked rock. Spunt and Randall went inward, not out into the world, to find a different way to sound.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The tunes tend to unfold at mid-tempo and with the logic of a short story as, once more, Jones composes and performs, with seeming effortlessness, a set of memorable melodies that reward repeated listening.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite its uneven presentation, Someday is Today is a beautiful, evocative record, whose charms invite and reward repeat listens.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs are direct, sometimes stripped down, but the components are robust, clear and smartly mixed. They sound like Osees.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As ever, he refuses to offer any easy answers, leaving the listener beguiled.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Success is a fine example of Oneida’s willingness to fly in the face of fashion and once again reinvent themselves.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even the soccer dads and middle-management types might find themselves nodding along to lyrics like, “It’s losers all the way down, stay undefeated.” That’s from the album’s flat-out banger, “Wage Wars, Get Rich, Die Handsome,” a sing-along celebration of nihilism that pounds and punches and exults in itself.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though the album is closed out well enough by the droning “Atomkerne,” it’s “Be a Pattern for the World” that leaves a lasting impression.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Every sound is thrown like a punch, rocking you back with sheer bludgeoning impact. The sound is instantly familiar, though surprisingly hard to pin down with punk antecedents.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s an eccentric mechanical universe that Kamikaze Palm Tree has constructed and well worth visiting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Everything Was Beautiful isn’t some showy highlight reel, though; it’s an example of how keenly Pierce has honed his inner space rock and how much room it still has left to soar.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Kode9 fans will enjoy club ready tracks like “Uncoil” and “Lagrange Point” and as with his previous work, the mastery of dynamics and the production values are to rights but there’s a sense the music cannot carry the weight of its associations alone.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music sometimes meanders as perspectives shift and but Barbieri’s juxtapositions of church and club in which transcendence through music can be both a public and intensely personal experience is never less than transporting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The interaction between machines and the power and tone of branch’s trumpet is the core here and the duo play off each other with unerring control and infectious joy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Such clear chemistry and inspired interplay will hopefully lead to future releases in the same vein. Anyone with a penchant for classic-sounding ambient electronica with a kosmische bent will find plenty to nod along to here.