Pitchfork's Scores

  • Music
For 11,963 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 41% higher than the average critic
  • 6% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Sign O' the Times [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 nyc ghosts & flowers
Score distribution:
11963 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 62 Critic Score
    Yes, girl in red is capable of another skin-deep album about crushes and self-doubt. But it would be far more interesting to see her attempt sincere emotional depth.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    There’s nothing woefully timestuck about these sensitive dance songs, though. They’re made by someone living passionately in the moment and rushing into the future at breakbeat speed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Cummings linked with Topanga Canyon vintage king and session ace Jonathan Wilson, who freed her to focus on not holding back. That is commendable, but it results in an album that has the dynamic range and limited application of a strong flashlight. You recognize its incredible power, but you’d do best not to stare into the source for very long.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Don’t Forget Me is, in many ways, its inverse: It inhabits parties and frantic nights out, yet the tracks carry the steady, guitar-backed propulsion of a road movie. Rogers, at last, sounds sure of her destination.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The incarnation may be new, but the music’s underlying spirit, its animating force, is very much the same.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    In A LA SALA, each member of the trio has several opportunities to shine while making each track sound individual, and it all comes together cohesively because Khruangbin know where their strengths lie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 68 Critic Score
    The strongest songs sparkle with a morose charm. On “Dumb Guitar” and “Shipwreck,” Balency-Béarn’s plainspoken singing wafts over murky lounge-pop, giving The Sunset Violent some much-needed friction.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The Libertines may be running low on originality, but they can still produce a strong tune when the muse strikes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 81 Critic Score
    It’s astonishing what he can do with so little. Marci keeps ample daylight between the instruments in his beats, leaving plenty of elbow room for his incredibly dense writing. He’s in top form here, spinning superhuman mafioso tales from impenetrable thickets of rhymes that contract and expand like gasses changing form.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 62 Critic Score
    Interplay does just about enough to keep everyone happy: Shoegaze fans get a sonic-cathedral finale, while Ride follow their creative whims. Without many truly great songs, though, Ride might have been wise to play to their strengths, rather than coveting someone else’s.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 72 Critic Score
    The Black Keys who, after 23 years together, know themselves well enough to know how to accentuate their strengths by choosing the right musician for the right song, confident that they’ll wind up with a record that sounds unmistakably like themselves.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    As the geometric tones of closer “Take Me to Your Leader” blip and fold into themselves, it becomes clear that, short as it is, Exotic Birds of Prey still has the loose and expansive feel of a radio show. There’s no easier way to visit outer space.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s fascinating to watch Shakira take big swings and extend her dominance, but there’s a little piece that’s missing: some small token to show what made her such an icon in the first place.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 86 Critic Score
    Only God Was Above Us is also the most honest album Vampire Weekend have made, an encapsulation of what the band does best, melodic and abstruse in Koenig’s own masterful way.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    Ultimately, the release of The Carnegie Hall Concert feels right on time, providing a welcome jolt of focus to a widespread impression of Alice Coltrane that’s started to seem just a tad vague. .... As this set shows, she always contained multitudes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 59 Critic Score
    If it’s a bid for dance-pop stardom, then the big singles—finely crafted though they are—are too few, too timid. If it’s meant as a deep-house long-player, it’s paddling in the shallow end.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Evolution’s fatal flaw is conflating being ubiquitous and being generic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Critic Score
    Where experimental music often favors gnarly harmonies and knotty melodies, Moran’s approach is more subtle. Moves in the Field shows us that technique doesn’t need to be showy or daring—without sacrificing rigor or heft, it can also be tender.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    By using country as a starting point for experimentation and recalling genre-porous artists like Ray Charles, Candi Staton, Charley Pride, and the Pointer Sisters, Cowboy Carter asserts Beyoncé’s place in this long legacy while showcasing the ever-expanding reaches of her vocal prowess. .... Her magnitude tends to cast a shadow over everything before her, no matter the medium. The side effect of this is that some of Cowboy Carter’s songs feel small and ill-suited for Beyoncé’s stature.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Akoma radiates cool, simmering control. There’s never any doubt that each percussive element and textural glint has landed precisely where Patton intended, yet this samurai-precise music is as unpredictable as a shroomy Ricardo Villalobos odyssey.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 73 Critic Score
    Bite Down is at its best when Rosali complicates an idea rather than simply circling it.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The terrain is familiar but Tyla is playful within it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    None of it’s bad, sometimes it’s good, but why now? .... They take the easy way out by evoking past memories rather than building new ones. Understandable because remembering the old days is pretty sweet, well, until it hits you that they’re gone.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For Your Consideration thrives on the elasticity of the human voice, while its lyrics turn from underhanded lovers to the flush of new affairs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 71 Critic Score
    Real Power plays like the jovial, carefree sound of friends enjoying each other’s company; they just happen to have instruments in hand.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music—bubbly, nebulous, free—seems to have a mind of its own.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Ultimately, what’s different about Glasgow Eyes is not the form but the tenor. As they advance into middle age, the tension between the Reid brothers has dissipated, giving Glasgow Eyes an unusually congenial spirit.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Her mind is alive and humming, and her language leaps out at you with its hunger.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 84 Critic Score
    The free-flowing and intuitive nature of the sessions is apparent in the recordings, which have the amiable looseness of first takes. You get the sense, sometimes, that they are figuring out a song’s ideal arrangement as they track it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 49 Critic Score
    Everything I Thought It Was brims with a misplaced confidence that can only be described as Timberlakean, laboring for such a long, long runtime under the misapprehension that a risk-averse mop bucket of last decade’s trending sounds is gonna hit through the sheer force of its performer’s waning charisma.