Consequence of Sound's Scores

  • Music
For 2,248 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Tomorrow's Hits
Lowest review score: 10 BAYTL
Score distribution:
2,248 music reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There is no question that this album is a game changer. It's Kanye West's greatest work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    James Blake is an essential for anybody interested in witnessing how pop music can and will continue to change, progress, and grow into something new with time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This is the best album for 2011, and not just the last two months.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's easy to lose yourself in the countless studio takes. Little gasps of pure genius here and there. The slow dissolution to it all. The echoes of things to come. It's a history lesson come to life, and that's part of the reason the collection here works so well.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    While that record [Pomegranate] was expansive and full of divergent genres and characters, This Is Our Science condenses the process into a tight 40 minutes of rhythm and revelations.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It shows that the Some Girls era was, and remains, one of the most productive of the Stones' career.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There's more than enough here to disavow thoughts that this is a needless cash grab by Corgan.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Even though other recent interviews and richly realized tracks like those imply that Ocean's songwriting is just a vessel, his own devil is still in the details, and that's what makes his music compelling.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    We now have an album from him so masterful that it'd be greedy to ask for much more.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness doesn't need rose-colored lens for appreciation. The album's success still lies from all the stylistic risks the band assumed, especially in comparison to music other alternative bands were creating at the time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    m b v creates a new timeline for My Bloody Valentine, and one that recalls the past in a broader and bolder light. They’re better for it, their catalog is stronger for it, and by album’s end, they’re still the best at swirling guitars.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What makes Rumours so remarkable and relevant is that it remains fragile and passionate 35 years later.... From a historical, archival standpoint, this package is extremely valuable, as Rhino left in the studio banter and rough cuts from the recording sessions; you get to overhear Fleetwood Mac as they make the record.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Yeezus feels very proto- something, the roots of some aesthetic that has yet to be minted. It’s revolutionary at its most urgent, as on “Black Skinhead”.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The 2013 remix is a bit of a wash, if only because the album already sounded great.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Tomorrow’s Hits doesn’t boom like The Men’s early material (namely, 2010’s Immaculada and 2011’s Leave Home), but it’s more rousing instrumentally than last year’s New Moon.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The more you spin it, the more you wear out that thin needle of your record player, you realize that Granduciel is discovering the problems of his life, not figuring them out or even reflecting on them. This all makes for an album that truly sounds like it’s coming to life.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Twenty minutes of pedal-to-the-floor, tension-igniting rock ‘n’ roll can just be too much in most hands, but Here and Nowhere Else condenses these moments into more reasonable servings that are successful across the board.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As perfect as Illmatic is, there are plenty of crevices that can be explored and different musical avenues to test Nas’s verses/scriptures.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In spite of everything that Oasis would become on record, on stage, in the tabloids, Definitely Maybe stands above it all.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The characters and artifacts that surround these songs feel artificial, like stock props, but the music that Del Rey pulls them through splits them open, shakes them to life.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Although it’s admittedly a patient listen, Warpaint plucks at a different petal each time through it in its entirety. It’s truly a triumph for a group of women whose colors are singular and run incredibly deep.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    With the stunning Burn Your Fire For No Witness, she deftly captures the terrifying dread of being in limbo, stuck in the sludge of a transitional period. But even with the existential doubt, the loneliness, and the angst, there’s still a resilient beacon of hope.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Her biggest fans may prefer less direct writing, but it makes St. Vincent her most widely appealing album to date, an infectious work that doesn’t ever feel like a compromise.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s something special, just like it was always planned to be.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Mirrors, cameras, and lenses are all over Drop, an artistic statement that effectively functions as a screen.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The music might seem cold, but when you’re surrounded by it, enveloped in it, it can keep you warm, too, like a glacier cave or an igloo.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    To Be Kind does as much soul exposure lyrically as it does musically, Gira’s simple, howled lines finding the vein incredibly easily.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In Conflict is ominous, gloomy, and marked with some of the most playful arrangements Pallett’s laid to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Are We There functions best as the portrait of an artist coming into her own, while hopefully putting some of her demons to rest.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Led Zeppelin I is a fantastic glimpse into the time capsule, a standing testament to rock pageantry.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    LZII could’ve used a live version or two to highlight the energy of the late ’60s--an era that remains especially mythical for those of us who weren’t there. As a two-disc set, though, this reissue is both a reminder of the original album’s wallop and a closer look at the alchemy of a band increasingly attuned to ideas of progression.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While not the towering achievement of its brothers in numerology, Led Zeppelin III remains one of the great albums in rock and roll history, significant for its role in establishing the legend of Led Zeppelin that would become fact with Led Zeppelin IV.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where the freewheeling Benji painted lyrical autobiographies in painstaking detail and Are We There dove headfirst into dark and sometimes overpowering emotions about toxic relationships, HEAL is a mixture of the two, a cleansing document that’s ultimately more hopeful.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It’s all at once contemporary enough to thrive in a market that demands constant innovation, yet nostalgic enough to shepherd the spirit of a bygone era on which the genre is founded.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Channeling the traditions of Southern music without getting caught up in it, Lateness of Dancers proves the genre’s vitality.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Dude Incredible, however, is also one of their most direct albums, the nine songs holding that same menacing gut-punch, despite that highfalutin thematic unity.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They [Ghostface and Wu-Tang Clan] are truly a hip-hop enigma, and Apollo Kids is just another piece of proof.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a high-personality disc, one that avoids cliches and cheese while also being steeped in tradition and an immense dose of adorableness.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Kaputt is the sort of record that arrives only once in a while: an expansive world that captivates you from beginning to end, impresses you with its self-awareness and cohesiveness, then releases you from its grasp when it's all over.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In fact, it's very hard to determine what the actual standout from this album will be, because literally every track is full to the absolute brim with the genius of seasoned veterans
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Anyone can recreate a sound, but Yuck succeeds where most bands fail by digging under the surface to capture the spirit and magic that made the music of their beloved idols possible.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This complete command over their craft really sets these Orange County natives apart, resulting in the kind of record that grabs you at first listen and becomes more meaningful every time through.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    To date, the Foo Fighters have never tried to reinvent the wheel, per se; they just want to keep it rolling. And that's just what Wasting Light does. For that purpose, Foo Fighters give us a solid record from open to close. The drought is over. Rock is back.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whichever route you choose, one thing remains unflinching: this album is guaranteed to please.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's an album that makes you sad that it's not longer; sad that it can't just go on forever. This sentiment alone should indicate the caliber of album Fleet Foxes have created in Helplessness Blues.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Director's Cut can be seen as new work, because some of these songs are very different to their earlier versions in tone and scale; both sets of work are equally brilliant, but here there is even more clarity of purpose,
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a shoo-in for being a timeless great, no matter what we say. Vernon's got the magic touch. But it's lacking that original sense of urgency that flowed so freely in and out of For Emma, making it so genuine and so incredibly listenable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their sense of naked honesty makes them so vulnerable that it is hard to believe they put it down on record, but that is part of their intriguing beauty; their willingness to fall is because they are pushed by the hands of true experience, and they also create the softest of musical landings for themselves and us.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    4
    Between doing more of the same old goodness and boiling everything down to its most essential lethality, Beyoncé also makes room on the album for more grandiose tracks that would sound right at home in Broadway musicals.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While instrumental, the recurrent use of a glistening fanfare motif, present across the album's six tracks, gives these pieces a much stronger sense of cultural and biographical identity than most vocal music.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Every number attempts something at least a little differently, and succeeds for the most part.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At this point in their career, Loewenstein and Barlow had found the perfect balance between their creative powers, and it shows quite brightly on Bakesale. To that end, any amount of extra proof that Sebadoh can dig up to prove that point should be welcomed happily.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even without the bonus disc full of rare goodies, this remastered version of Lifes Rich Pageant is required listening.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Equal parts futuristic space jazz fusion and hip-hop that does well to bridge the seemingly disparate corners of Thundercat's sprawling resume, Apocalypse is one of those rare modern jazz records that's remarkably unpretentious without having to cheapen the daunting complexity jazz is noted for.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With each album, her willingness to push the envelope in both halves of the equation grows, as if she trusts her audience to in turn trust her enough to follow her further along the path.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album's use of vocal samples, something less prevalent on Resurgam, feels incredibly fresh, and produces some of Fever Dream's best moments.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though Biophilia is hardly easy listening, even by Bjork's challenging, outlandish standards, there's little doubting it'll stand as one of the more rewarding albums of her storied career.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Going back to the well is generally frowned upon, but given the depth of Waits' well and the crispness and vitality drawn from it on Bad As Me, it hardly seems to warrant criticism that he has chosen to rummage through his past and revisit what he never had the heart, or mind, to throw away.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Musically and lyrically, Achtung Baby sounds as fresh and relevant as it did 20 years ago.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What makes Parallax a fully realized album is, in contrast to its compact musicality, the expanses and voids Cox explores.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Part Lies is a goodbye to the fans who have been around for years but a hello to those who missed out the first time 'round. And that is all truth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gambino can really rap. Scratch that; he can really, really rap, plus sing and emote and put on a show better than 90% of his hip-hop counterparts.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While looking for 50 Words For Snow, she has found 50 other original ways to express herself effortlessly, creating another intriguing piece of work.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's pretty impossible to be disappointed with the result here: crisp remastering of the original 10 songs, plus 18 Gish-era tracks, demos and live versions, many of which are being released officially for the first time here.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This collection captures a beautiful set from a legendary group that remains vibrant and continues to look forward into the future.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The service Temporary Residence Limited have done in making these nearly lost classics available again is downright admirable, turning out a set that's a must-have for post-rock fans.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With Attack on Memory, Baldi's never felt more alive or more authentic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Despite all of the weirdness, this is a band that deserved to have their story told, to receive mass attention rather than merely cult status, and this box set should achieve that.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Dedicated to the late Vic Chesnutt, Mr. M will stand as one of Lambchop's finest, most cohesive, and easiest straight-through listens yet, despite its intermediate tendencies.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sleigh Bells take one of the most confident and surefooted steps forward a band could take for a follow-up album, eschewing the storied sophomore pitfalls in favor of a sharper, fuller sound.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sweet Heart, Sweet Light covers a broad aural spectrum from surrealistic haze to outward pop and as such, is some of Jason Pierce's and Spiritualized's best material since Ladies and Gentlemen.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like Icky Mettle before it, reminds modern listeners of just how unhinged their sound was, especially when compared to those that came after them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With Kill For Love, it almost feels like the man's true thesis, as if he's strung together all his ideas, feelings, and sounds into one colossal being that acts less like an album and more like a highly organized archive.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bloom culminates six years and three albums of anticipatory ache with subtlety and meticulous song placement that unfolds if you let it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where Post-Nothing melts into a hazy dream, Celebration Rock does exactly what it claims to do-it burns on and on like the best sort of party.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    No matter how far into the ether they push, no matter what new form their music takes, there is a core Liars sound, and they've never sounded more aware of that or as ready to take on the challenge of reaching into that center.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Idler Wheel succeeds in creating a singular world more daring than any of Apple's previous records and one of the most daring pop records in recent history.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While the highs last time around ("Slow Burn," "This Ain't A Scene") still feel a bit higher, Twenty Five, even while it grasps at noise and disorder, comes together as a fully formed, mature statement of an album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Women are all over A Thing Called Divine Fits, but at its many hearts the record celebrates "a very brotherly" relationship.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This album redefines Swans by gathering the best of its past and re-centering the music on impulse and interplay, built with a preternatural sense of how long to let a section develop before moving on to the next idea
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sun
    Transformed in both sound and spirit, Sun is a passionate pop album of electronic music filtered through a singer-songwriter's soul.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Big Inner is a brilliant debut, brimming with homages to pop music's past, whether it be Motown or Randy Newman.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A revitalized take on noise-rock that honors the originating genre while eschewing its occasionally stifling boundaries.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Shields growls and purrs in ways Grizzly Bear has never before.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    All We Love We Leave Behind stands tall within Converge's discography as yet another glowing example of how to make art out of aggression.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Where Minaj is fantastical and over-the-top, Haze is understated and raw.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Resounding with enchanting vocals, a distinctly dusk-singed ambience and a keen precision thanks to its percussion, Blue Lines transcends the spills onto the dance floor and tinny thumps from laptop speakers, possessing a cosmic ability to remain a masterpiece 21 years after its release.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hummingbird proves that these guys are maturing into a sound that's both singular and wrenching with severity.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mountains is a simple name for a band. But it's also an utterly mysterious one that stretches implications across eons. In the right setting, Centralia just feels that deep and rich.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Honeys is 36 minutes of an excellent band doing what it does best, approachability be damned.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Richly arranged, masterfully sequenced, and full of brooding, Push the Sky Away combines the stately beauty of The Boatman’s Call and No More Shall We Part with the intensity of Grinderman/Lazarus-era Cave while managing to sound like neither.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sacrificing recklessness is different from sacrificing passion, and New Moon cements The Men as one of the most exciting rock acts today, no matter who they’re listening to or, most importantly, who they’re redefining.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Spaltro pleads and howls her way to the crux of the matter, finds her own way out, and leaves a poetic map behind for the rest of us.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an album that provides tangibility to an incredibly complex feeling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Learning how to untangle one of the richest experimental albums of recent memory becomes a challenge well worth the undertaking.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Its ambrosial melodies and austere instrumentation edify his canon of work, which has long been rewarding for its risky sensibilities and perseverance. Yet that’s what makes Wakin so curious; it’s Vile’s most derivative record to date.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Vol 3: To See More Light is his strongest and most cohesive collection in his career, aided in large part by the head-turning vocals of Justin Vernon, who appears on four of the 11 tracks on the album.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Already so many people have been championing 2013 as the strongest year for music in recent memory, and they’re not wrong, but here’s an album that has the punch and wit to stick around with the best.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Time, life, death, religion, New York City, and New York money are big topics to tackle in a 45 minute pop album, and Modern Vampires doesn’t even attempt answers to the questions it raises. Instead, it’s content to expound upon the Vampire Weekend aesthetic in inventive, imaginative, and undeniably successful ways.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s approachable without compromise and confident enough to be itself, not another Alligator or High Violet, but unmistakably from the outset Trouble Will Find Me.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Slinky enough for the club, down-tempo enough for a rooftop soiree, Settle traverses boundaries and expectations.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sunbather is a developed, mature, and, above all, an original statement that truly lives up to the unbelievable amount of hype it has earned.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nearly every song embodies this symbiotic relationship of adolescent daydreams and the ominous real world, as if each tune was its own coming-of-age novella.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Simply put, they’ve evolved from a hype band to something much more coveted: a great band.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nothing Was the Same wrestles Drake’s successes with his ever-lingering insecurities, and like some of the best music, we can see ourselves in these songs. It’s an exhilarating change of pace for the genre.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    R Plus Seven might be the first album to crystallize the simultaneous joy and terror inherent in a life of constant connection and constant surveillance.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    At this point, Win Butler is rock ‘n’ roll’s Christopher Nolan, a hyper-literate artist who crafts reliable, intelligent, and challenging blockbuster events that sweep our minds away. With the 85-minute Reflektor, he’s taken his most creative risks to date and at the cost of simply trusting what he sees, who he knows, and where he wants to go.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They’re challenging listeners to look at music and dance with a completely renewed lens, to forget what was normal and move on with an urge to protest what’s formulated. Admittedly, that’s a frightening and difficult feat, but also unforgettable once accomplished. One might use the same descriptors for Psychic.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The succinctness of the record creeps up on you, making it dissolve through your fingers in an unexpected way. But, maybe that’s part of the appeal, the desire for more that it leaves behind, a heightened hunger for baroque-tinged indie pop.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Stripped of vocal harmonies and electric guitars, the unadorned, raw songs feel unguarded and painstakingly earnest. The sound quality is impeccable on every single track, and Young’s voice has never been more emotionally charged.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The band sounds more energized than they have in years.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It is an album you should breathe, if only for one play.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Making pain sound pretty and poetic is a tough tightrope to walk, but Kozelek once again takes all the right steps.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Morning Phase makes for an interesting return to form.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    While much of contemporary folk lacks the political bite of Woody Guthrie or Pete Seeger, Segarra, who identifies as queer and listened to Bikini Kill growing up, brings a progressive and empathetic mindset.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The chords and arrangements on Atlas are the densest Real Estate have ever attempted, shading their sunshine into something palpably more mysterious, like a sunset in inclement weather.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Hardly a cookie-cutter pop voice, she’s brash but not abrasive and can be sultry without being hammy. Those songs showcase the versatility of her croon, while also updating the pop ballad form with Vindhahl’s metallic, glitchy production.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Piñata comes with just enough to reduce the daunting 17-track length to a non-factor, although it drags a bit with overt nostalgia toward the fourth quarter.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s Album Time finds Todd Terje shattering dance music stereotypes.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Future’s sophomore LP is a raw interpretation of his heartfelt musings filtered through an audio processor and laid bare at the intersection of trap rap and synth R&B. It’s a fascinating foray into alternative trap that ambitiously pushes the limits of self-expression and transmission.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Turn Blue, though, is the sound of Auerbach and Carney eagerly and grandiosely taking things into their own (and, if you want, Burton’s) hands.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Refractory Obdurate sounds a clamorous warning that something is nigh. Rather than a direct message, Edwards offers only a shatter of brimstone pieces.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Overall, Do It Again feels like an exploration for all involved, and even manages to address gender politics in discreet but intriguing ways.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Even if the method of delivery is not the most effective, it’s a positive thing for both artist and listener to be pushing further, trying harder, and exploring uncomfortable, new terrain. Ignoring that would be a mistake.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There’s little that’s playful inside Superunknown. It sounds more like Black Sabbath running for their lives, about to crack under the pressure, but then, at the last minute, escaping--and thriving.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    They’ve always done an exceptional job of bucking irony and sticking to their own earnest agenda, and this latest effort is no different; you’d be hard-pressed to find anything within a stone’s throw of a radio hit among these nine tracks, but you will find a smooth, almost flawlessly cohesive whole.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    This is a moody, angry, and soulful export from what modern anthropology insists is a happy-go-lucky area--Denmark.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    When you listen to 1000 Forms of Fear and hear the real pain in her beautiful, guttural vocal hiccups, it doesn’t feel like a voyeuristic experience but, rather, like an old friend’s new hurting or your own past mistakes.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Alvvays has legitimately great songs, boasting sharp lyrics, comforting arrangements, and tics that give their music personality that can’t happen too deliberately.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Whether or not you’re willing to put in the time, Lese Majesty holds attention as soon as opener “Dawn in Luxor” kicks in. That’s plenty to like.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It’s not as fun as 2007’s Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga or 2005’s Gimme Fiction, but it’s just as punchy, while also sticking with the ambition that made Transference arguably so intriguing despite its muddled demeanor.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    LP1
    LP1 isn’t anything revolutionary; it’s a frankly expressed project focused on the dualism between love and lust, reality and fantasy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Despite its title, which could suggest some sort of nostalgic exercise, Experiments in Time succeeds because it’s not concerned with channeling any particular time whatsoever.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    All of these techniques--the streamlined mixing, the honeycombed harmonies, the poppy sci-fi synths--build a sonic unity made all the more bright when surrounded by the irreverent lyrics.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Part of the success of After the End lies in its seamless and smart sequencing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Channeling profound loss, once-buried emotions, and a stronger sense of songwriting, these Staten Islanders have created something cathartic, life-affirming, and important.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    His new album and second with Chicago’s Bloodshot Records, The No-Hit Wonder, is brimming with vivid and infectious songwriting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Mean Love is all about precision, be it in the form of a buttery vocal hook, an elastic bass line courtesy of Ish Montgomery, or a poignant lyric co-written with Greg Lofaro. In other words, it feels like this journeyman has finally arrived.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Though the overall sound of Ryan Adams may be a mask, hiding lyrics that are every bit as heartbroken, confused, lost, and struggling as ever.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The resulting sound pieces are still intricately weird and weirdly intricate, and if Anchor sacrifices some of the hushed intimacy of a Books record (see: Zammuto’s self-consciously rock delivery on “IO” or the raw and lurching snare sound on the great “Sinker”), it retains the promise that anything, and any sound, is momentarily possible within these musical boundaries.