Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 3,360 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 18% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Tell Tale Signs: The Bootleg Series Vol. 8
Lowest review score: 0 Playing With Fire
Score distribution:
3360 music reviews
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    His latest sounds happier, and it’s still steeped in the Southern mythology that’s his forte.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Somewhat less focused and intense than much of their earlier work, their latest falters when it reaches for subtle musical textures. [9 Nov 2001, p.110]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With these 17 tracks, Ocean shows himself to be one of pop’s foremost innovators.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Cave spits out his woebegone lyrics as if he were a Holy Ghost-filled preaching machine leading the world's funkiest revival meeting.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Grohl can bestow headbanging muscle and arena-sized scope on this four-track EP without belying Brown's bluesy, twangy roots. [20 Dec 2013, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Despite the heavy feedback and punishingly sharp sadness lurking beneath tracks like "Pagan Baby," "Bathin' in the Fuss," and "The Drones," they still dabble in radio-friendly sugar without ever weakening their teeth. [16 May 2014, p.64]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Even the moments between the standouts float by with a strange beauty. [3 Oct 2014, p.69]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A perfectly imperfect set, it's looser, blowsier, and more what-the-hell? than anything she's done.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Just plain beautiful... carefully harmonized vocals and pellucid guitar hooks that rarely lapse into merely languid melodies. [2/16/2001, p.98]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    These aren't "duets" but exercises in sublime harmony. [2 Nov 2007, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The group is malevolent and charming at once, still a beguiling combo. [21 Sep 2007, p.82]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's a headphones album in an age of radio singles; a bravura live performance that stands out against pro forma knob-twiddling; a jazzy disco attack on the basic house beat; a full collaboration at a time when the superstar DJ stands alone. It's also quite moving; melancholy runs through every song.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    In the bleakest songs, the polyphonic swirl of strings, horns, and voices... points toward transcendence.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    ''Yankee Hotel Foxtrot'' is a subliminal album. Spin it once and it barely registers. Play it five or six times and its vaporous, insinuating, rusty-carousel melodies start to carve out a permanent orbit in your skull.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Lovely, heartbreaking, and just diffident enough to get perspective on this bittersweet old world. [26 Sep 2003, p.94]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Not all of the experiments work, but drummer ?uestlove's Clyde Stubblefield-cum-Chemical Brothers grooves and rapper Black Thought's mighty flow never waver. [29 Nov 2002, p.106]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Annie Up is a more fully formed take on Southern sisterhood.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The band certainly aims for transcendence on The Suburbs--a work of impressively fervent majesty.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Fans will adore the numerous B sides and demos, and the concert DVDs provide a fun, flannelly time capsule.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's the showcase of a confident singer successfully diversifying. [9 Feb 2007, p.72]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    He shares [Elliott] Smith's gift for sketching in complex emotional states with telling details. [19 Mar 2004, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Kala is propelled by genuinely stellar moments. [24 Aug 2007, p.133]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The Welsh quintet's concept-album ambitions are undercut by inherent goofiness, especially when the band parodies Robert Johnson (''Golden Retriever'') and Iron Maiden (''Out of Control'').
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It’s one of the year’s strangest albums, but some of the oddball arrangements work: On “10 d E A T h b R E a s T ⊠ ⊠” Vernon fuses Chipmunk soul with a booming low end to chilling effect. Still, he’s at his strongest when he keeps his outré inclinations in check.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There are three new songs, finished after this year's Collapse Into Now, and folky highlight ''We All Go Back to Where We Belong'' suggests that ­Athens' finest had more sweet jangle left in 'em.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Great remixers, like great ballad interpreters, take songs to wildly unlikely places while respecting the material. [14 Apr 2006, p.85]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Harvey uses the bright grooves to present her grim thoughts on the world's armed conflicts. It's a hoedown for the end of civilization.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While Sound of Silver still delivers terrific buzzy dance-space jams ... it also contains wispy hints of New Order and Bowie... and Murphy's best song-making efforts to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Spectacular Swedish import Robyn continues to languish in the cult-act remainder bin, but these 15 excellently curated tracks (culled from three 2010 EPs) deserve to change that.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Ironically, while this is Welch's quietest album, with nary a drum or electric instrument in earshot, it's even closer to the spiritual vicinity of rock.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The old formula, while rootsy, gains much from the injection of variety.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Overall, the album is strikingly intimate.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    On Bon Iver, his second full-length, an emboldened Vernon achieves a beautiful fantasy all his own, backed by a full band and buoyed with horns and pedal steel.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The venerable hip-hop band's first effort since joining NBC's late-night lineup delivers all the funk/soul/jazz vibes fans have come to expect.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    References to that style [Morricone’s sound] may have become cliché, but Kiwanuka personalizes it through the individuality of his melodies, the dynamics of the instrumentation and his lyrical point of view.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A startlingly accessible, possibly even pop-friendly effort. [3 Oct 2014, p.69]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It exudes enough confidence to let his heart show and to let his music grow in any direction his muse demands.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A sprightly psych-pop disc overflowing with exquisite melodies and cooing female voices. [14 Apr 2006, p.86]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Fantastic all of the time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Bar rock for the smart set. [3 Jun 2005, p.82]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Over Process‘ 10 songs, Sampha executes a sonically adventurous vision that’s entirely his own and builds on his enormous potential.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's not all darkness: The Brighton, England-based quintet offers enough straight-ahead rockers to keep the CD from turning into dirge overkill. [Oct 2003, p.95]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, that extraordinary core is at times marred by forced eccentricity.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Full of exuberant, childlike pastiche pop. [7 Oct 2005, p.76]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Parkway didn't take Fountains of Wayne to the charts, but let's hope the Interstate will. [13 Jun 2003, p.92]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    She's as comfortable sighing like a muted horn as she is wailing in big-band fashion--though it's the infusion of tenderness in her homespun tales that seals the CD's lasting appeal. [3 Sep 2004, p.74]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    45:33 deftly segues from the smooth funk favored by Levan to synth-pop and Talking Heads-style polyrhythms before opening into serious space-party territory.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    On Platinum, an old-school country wisecracker that's one of her all-time bests, she's funny as hell.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Unites the club and indie-rock crowds in ways few have attempted since the '80s. [25 Feb 2005, p.100]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Yoakam's first release in seven years is a smashing return to form. [14/21 Sep 2012, p.141]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The album continues where 2010's Diamond Eyes left off, bonding streamlined mosh-pit daggers with floaty space-station distress calls. [23 Nov 2012, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    LP1
    She exerts enough of a magnetic pull to lure listeners into some challenging territory.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Songs full of Sergio Leone set pieces and Mexicali blues. [14 Mar 2003, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Stone Rollin' is old school for sure, spun fresh.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Wisely keeps things short, sharp and shocked. [19 Nov 2004, p.85]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    There's no denying the vintage voodoo--or the palpable disgust--the Doctor summons with Dan Auerbach of the Black Keys.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It seems like ideal film-soundtrack music, except that its gargantuan beauty would probably overwhelm any image you'd match it to. [Listen 2 This supplement, Dec 2003, p.18]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Winding through the psychedelic title track, the ''Rubber Soul''-ish pop, the garage rock, and the lovely ''Eire meets Tennessee'' ''The Galway Girl,'' ''Blues'' is his musical road map.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A ghostly meditation on the culture of forgetting. [8 Jul 2005, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The stunning title track proves that Newman, at age 64, has more healthy bile in him than 64 twentysomethings....Harps has a couple of duds, though. [8 Aug 2008, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    In wedding bluegrass with the Appalachian sound of her youth, Parton, who wrote half of the material and reprises her classic ''Down From Dover,'' repeatedly explores her favorite theme -- romantic betrayal -- and turns in a powerful performance, augmented by the best of bluegrass' hot pickers
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    If The Wind is unsentimental, it's also happily unhygienic, sounding as ramshackle and energized as you'd hope a nothing-left-to-lose last blast would. [5 Sep 2003, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The forays into "soul"... sparkle, as do his playful raps. But boast-heavy collaborations with Timbaland and Ludacris drag things down. [19 Mar 2004, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Excitingly, Tell Tale Signs jumps decades ahead to offer an alternate history of a less leaky period: the creative renaissance that started at the end of the 1980s and has been bearing fruit ever since.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's fine for what it is, but someone decided to spice things up with annoying snippets of film dialogue, which help to derail the flow.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Old soul and country records hover like guardian angles over trim, unhurried tunes... [14 Sep 2001, p.94]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    His follow-up is his most adventurous collection yet. Over 13 tracks, he unspools anthemic power chords, swaggering horns, and gimlet-eyed tales of his journeys around the world.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Peaks again and again. [11 Feb 2005, p.63]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    His sentiments rarely transcend the boudoir--and listeners lulled by the album's unvaryingly sleek, high-gloss beats may just drift off to dreamland before they get there.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Stranger to Stranger is, finally, Simon’s most interconnected work, a self-contained world unto itself full of backing tracks that wind up in multiple songs and recurring characters (“the Street Angel”) who pop up in unexpected places.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's all ­gorgeous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Moving futher away from her early alt-country sound has sharpened Case's songwriting instincts. [10 Mar 2006, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    For the first time, Oberst sounds as if he's trying to conform his lyrics to his tunes, not the other way around. [4 Feb 2005, p.130]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Malibu defies categorization, which is a testament to Paak’s versatility and his willingness to take detours, not all of which work (the well-meaning but dopey celebration of boobs “Silicon Valley” is exhibit A). But even when his muse leads him astray, it’s easy to see why Dre got in on the Anderson .Paak business early and often.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    This cagey old pro makes room for stray nonsense phrases like "bop-bop-a-whoa" as well; spirited spirituality is his goal these days.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Third is indeed a less immediately accessible effort than Portishead's more groove-oriented earlier work, but it's no less gorgeous.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The results are astonishing. [26 July 2002, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Girls' melding of new wave and indie pop literally sounds timeless... [3/9/2001, p.82]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Late Registration is more cumbersome and burdened than its predecessor--a little less cohesive, a lot less fun--but it rarely fails to engross at nearly every step. [2 Sep 2005, p.77]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Damn if an already nearly perfect album doesn't, with these bonus tracks, gets a little better itself. [18 Jul 2008, p.64]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The payoff is the boldest work yet from a band famous for subtlety--the sound of the xx hitting the caps-lock key.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    On Helplessness Blues, their second disc of intimate, obsessively crafted folk, the bearded Seattleites take a giant step forward in their quest to turn the clock backward.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's heavy and hooky. [20 May 2005, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's their trademark boisterous hyper-melodies... that will have you involuntarily humming their praises for weeks (months!) to come. [26 Aug 2005, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Moon's two cohesive CDs prove as emotionally powerful as anything in his catalog. [1 Jun 2007, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Just the sort of punky reggae party he was born to throw. [24 Oct 2003, p.106]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    A modest, charming relic...
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    While Newsom remains the most intricate lyricist currently working ?outside of rap, her melodies have become cleaner, her ?arrangements less mannered, and her singing more ?straightforwardly heartfelt.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    They remain one of rock's most pleasurable hand-me-down discoveries. [29 Apr 2005, p.148]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    If the second half brings diminishing returns, it's still more than worth the trip.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Somehow the band makes it work, though, pulling all those disparate sounds together in a unified style that's all the more glorious for its strangeness.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    There's no denying this is the sound of a band at its onstage peak. [18 Nov 2005, p.135]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They're profane, bursting with rage and lust, and they deliver more laughs than anyone since Richard Pryor.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Alt-rock blues darker and scarier than Jon Spencer or even Jack White ever imagined. [24 Dec 2004, p.66]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A vertiginous rainbow swirl that crams so many ideas into so many tight spaces that each track is like a perfectly rendered Joseph Cornell box.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    They embellish what they long ago mastered: making shaggy, dreamy, cuddly, explosive indie rock. [15 Sep 2006, p.72]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A rich exploration of Appalachian roots. [25 Nov 2011, p.71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Jasper beats her '90s efforts.... Yet any personality dissipates amid the average tunes. [23 Sep 2005, p.91]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    With thrash-and-burn riffs, shout-along rants, E Street Band-style blue-collar blues, and tin-can acoustics, these Jersey boys' debut album The Airing of Grievances burns all the way down from its big mouth to its black liver.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Everett finally delivers the absolute stone masterpiece fans have always known lurked inside his dour heart. [29 Apr 2005, p.147]
    • Entertainment Weekly