Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 3,368 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 18% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Icky Mettle [Deluxe Edition]
Lowest review score: 0 Playing With Fire
Score distribution:
3368 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    White's best songs combine his songwriting chops with his boundless charisma, and Lazaretto has both in spades--the swaggeringly funky ''Three Women'' and the strutting title track are instant classics. But so far, his solo work lacks the bracing agitation that fueled past projects.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Dreamy, glitchy art pop. [2 Mar 2012, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    For the first time, she has managed to capture her inimitable stage presence on record. With this set of scrappy, rapturous barn jams, she has captured lightning in a bottle (or, more accurately, thunder in a digital file).
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nothing here explains the reported $4.5 million budget. [28 June 2002, p.142]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With their repetitive guitar riffs echoing against electronics, DIV aren't as flashy as fellow crossover masters the Chemical Brothers, but their appeal doesn't fade as quickly, either.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    John Vanderslice's sixth full-length, Emerald City, doesn't disappoint.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It should be thrillingly anarchic; instead, it just meanders.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Oneida still imprint each song with their own warped sensibility. [14 Jul 2006, p.81]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Lovely, intimately spare songs. [5 Apr 2013, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    World is like stumbling into a jazz café at closing time. [22 Sep 2006, p.94]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This is an impressive representation of the MMJ live experience. [29 Sep 2006, p.81]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Scarface acts his age on more thoughtful cuts like 'Who Do You Believe In,' which offers a somber take on the many forces that claim innocent inner-city lives, from gang rivalries to the war in Iraq.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Kicking off the Philadelphia hip-hop band's 10th CD is a snippet from a 1994 conference call with then label Geffen, in which rapper Black Thought goes apoplectic. This is the first of many bad vibes on Rising Down, which turns the downcast mood of 2006's haunting "Game Theory" outward at the world at large, with gripes about drug laws, school shootings, conflict diamonds, and--that most alarming bellwether of our times--BET programming.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    For all its pretenses of being giddy and spontaneous, though, Confessions is rarely either.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    He finally has the sumptuous, sweeping arrangements to go along with his ruminative road stories and stream-of-consciousness, Dylanesque folk. [14 Apr 2006, p.86]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As always, it's historically rooted music fired by present-tense passion. [20 Feb 2004, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    [Banks] brings a surprisingly uplifting tunefulness to the band's spiky rhythms and swelling drones. [1 Oct 2004, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Is there a more wrenching soul singer alive than Bettye LaVette? If so, keep it to yourself, because I'm too wrung out from The Scene of the Crime's intensity to take anything more emotionally potent.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Each trippy disc holds up remarkably well, though we wouldn't recommend listening to all three while operating machinery. [23 Nov 2012, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    OST
    Bridges and his onscreen protégé, Colin Farrell, give admirable heft (yes, they're really singing) to originals penned by Burnett and a crew of veteran sidemen.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The strong '80s nostalgia here could wear thin for some, but Solange's singular charms stretch far. [7 Dec 2012, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Built to Spill make music with a weird naive excitement that recalls R.E.M. at their fresh-out-of-Athens finest.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Your gratitude for his economical writing may overcome your wonderment over why something so modest took so long.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Though too long at 50 minutes, Beyond is an often thrilling reminder of this essential band's heyday.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Noisy but built on articulate songwriting, Near radiates a sincerity often missing from bands this brash. At a time of doubt and fear, it’s screamingly optimistic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Noble Beast veers off into a cheerily nonspecific world of jangly guitars and meandering melodies that evoke everyone from Okkervil River to Radiohead without ever making an impact of their own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Son
    Even for Anglos, the spellbinding Son needs no translation. [26 May 2006, p.106]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With repeated listenings, the sluggish ditties transform into a beautiful, mournful hymn of love won and lost.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A startlingly, shockingly wonderful piece of pop art. [19 Mar 2004, p.64]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Trucks' bluesy playing is excellent throughout, though he knows when to cede space to vocalist Mike Mattison or guest Doyle Bramhall II.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The Texas indie outfit marries potent frontier imagery with psych-country shuffles. [20 May 2011, p.72]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    As hopelessly antiquated as it may sound in the year 2000, it's as if they decided it was time to write and record an album of very good, extremely substantial traditional rock songs with an underlying inspirational bent.... the new work focuses on songs, not sonic gimmicks, and the difference is palpable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Luckily, the melodic wall of noise crashes through the more heavy-handed moments. [2 Nov 2012, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    On My Dinosaur Life, the Minneapolis quintet's winning fourth album (ably produced by blink-182's Mark Hoppus), frontguy Justin Pierre lets his geek flag fly, likening a breakup to the destruction of Superman's home world and puzzling over ephemera ranging from acid rain to Busta Rhymes, all backed by soaring choruses guaranteed to fossilize themselves into your brain.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The singer's greatest strength remains the glistening natural resource flowing from her throat.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Some of that soul [heard on previous singles "Tomorrow" and "Voices"] survives on his fourth album, but too often he falls into the "bro country" trap currently plaguing the genre. [20/27 Sep 2013, p.152]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Hold Time does, in fact, feel timeless, a musical wanderer's dusty, train-hopping tour through folk, blues, and country.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This gem leaves you wanting more. [21 Apr 2006, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Cave's songs once conjured eternity. Now they just feel like one. [13 Apr 2001, p.76]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    His latest returns a sense of urgency to a musical revolution-turned-boutique genre. The vibe's faster and gnarlier... [10/27/2000, p.120]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Waits tends to inspire love-it-or-hate-it reactions; those who don't dig him will probably be mystefied by the over-the-top cheers captured here. [27 Nov 2009, p.71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It's exciting to hear the minimalist U.K. trio approach their new-crush odes with such austerity in Coexist.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It's that very rare thing: a totally fresh--and utterly engaging--sound. [Listen 2 This supplement, Mar 2004, p.12]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Much of Clancy's Tavern--named after a bar Keith's grandmother once ran--strikes a quieter, more intimate note.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Gibbard finds the near-perfect pop record that's eluded his main group. [Listen 2 This supplement, Mar 2003, p.12]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Practically every song is a near-perfect amalgam of straight-up melodies and pogoing beats. [5 Nov 2004, p.80]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Once again, English speakers need not understand a lick of Swedish to enjoy the music's universally mind-expanding effects.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's a quietly compelling follow-up to their more adventurous 2009 debut. [23 Sep 2011, p.79]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Underscored by high-octane tunes, Post Pop Depression runs the gamut from quiet introspection to brash rebellion--and stands tall as some of Pop’s most essential work in years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    On his third disc in as many years, the 28-year-old Southerner with the Michael Jackson falsetto not only wears his heart on his sleeve, he lets it bleed down his (no doubt high-thread-count) cuff.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Supplement[s] his prior folky ways with a rash of surprising styles. [16 Sep 2005, p.85]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The album grows same-y, but tracks like the surfing-as-life-metaphor anthem 'Amongst the Waves' do indeed make something old feel, if not new, good again.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Hip Hop Is Dead is a lot like Nas himself: impossible not to admire, but hard to love.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    For every pump-your-fist gem like 'Hearts of Fire,' there's a lifeless cut like the clanky 'Silver Thoughts.' [25 Apr/2 May 2008, p.117]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Summer could use more hooks, but who else is writing about Owl's Head park? [22 Jul 2011, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Morphs subtly between hip-hop abstraction and unalloyed free-improv exploration. [Listen 2 This supplement, Aug 2002, p.23]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Mary Star of the Sea may be the least ambitious album Corgan's ever made -- and yet his most satisfying since the Pumpkins' heyday.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Only the somewhat sterile production detracts from a fine reunion. [15 Aug 2003, p.76]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The perfect antidote to a season of false cheer and frozen toes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With perky melodies and singsong choruses, angst has rarely sounded so precious.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Somewhere along the way, the moody micro-bleeps and spacey strums have become a wee bit monotonous and predictable. [21 Oct 2005, p.77]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The pristine, synth-heavy result certainly sounds worried over, sometimes to its detriment. [28 Jul 2006, p.67]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    He's more than capable of drifting smoothly between bluesy soul, juke-joint R&B, and drinking-song folk on his hearty debut. [6 Oct 2014, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Backed by a galvanizing ensemble of musicians that would make the Funk Brothers proud, Saadiq belts out effervescent love songs with infectious vigor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Gleeful sprees through reggae, electro, drum lines and zydeco, while MCs Jessibel, Belinda, and Cat giggle, tease and seduce. [13 May 2005, p.88]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Middle Cyclone is the kind of record it's nearly impossible to hate: a pleasantly swirling strum and twang of guitars, gentle percussion, and That Voice.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    There are none of the folk-alt-rock karaoke selections of previous American discs on American VI: Ain't No Grave, just 10 wholly appropriate picks that speak to the gravity of ?Johnny Cash's situation and his joy?in both life and death.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Blessed, the roots-music veteran's latest feels a little sleepy compared with 2008's hard-rocking Little Honey.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Psychedelic Pill allows pretty haunted melodies like "She's Always Dancing" to seep into the gaps between the jagged solos. [2 Nov 2012, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the year's most consistently pleasurable debuts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Their lyrics... roil with the randiness and violence of Delta classics. [22/29 Aug 2003, p.132]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    Feels like Teenage Fanclub's winter CD, owing a debt more to the mopey introspection and sparse arrangements of Nick Drake. [17 June 2005, p.83]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This lush, un-hurried album reveals a surer character, rebuking other rappers who talk smack "just to get a reaction" and even relatives diminished by easy money and proximity to fame.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A downtrodden and droopy-eyed batch of heartsick tales. [combined review of both discs; 27 Feb 2004, p.99]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Cut Chemist makes frisky, gleeful funk that touches on Brazilian samba, surf rock, and even polka, without losing the beat. [21 Jul 2006, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    There's a subtle beauty amid the madness. [24 Mar 2006, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    [He] peppers his dour dedications with a deadpan, Morrissey-esque wit. [9 Dec 2005, p.89]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Show Your Bones picks up where "Maps" left off, with the trio finding a middle ground between self-conscious primitivism and refined pop. [31 Mar 2006, p.60]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A worthy sequel to last year's similarly Americana-leaning Secret, Profane & Sugarcane. [Nov. 5, 2010, p. 71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Prisoner doesn’t differ enough from its recent predecessors to stand out as a singular mid-career achievement for the ever-prolific songwriter, but it’s one of Adams’ most fully-realized, sturdy collections to date, and quite possibly his finest record of the past decade.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Combining Motown falsettos and the best of late-'60s groove rock with spacey loops and hipster-art-collective ?sing-alongs, they deliver a sound that's friendly and familiar without being derivative; it's a sort of retrofitted make-out van on a club crawl.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    The heightened production values... sacrifice a bit of Benson's scrappy charm, but they also yield several sparkling should-be hits. [25 Mar 2005, p.71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The debut from Britain's much-fussed-over Florence + the Machine finally hits the States, and Lungs proves they're worth the adoration.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The quintet's refined funk tweaks the genre-busting dance rock of classic Prince and New Order with a modern, synth-happy sheen. [16 Jun 2006, p.77]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Occasionally, all that lamenting gets nap-inducing. Luckily, Hansard saves some rage for 'Feeling the Pull,' which suggests the best love songs come from those who don't believe in them anymore.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    A charmingly ramshackle disc of giddy garage-pop nuggets. [25 Mar 2011, p.79]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It's true that Timbaland's signature style... doesn't seem quite as amazing as it did five years ago. Still, it gets the job done. [28 Nov 2003, p.124]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    A mix of songs and themes balancing obsessive craft with flippant style. [3 May 2002, p.89]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    The Stills succeed at distilling their influences into an inviting update. [24 Oct 2003, p.105]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Spews enough speed, hooks, and sick puns to sate the most ADD-afflicted appetite for distraction. [20 Jun 2003, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    13
    Orbit's masterfully sludgy production adds a layer of grime to even the poppiest songs, and his cut-and-paste edits and swooshing studio flourishes create a sense of dizzy late-night anguish throughout.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Another multifaceted gem.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    City Sun Eater in the River of Light is another accomplished album that’s just strong enough to differentiate itself from the pack.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Midlake excel at lush, harmony-laden ballads like "Bandits" and the heart-tugging goodbye song "You Never Arrived." [4 Aug 2006, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    At times, the doctor and his new band sound oddly akin to Steely Dan in a mellow mood, with lyrics only a tad less literary than that group's.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    However precious her poetry can be, Carlton always pins it to melodies that morph and expand evocatively.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Ross' ear for lush, expansive beats has become keener and his industry Rolodex deeper, 
allowing him to make every track but the intro feel like an epic, costarring major talents like Jay-Z, Kanye West, Erykah Badu, and Drake.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Shakira's finest work to date. [17 June 2005, p.79]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Hip-hop's own Cheech and Chong boast chemistry that's as powerful as ever on Blackout! 2, this belated follow-up.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This album is not just the band's most adventurous but also its best.