Q Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 6,052 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 39% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 59% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Led Zeppelin IV [Remastered]
Lowest review score: 0 Gemstones
Score distribution:
6,052 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Flabbergasting... a genuine revolution in the head. [Dec 2006, p.133]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An extraordinary record. [Mar 2007, p.115]
    • Q Magazine
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Not only do the rhythms here sound tighter and more intensely focused, Murphy's presence as a songwriter and frontman is a revelation. [Apr 2007, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ()
    A masterpiece of bombed orchestral elegance, at once expansive and intense. [Dec 2002, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is witty English guitar rock of the highest calibre. [Nov 2002, p.114]
    • Q Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Music Kills Me occasionally drifts into the overly familiar world of laid-back jazz grooves, Latino rhythms and flutes, but there's enough elsewhere to intrigue. [Apr 2002, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cocker's treasurable wit and the band's seventh album have taken a corporation bus ride out for strange, poetic interludes among the trees and the undergrowth.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Little Sparrow mixes its trad tendencies with tunes, lovely instruments, and best of all, Parton's personality.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A slow-burning but deeply impressive debut. [Sep 2002, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An oddity for sure, but much too good to be restricted to specialist alt-rock record retailers. [July 2002, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Remedy follows a growing list of albums born of an infectious energy and bubbling belief that, dance-wise these days, almost anything goes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pop doesn't get much more gloriously trashy than this. [Apr 2003, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most intimate record of the year, and one of the warmest. [Oct 2003, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Combining the brittle emotion of Bob Mould with Dave Grohl's understanding of rock dynamics, My Vitriol are robust enough for the moshpit while also providing the perfect soundtrack for those dark nights when the only company you need is a wine bottle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In its own fragile way, a delight. [Mar 2003, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A second album full of ambition and epic arrangements so unexpected it knocks you sideways. [May 2004, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Change Is Coming is piled high with Beastie trademarks.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Droll, baffling and brilliant in equal measure. [Mar 2002, p.128]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    By far their most effective release.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Once you've let it grow on you, Sea Change is largely so lovely that you'll forgive him. [Oct 2002, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Shine is a work of subtlety and hushed intimacy that, at times, barely seems to exist at all. [May 2003, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    18
    A more coherent album [than Play], it enchances rather than advances his previous approach, proving superior to its predecessor because its music is more sensitive, its emotions more personal, and what's on offer is a closer, more inviting experience. [May 2002, p.105]
    • Q Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So is it White Ladder II? In a word, "yes." [Nov 2002, p.94]
    • Q Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's great, with well-judged strings and horns giving full rein to some marvellously acute lyrics.... A glorious return. [Oct 2002, p.117]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs are perfectly pitched, and even the less obviously suited numbers are approached with interpretive genius. [Sep 2002, p.101]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hard, reverb-heavy, yet fluent guitar arabesques topped by husky, yearning, sorely troubled vocals. [Nov 2000, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It works... stretching rap into weird new shapes. [Feb 2003, p.97]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Everyone will say this sounds like Beck, but at the last count Beck would be lucky to sound like Eels.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lilac6 is as effortlessly subtle and debonair as 1999's reformation album.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite a late lapse into mediocrity, the good here far outshines the bland. [Feb 2003, p.96]
    • Q Magazine
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Revitalises originals such as Hejira and For The Roses while staying faithful to them. [Jan 2003, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His best since 1995s Is The Actor Happy? [May 2003, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A marvellous, surprising comeback from a forgotten talent. [Mar 2003, p.103]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Poignant and sincere, this is a Bill Callahan we could do with more of. [Jun 2003, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its charms are bound up with the subtle pleasures of listening to these songs anew and re-understanding their make-up. [#184, p.127]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Cuttin' Heads hardly stretches him, Mellencamp dresses up his old tricks beautifully. [Mar 2002, p.125]
    • Q Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is their most rewarding yet, built to enjoy in one 38-minute session, languid, melancholy tunes growing out of barely audible static pulses, incoherently Vocodered whispers or preposterously exciting cymbal splashes, carried on by soft pianos, vulgarity-free brass and strings into Bitch Magnet-meets-Samuel Barber electric cataclysms.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are vintage sounding yet wholly fresh. [Feb 2003, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A rhythmic assurance helps Muggs navigate the flabby portentousness that has hampered Massive Attack of late. [Apr 2003, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The settings are spacious, the rhythms stately and Stuart Staples croons woozily about how it's all gone horribly wrong.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It really is hard to distinguish between the eight tracks here, but when a theme's this good, the variants are never going to be a problem. [Mar 2003, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Quietly thrilling. [Feb 2002, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Its kitsch-free excellence confirms Hawley as a balladeer of the very highest order. [Mar 2003, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They even give Madonna's I Deserve It a new level of dignity. [Jan 2004, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At its best, this is strangely charming, chiming pop music with a twist. At other times, the bare-boned production hampers the inventiveness, rendering a track such as Y Teimlad (The Feeling) a workmanlike Velvet Underground retread rather than the thing of symphonic beauty it briefly threatens to be.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The results are just wonderful. [Sep 2003, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like Moon Safari-era Air, unleashes shimmering, cinematic musical waves that gently wash over you but eventually suck you in entirely. [Nov 2002, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Scarecrow's sense of defeat actually makes it a better record. [Jan 2002, p.96]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Up
    Gabriel is mesmerising, his plaintive rasp never more gorgeous. [Oct 2002, p.107]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A couple of the songs are grunge by rote, but the art-rock sensibility gleaned from Weiland's old David Bowie albums is evident in the whispered Hell It's Late. [Oct 2001, p.130]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An often-inspired collection of eccentric pop songs and unexpected proggy workouts. [July 2002, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Out there, but compelling all the same. [#184, p.137]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Comeliness and brutal candour in equal measure. [Jun 2003, p.92]
    • Q Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Juke joint heaven. [May 2003, p.106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heavy-duty electronics doing repeatedly bloody battle with grimy strings... An intense but worthwhile experience. [Nov 2000, p.102]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Assured and dignified. [May 2002, p.119]
    • Q Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Wicked Grin is a bona fide revelation.... A rambunctious joy from beginning to end.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is music that exerts as much effortless cool as young pups The Strokes. [Oct 2001, p.118]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Another triumph, brimming with soulful, languid grooves, deft samples and well-chosen guest singers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Slick samples and buoyant melodies are in, dissonant atmospherics pretty much out. [Feb 2002, p.111]
    • Q Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album of rich, subtle melodies, championship-level guitar playing and lyrical depth. [Sep 2002, p.115]
    • Q Magazine
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's the tender slow rollers that really clinch this supreme collection. [#180, p.97]
    • Q Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The W is largely a return to murky idiosyncratic form after 1997's filler-bloated Wu-Tang Forever. Weighing in at a svelte 60 minutes, it plays to the group?s main strengths: brutal hooks and scary ambience.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    All in all, as resonant and dignified a covers album as you'll ever hear.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a quietly adventurous coming of age, as languorous and fuzzy around the edges as a summer afternoon.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Highly charged without being mawkish. [July 2002, p.115]
    • Q Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As radio-friendly as Radiohead are not. [Sep 2001, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Seal The Deal opens with a rollicking piano intro that's longer than the rest of the song, guitars are abandoned in favour of exhilarating keyboard riffs, and the background use of birdsong and bagpipes is commonplace in Quasi's world. And it's a better place for it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They've crucially learned that musical light and shade need not only be flaring explosions, but melodic sunrises too. [Jul 2003, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They retained their best ideas for themselves though, since their debut album is striking escape from mere genre. [Review of UK version]
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A haunting, left-field album of some class. [Jun 2003, p.96]
    • Q Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though rockier in parts than any of his previous work, this 12-track set houses some of Johnson's most impressive songwriting to date.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Why didn't they just call it Supernatural II and have done with it? [Dec 2002, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's full of clever rhymes and couplets, overflowing with wit and evocative charm, all set to the kind of arrangements that Harry Nilsson always dreamed of. [Aug 2001, p.142]
    • Q Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A brooding collection. [May 2004, p.108]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    i
    A proper treat for aficionados of the laugh-out-loud lyric. [May 2004, p.106]
    • Q Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's '80s synth-pop in spirit rather than form, miles away from the make-up clad silliness of electroclash and much more interested in muching about with present day technology than simply recreating the past. [Jun 2004, p.98]
    • Q Magazine
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stepping outside of their natural environment ensured their longevity in the '90s, stepping back in seems to have given them a fresh boost. For all Zooropa and Pop's pushing of the envelope, limiting themselves to rock's core ingredients has given the band a new challenge. Certainly, not since The Joshua Tree have U2 sounded so like U2 but, with songs of this startling calibre, right now being U2 is no bad thing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her aching sincerity’s another major plus; that she can get away with Caged Bird’s Stevie Wonder-isms and Fallin’s near plagiarism of James Brown’s It’s A Man’s World speaks volumes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For sheer bravado and imagination it's something that few bands will top this year. [Oct 2003, p.109]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Matches Slipknot for manic intensity while employing a freeform approach to songcraft which invites comparison to the lunatic-fringe rock of the late '60s. [Sep 2001, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Singer Pat Monahan has a Michael Stipe-esque voice: part whine part sneer, but with an added dollop of believeable pathos. On this second album, his four colleagues concoct intriguing backdrops... [#180, p.112]
    • Q Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ash have turned in a bullish and cocksure fifth studio album to delight the faithful. [Jun 2004, p.95]
    • Q Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His best work in many a long year. [Jun 2004, p.105]
    • Q Magazine
    • 95 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dre and Big Boi (alias Andre Benjamin and Antwan Patton) fill their technicolour vision with the ghosts of Sly Stone, James Brown and, most notably, Funkadelic-era George Clinton. Factor in some distinctly unorthodox production and you've rap at its risk-taking best...
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is maverick electronica without the headaches. [Jul 2003, p.103]
    • Q Magazine
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She avoids excessive sugariness via edgy, sensual lyrics and Timbaland's superlative production. [June 2002, p.123]
    • Q Magazine
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As a daring experiment which flies in the face of the derivative tendencies evident in the modern music industry, it succeeds. [Dec 2004, p.140]
    • Q Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For his eighth album, he has returned to renowned metal producer Ed Stasium, who delivers both high-impact guitar and sufficient clarity for enjoyment of Heat's droll way with words. [Apr 2002, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Curiously compelling for something so minimal, it's like nothing else around. [Jul 2003, p.110]
    • Q Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even more meandering than its celebrated, if somewhat cold, predecessor. It's also more confident, more coherent, yielding an all-enveloping warmth that's entirely resistant to any iPod shuffle function. [Jul 2004, p.119]
    • Q Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the rollercoaster ride, there are intense moments of pop wonder and cartoon hilarity. [Sep 2004, p.120]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's when Bubba stays with his Southern roots... that he really shines. [Oct 2003, p.100]
    • Q Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Back in the real world, fans of the disconnected Callahan know what to expect. They're a loyal breed who puzzle over his dryly funny lyrics and file the CDs next to Mark Eitzel and Nick Cave... His best yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A great leap forward. [Oct 2003, p.113]
    • Q Magazine
    • 93 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is little short of a treat: a rambunctious dance through the more sepia-tinted corners of US musical history. [Oct 2001, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It might be wearing, were it not for the fact that his voice... is a thing of considerable power. [Aug 2005, p.122]
    • Q Magazine
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mixes melancholy and might to a rare degree. [Sep 2002, p.104]
    • Q Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Together We're Heavy's transcendent qualities grow as it flows onward, and the sheer musical ambition of the Spree's pet sound finally, really defies cynicism. [Aug 2004, p.116]
    • Q Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sigur Ros's second album proper features this astonishing opener ["Svefn-G-Englar"] and 10 others which, while surprisingly diverse, each reflects their penchant for apocalyptic serenity, overdriven guitars and teenage singer Jonsi's Birgisson unique Hopelandish language.