Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 3,392 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 To Pimp A Butterfly
Lowest review score: 0 They Were Wrong, So We Drowned
Score distribution:
3,392 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Warm and inviting, his latest opus occasions swan dives into future soul, funky dubstep ("Dance of the Pseudo Nymph"), Theo Parrish–styled house ("Do the Astral Plane"), and astonishingly, Sun Ra jazz ("Arkestry").
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There's definitely something welcoming about Koi No Yokan's comparative purity, in the band's understanding of how little they need.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    [A] beautiful if vague fourth studio album.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    LP1
    In its menacing incandescence, LP1 sounds like nothing else in the world right now.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Barring "Blade Runner," the best pop art by a former adman. [June 2008, p.119]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Stone Rollin's rhythm-and-blues revival can't obscure Saadiq's songwriting talents.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    They add enough kinks to the old herky-jerk formulae to make their half-hour in the sun blaze by like nobody's business. [Dec 2004, p.124]
    • Spin
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He's still way too fond of show-tune orchestration, and then there's the tossed-off corny stuff, but the orneriness of Newman's now-64-year-old wit makes George Carlin seem like Dane Cook. [Sep 2008, p.120]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sam Amidon works similarly quirky alchemy here [as Moby did a decade ago], reinventing public-domain songs (plus one modern-day ringer) as rustic mood music for watching distant super-novas explode.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though crunching at their heaviest, the band still shines brightest when they edge toward indie-rock approachability.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    High drama of the blunt, uncliched sort unheard since the Afghan Whigs' '90s heyday. [Jun 2007, p.94]
    • Spin
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Fantasy Empire equally splits its time between the physical and metaphysical. It belongs as much in a musty basement as it does in an art gallery.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the signs of sonic evolution, All Hands is mostly cut from the same cloth as its predecessors, with the record's heat generated from the braiding of lead singer Tucker's histrionic vocals and Brownstein's deadpan backup and everywhere-at-once guitar.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    It's not gallows humor, just the most natural thing in the world. [Oct 2003, p.113]
    • Spin
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    It's a testament to both Cee-Lo's vision and the producers' artistic sympathy that the collaborations maintain a coherent, vintage R&B vibe. [Mar 2004, p.91]
    • Spin
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    His new mixtape's best moments gain their power from such good-idea/bad-idea indulgences and batty risk-taking.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's one 
of the most overly complicated hard-rock records 
of the past ten years. It's also one of the best.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If Slave Ambient represented a breakthrough, this one is an out-and-out star-maker that should rank among the year's best albums.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They've never sounded more in tune with the materiality of sound or the sonorousness of the physical world.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The first single's called 'Pretty Wings,' but the whole thing flies.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The 78-minute Spiral Shadow supersizes everything, from song lengths to layers of deep-focus space-rock effects, but the sprawling songs are still built around riffs as sweaty as a south Georgia summer.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While Jonathan Meiburg’s uneasy high quaver has always generated the kind of simmering intensity that made Jeff Buckley so gripping and unnerving, canny tonal shifts give his introspective songs a bristling, heightened urgency.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They've also inflected the mix with OutKast's quick complexity; and, like 'Kast, the Coup have progressed from story rapping to more mercurial rhymes. [Oct 2001, p.125]
    • Spin
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The overall dark, diaphanous sound here almost oversells the title, but it's impossible not to get lost in 
the drift.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    [Fox Confessor] shows that for all her versatility, she has a singular vision when it comes to her own music. And Lordy, it is dark. [Mar 2006, p.92]
    • Spin
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    An often-great set of songs about loneliness. [Feb 2005, p.85]
    • Spin
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As punk's dumbing down has proven, anyone can make abrasive music, but few can do something new and compelling with apocalyptic heaviness. That Portishead manage to do both 14 years into their recorded career is an unexpected triumph over the darkest clouds that have shaped their art and soul. [May 2008, p.93]
    • Spin
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    As ornate and bloated as West's ego. [Sep 2005, p.99]
    • Spin
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Although he's stretching traditional, time-tested folk templates culled from around the world and back again, Tyler's vision is both distinctly American and deeply modern.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The Hold Steady are mellowing, and it doesn't really suit them.