I Can Spin a Rainbow Image
Metascore
60

Mixed or average reviews - based on 9 Critic Reviews What's this?

User Score
6.4

Generally favorable reviews- based on 9 Ratings

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  • Artist(s): Edward Ka-Spel
  • Summary: This is the full-length debut collaboration between Dresden Dolls' Amanda Palmer and The Legendary Pink Dots' Edward Ka-Spel.
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Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 3 out of 9
  2. Negative: 0 out of 9
  1. May 9, 2017
    90
    Each song tells its own story so intensely and so completely, like 11 musical horror novellas, that listening to any of them individually produces an experience more like that of listening to a shortish, intense, masterpiece-like album, especially as the songs often have a few different musical sections and ideas.
  2. Q Magazine
    May 9, 2017
    80
    The pair mesh with ease. [Jul 2017, p.112]
  3. May 4, 2017
    70
    I Can Spin a Rainbow finds her bouncing ideas off of the Legendary Pink Dots’ Edward Ka-Spel, whose aggressively experimental approach to what a song can entail is so specific and unyielding that the album forces her into new modes.
  4. May 4, 2017
    60
    It’s a bold, considered whole; it's rich in theatrical texture and ambient psychedelia, but it’s not an easy listen. Often deliberately discordant, it won’t be to everyone’s tastes, certainly not to fans of Palmer’s poppier work.
  5. Mojo
    May 5, 2017
    60
    Gloomy, seductive avant folk-blues. [Jun 2017, p.95]
  6. Jun 29, 2017
    50
    At best, I Can Spin a Rainbow feels like the work of two talented artists savoring a long weekend of boundless creativity together, but from an outsider's perspective, the results are a bit too impenetrable to contextualize without having been in the room to witness its genesis.
  7. May 9, 2017
    40
    The album is convincing as a collaboration between friends, the obvious downside being that it also sounds like an inside joke, an indulgence on a whim that few others share or can access. The record is a slow parade of gothic vaudeville, like a less-convincing Emilie Autumn album without the thrill of the accompanying subculture.

See all 9 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 0 out of 3
  2. Negative: 2 out of 3
  1. Oct 18, 2017
    6
    This unapologetically avant-garde collaboration between two generations of already unconventional musical artists seems to revel in its ownThis unapologetically avant-garde collaboration between two generations of already unconventional musical artists seems to revel in its own inaccessibility. Fans of the experimental Edward Ka-Spel will definitely be more at home here than Amanda Palmer's crowd. That being said, both camps should give it at least one spin, though I doubt it will ever be either's favorite work. Expand
  2. May 10, 2017
    1
    Unfortunately I don't have many good things to say about the album. I'm a big fan of Amanda Palmer and like most of the things she has done,Unfortunately I don't have many good things to say about the album. I'm a big fan of Amanda Palmer and like most of the things she has done, but none of the songs on this album sat well with me at all. Either they were actively annoying songs or very boring. Expand
  3. May 8, 2017
    1
    I have always loved Amanda Palmer's music and art. Until now. For me, this album is dull, boring and a complete miss. We have been waiting forI have always loved Amanda Palmer's music and art. Until now. For me, this album is dull, boring and a complete miss. We have been waiting for a new album since her ceiling smashing record with the Grand Theft Orchestra. We will have to keep waiting. Cause this wasn't it. Expand