Alternative Press' Scores

  • Music
For 3,071 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Audience's Listening
Lowest review score: 0 Results May Vary
Score distribution:
3071 music reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Overall, the songs are well-written and daring. Some tracks are more successful than others (”Where Did It Go?” and “Vultures” are standouts), but it is an altogether engaging listen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On their eighth album, the breadth of Godflesh’s influences are wider than ever, and their capacity for psychological excavation runs deeper.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Transcending genre, Interiors is Quicksand in 2017, a time where no one is quite sure if we’ve moved backward.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The band still maintain their status as leaders. Frontman Jacob Bannon is physically incapable of phoning in his performances, and always ready to bring the fear. Kurt Ballou’s guitar work is a joy to experience, whether he's carpal tunneling through downstrokes, picking out lyrical phrases to frame Bannon's ominous moments (“Thousands Of Miles Between Us”) or bringing the straight-up noise like a hateful glass-bomb explosion ("Under Duress").
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Beyond the necessity, Birdie is a record that teeters an indie/emo line with ease and a sense of hybridity. Press “play” for a sense of melancholic calm.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The 79-minute runtime will undoubtedly turn some casual listeners off, but those patient enough to stick it out until the end are in for the Used’s most soul-wrenching, creatively daring effort to date.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    There’s an elegance to her music that wasn’t there before--a sudden bright piano riff over deep guitar; a harrowing, shouted acapella--that feels like a coming of age.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a collective work, Pacific Daydream is ultimately a step below the resurgent greatness of the White Album, but it still soundly ranks in the upper tier of Weezer’s new-millennium output. It’s peppered with some of the band’s best songs in recent memory.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Blood Of Gods strips away unnecessary studio wizardry and presents GWAR in its rawest sonic state, opting for a rough-and-tumble attitude. Nearly every beat and riff on the record screams for listeners to pay attention.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An impressive and diverse follow-up to an already-impressive debut.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It would have been incredibly easy for them to rest on their laurels and placate the faithful. Instead, they took a huge creative risk, pushing the idea of what--and who--they are as a band while still retaining their identity. And damn, does it sound good.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If you fancy darkness, BDM have upgraded their harrowing sound to embody the concept completely. Tracks like “Matriarch” will remind you what got you into melodic death metal in the first place, while “Jars” and “As Good As Dead” put the band’s diverse influences on display.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sonically, there’s something incredibly otherworldy and fantastical rooted in Phantom Anthem, making the album translate like an epic poem rather than a collection of songs, both enticing for its cohesion and at times tedious in its redundancy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are minor lulls here, but enough highs to majorly please.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Manson is keeping things exciting and crucial the only way rock’s long-running antihero can. Pro Tip: Listen on headphones, where his unadorned, chilling stalker-esque asides will make your bladder flex.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Gossip succeeds in delivering an inspirational array of tracks that, as a whole, are a natural progression (and successful foray) into the mainstream.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This Detroit outfit have restrained their post-punk intentions somewhat, playing with more textured compositions rather than blunt assault of their earlier material. This proves to be the perfect swirling yet steady backdrop for frontman Joe Casey to spin his cheap beer-fueled freeform yarns of lost souls and tortured romantics. [Oct 2017, p.83]
    • Alternative Press
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Circa just sound oddly restrained, in a way, and the most enthralling moments don’t feel quite as emotionally resonant or grabbing as the band’s been so capable of in the past, especially with a slower pace down the stretch. That said, an average Circa Survive album is still a cut above most anything out there, and their subtle yet ever-continuing evolution remains a compelling thing. [Oct 2017, p.81]
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As expected, frontman/programmer Rou Reynolds remains urgent and vulnerable. [Oct 2017, p.81]
    • Alternative Press
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On their fierce third album, METZ have ratcheted their cacophony up high enough and still have it be considered rock music. [Oct 2017, p.81]
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bigger production values and more group playing than her previous piano/vocal introspection. Haines delivers urgency and depth without having to shear off her throat lining, and can convey vulnerability and uncertainty with a brave face. [Oct 2017, p.81]
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Their music is tighter, sharper and aiming for the jugular in its first shot. In the simplest terms, the band crafted a record that fills the bigger venues they are sure to be playing now and in the future.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The quartet have delivered some of the most raw and willfully demented rock music to be vomited up in 2017, and Patton's inimitable contributions ensure that the crazy meter remains permanently in the red. [Aug 2017, p.82]
    • Alternative Press
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Manchester Orchestra are no strangers to reinvention, but this is a bold step. It’s a grower of a sound: folky yet enormous, like Fleet Foxes at their most widescreen, and with no immediate hooks (“The Gold” is close, though). When they do emerge, they’re not easy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ultimately, The Knife is proof he [John Feldmann] still has plenty left in his own songwriting tank. [Aug 2017, p.82]
    • Alternative Press
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's proof that there's plenty of life left in its creators. [Aug 2017, p.83]
    • Alternative Press
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Here, retaking the signature spell that Hellion and crew first conjured in the ’90s Cleveland scene, the band’s haunted hardcore gets a fresh coat of paint for the next stage of darkness. If you’re ready to enter the nightmare, this will get you howling.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Bloom feels less like the work of a persona than an authentic attempt at sorting out a sometimes messy life--far from perfect, yet perfectly compelling.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In spite of the somewhat dour tone of this album, there’s plenty of musical depth and light to be found throughout.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Mostly, Hug Of Thunder feels like a sign of maturity to complement a more weathered and warm approach to songwriting that includes a lot of electronic pulses and skybound singalongs.