Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 3,503 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 18% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 The Way I See It
Lowest review score: 0 Playing With Fire
Score distribution:
3503 music reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    30
    A surprisingly personal album that showcases how Adele has matured, both as an artist and as a person, since the middle of the last decade. She could have built on her blockbuster success in a cynical way, copy-and-pasting "Rolling in the Deep" and "Hello." Instead, she lets her emotions guide her, with triumphant results.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The pair are clearly having fun with their loverman shtick here — a knowing throwback to a more-cowbell era when all the cars were Monte Carlos, the lamps were lava, and #MeToo was but a distant, joy-killing dream. Mostly that comes through with an obvious wink; other times it lands somewhere between Pepé Le Pew and Ron Burgundy on the self-awareness scale.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Thank You is a powerful showcase for how good Ross is even after a two-decade absence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    That Santana can still impose his stamp on a solid handful of tracks is absolutely worth celebrating. That he's unable to grab the spotlight on the rest of Blessings and Miracles offers a hint of what he's sacrificed along the way.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Seven albums in, Carlile has long since proven herself constitutionally incapable of making a bad record. She's not about to start now.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Her debut album Remember Her Name, which is full of heartfelt songs that soar and shiver alongside Guyton's majestic vocal, is a full-spectrum showcase of her long-simmering talent.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    If the tone for most of the record's first half tips heavily toward 2 a.m. regrets and tempos that rarely rise above a broken heartbeat, the BPMs shift, however briefly, on "Breadwinner." With its tart warnings to steer clear of a meal-ticket man who "wants your shimmer/To make him feel bigger/Until he starts feeling insecure," the track feels like a buoyant callback to the chicken-fried wit of past standouts like "High Horse" and "Biscuits."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The new album is like watching the eighth season of a sitcom and growing hyper-aware of all the recycled jokes and actors' laugh lines.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Once again showcases her vulnerability, opening up old wounds from relationships with her father, a past lover, and, ultimately, herself. [Sep 2021, p.107]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Even amid all the worrying, their defiant, quivering music vibrates with possibility in a way that plainly and passionately refutes even the darkest moments of despair their lyrics express. [Sep 2021, p.107]
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There's a subdued quality to Solar Power that feels a lot like caution, or just self-protection — a deliberate retreat from the raw, unfiltered verve of her earlier output into the safer remove of a wry bystander more at ease with cool observation than confessional bloodletting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    The hooks are less immediately earworm-y than stomping When We All Fall anthems like "Bad Guy" or "Bury a Friend"; only rarely do the BPMs bump up high enough to transfer to the dance floor. Mostly, the beats are there to frame Eilish's singular voice: a smoky, silvery instrument that swoops and dips between vulnerability and bravado, jazz-bar bossa nova and confessional Gen Z poetry.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Pink Noise revels in the freedom of moving beyond stress for something peaceful, adding yet another layer to Mvula's already-rich tapestry of sound.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Fizzy and golden. ... A pop-star boss and player president of the Planet she's created, dictating her own laws of gravity.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Critic Score
    It isn't a slog, but it's closer in shape and spirit to the loose bloat of Culture II than the carefully sculpted gothic trap-pop opus Culture. Still, it is a satisfying listen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Even despite the weight of expectation, reinvention, and continuity, Wellness marks a fine new chapter for Tucker and Brownstein. It may even be one for Sleater-Kinney.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Revels in nervy song structures and unexpected instrumental touches even on its more straightforward tracks, such as the "Polyester Bride"-echoing "Good Side." The horns that rise up to accompany Phair's solidified sense of self on the slow-burning "Soul Sucker" give her inner journey a heroic feel, while her voice's airy upper register makes the plea at the heart of "Lonely St." even more potent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Sour doesn't try to be "the next" anyone; instead, Rodrigo distills her life and her listening habits into powerful, hooky pop that hints at an even brighter future.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    It often feels less like a distinct set of songs than a deliberate mood: a slow-rolling swagger through a bygone era, gilded by the band's own faithful imitations. That's bad news for hook-happy fans, maybe, but a living history lesson too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Where Anthem positioned Greta Van Fleet as an overqualified cover band in gestation, Battle gives brief glimpses of potential for a collective determined to graduate from Guitar Hero savants. What's hindered Greta Van Fleet's attempts at individualism is their penchant for thrash and bombast.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Where Soil embraced the discord of romantic entanglements, Deacon, its follow-up, is a celebration of the opposite: the comfort and assurance that swells from deep connection. [Apr 2021, p.73]
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Chemtrails is less a full transformation than the first step forward in another direction.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Justice happily expand its sonic palette with more textures and tempos.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Revelación proves that Gomez is up to the task — and a far more versatile musician than she's been given credit for.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Sia's previous triumphs have set a high standard, one that Music doesn't meet. Her "awesome" intentions aside, the album's messages of affirmation and encouragement may be well-meaning, but ultimately fall short while underlining Music's broader, damaging issues.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Flowers puts a lens on her weaker moments without any performative brightness. She simply lets her softer side shine. Gone are the animalistic vocals, replaced with a gentler tone that invokes a towering kindness and grace that pandemic-related solitude has allowed. ... She once again proves there is a fragile beauty that comes with facing the darkest parts of yourself, no matter how painful the process might be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The problem with OK Human isn't that Cuomo makes a facepalm-inducing Kim Jong-un reference and rhymes sad with bad, it's that there's not enough genuine pathos to outweigh the places where he can't help himself. Instead, the fleeting moments of authenticity are hidden beneath a pile of hokey one-liners, spotty vocal performances, and awkward arrangements that rely on the accompanying orchestra to provide all of the emotional depth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Swift's lyric-writing abilities feel leveled-up on Evermore, its characters drawn in pointillistic detail. ... Similarly, the musical risks on Evermore are bigger, both in scope and in payoff. ... Freedom from expectations has, both with this album and its predecessor, led to Swift's leaps giving new heights to her already-pretty-skyscraping career.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Like any contemporary Macca project, III feels like comfort food. Credit that voice, charming and unmistakable after decades of use. Hearing it anew is like curling up inside a warm blanket.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Nasty can be funny and furious, bratty and spectacularly off-the-wall. [Dec 2020, p.101]
    • Entertainment Weekly