New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 158 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Van Lear Rose
Lowest review score: 10 Charmbracelet
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 96 out of 158
  2. Negative: 22 out of 158
158 music reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Uh Huh Herb is a disappointment, the tepid, not-quite-there record that many artists seem to make after hitting a career peak.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Skinner’s finely honed sense of place still has a nearly hypnotic effect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Quarry doesn’t have great songs, just not-so-clever quips.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    A darkly compelling masterpiece that taps into the pitch-black id of Johnny Cash’s best records.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Musicology is a thrilling, electric statement by an artist who just might be building toward another creative peak.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Damita Jo, sadly, is an outdated product of the turn-of-the-millennium pop scene, in which female singers conflated sexual openness with empowerment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Endlessly pleasing (or trying to please), Feels Like Home dilutes even Jones’s brand of comfort-food jazz, grinding it down to something like a chewy gob of baby food.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You can’t help but get lost in Minogue’s music.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The songwriting is scattershot... and the sound strains for punk-on-a-budget but is as three-chord conservative as other retro acts like Rancid and the Distillers.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A sprawling and undisciplined mess... but it’s fully attuned to what made West so compelling in the first place, namely chunks of samples that feel raw and convey an underdog sensibility.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The carefully constructed sonics, though beautiful, can be so snoozily contemplative.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Tasty features predictable envy-inspiring flaunts of sex and cash, the album is good-hearted, too.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The note that truly dooms Diary is thematic, not musical. The disc collapses under the weight of one song about heartbreak after another.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Like the market-minded collaborations that run rampant on hip-hop records, Elliott’s range here feels like base-covering.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Once in a Lifetime shies away from the Talking Heads’ life force. It presents them as winking ironists, not the true black-music believers that they were.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Putting Naked together was likely satisfying for McCartney, but like a lot of inherently selfish artistic endeavors, it’s somewhat less rewarding for everyone else.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Pink pitches a brand of seriousness that is pure Lifetime-TV mawkishness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The central flaw of Room on Fire is the lack of hooks.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Wainwright’s powers of observation recall both Morrissey and Cole Porter.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unlike her recent work, Stumble Into Grace is made up solely of Harris’s work--love songs like “Can You Hear Me Now” that perfectly suit her voice, which is sweet and whispery yet never sentimental.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Speakerboxxx--by itself the album of the year--makes the failings of The Love Below all the more evident.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Clones testifies to how familiar (and hollow) the Neptunes’ studio tricks have become.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    Everything Must Go is a profound disappointment.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Hail to the Thief is overloaded with miraculous sounds.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Utterly raw and rocking.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    How the West Was Won proves that Led Zeppelin was nearly peerless in creating gigantic, thunderous rock.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album feels like a romp, with Thompson performing everything from delicate waltzes to roadhouse rock.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When you’re treated to such a powerful front woman, it seems almost unfair to complain about the lack of sophisticated sonics.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is stranger, thornier, and meaner than anything in the band’s past.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    What gives A Little Deeper its heft, though, is Dynamite’s voice: She can hold a word so long it almost floats in the air, and she purposefully embellishes her girlish, almost kewpie-doll-like whine to deliver her most stinging rebukes.