No Ripcord's Scores

  • Music
For 2,552 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Begone Dull Care
Lowest review score: 0 Famous First Words
Score distribution:
2552 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Stapleton’s writing is solid, but his vocals, arrangements, and instrumentation imbue most of these songs with something remarkable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Throughout these 11 songs, there’s a conflict between whether the characters are ready to move on or are fighting to go back to how it was.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Even at their blandest, and truthfully their dumbest, AC/DC make a compelling case why they're so good at this rock n' roll business. As it turns out, the secret is to stick to the formula until their dying day.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    For most of this album, Costello switches between percussive anxiety and odd ditties with ease.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While it starts strong, the weaker second half makes Serpentine Prison a mixed bag. It doesn’t feel like a definitive statement album, more like an opportunity for Berninger to stretch his legs. There’s a good amount of work to enjoy here, but it’ll mainly make you want to listen to The National instead.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Mountain Goats’ tamer approach, however, isn’t bullet-proof; some tracks simply get lost in the shuffle. The slow, sparse structure of The Last Place I Saw You Alive undercuts its poignant and introspective lyrics. Meanwhile, Pez Dorado, despite its decorative percussion, sounds too similar to the preceding Tidal Wave. Getting Into Knives does pick up by its final third, however, relying on more accessible rock tropes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a sharpening of the ideas introduced on Addiction to Blood, performed with clipping.’s classic graveness which only supports how scary this album can be.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though not quite the standout the band promises early on, it does end things on a mournful yet triumphant note. It caps off one of Pallbearer's most approachable statements to date, where they bring new life to their usual approach as they stick to their core sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While this is one of Springsteen’s most genuinely energetic and exciting releases in ages, it isn’t constantly uptempo.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even if the album's sonic template doesn't stray too far from his 2011 breakthrough debut LP Within You Without You, Greene chooses to keep the mood so light that it's practically inert.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The mood and the energy here is as catchy as it's ever been, even if the duo's clever, tightly-wound experiments sometimes come across as intriguing rather than complete.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a release of artfully constructed, seamlessly great indie-rock that could get easily passed by. Samia has the presence of someone effortlessly classy and commanding, which makes this project all the more appealing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s promising, but if it catches you in a bad mood, it might cause a headache.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The storytelling on display is just as sharp and compelling—even if, from a musical sense, Edwards could've expanded on her radio-friendly arrangements a little bit more.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On the surface, Haiku Hands is a party record, but dig deeper and it becomes a powerful testament to female friendship and the power you feel when you’re supported.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    They play to a more jangle-pop register on the bouncy Public Bodies before bringing back the fuzzy guitars and haunting tones on What We Do It For. The only throughline here is that the songs themselves are interesting indie-rock.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Is Ohms the return to form that meets expectations? Well, yes, even if the tunes haven't changed so much as the vastly-superior production has (with producer Terry Date back into the fold). But it also reinforces the fact that Deftones have stuck to a back-to-basics formula through all these years; the only difference now being that everyone else is taking notice.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A muted and detailed project that doesn’t feel like a grand statement or treatise—just a collection of lovely little songs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    By the end of closer Thirsty Tulips, it should be no wonder that Mattimore is signed to Ghostly International, a traditionally electronic music label. She makes ambient music better than the music that most ambient musicians are putting out these days.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Clearly, songs is the more developed album of the pairing here and one that those already under Lenker’s spell will treasure and contrast to her earlier work.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Keep It Flowers is an edgy, brash, and well put together statement that mostly goes down easy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These guys are still writing and playing at the top of their game, making another album that’s just as brutal as Stage Four, if not a little more palatable for everyday listening.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A beautiful and steady album about defying the roles others put you in and pondering what went wrong. It’s a heartbreaking project as well, peppered with upbeat but cutting songs. It may not be Loveless’s best album -- Real is impossible to beat -- but it ideally captures the indescribable greatness of her songwriting.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite Live Forever not being perfect, Bartees Strange swings for the fences on every song here. It’s exciting just to watch it unfold in front of your eyes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This latest offering from Fleet Foxes embodies their entire catalog of folksy sounds, seasons it with some jazzy elements, and pares down some bloat (only one track over five minutes). Perhaps the only surface flaw of this album is that certain songs build too quickly and fade too fast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    he annoying melodrama that made his rap material so exhausting is what gives his new music some real power. For the first time ever, the instrumentation suits Baker’s natural whine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Ascension bobs along in a meandering sea of drum machine and synth pads, waiting for something to latch on to. It never takes long; Stevens has the ideas and they hit relentlessly, moving on and doubling over before you’ve had half a chance to process them.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    For the most part on Carefree Theatre, you’re stuck with hazy textures (In My Mind) and stilted grooves (Carefree Theatre) that are simply boring.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    No gripes here as IDLES deliver their most consistent album to date with a handful of their most rough-cut diamonds sparkling through.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Universal Want's strengths lie in a series of inspired moments rather than it coming together as a satisfying whole.