Slant Magazine's Scores

For 3,139 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 62% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Dear Science,
Lowest review score: 0 Fireflies
Score distribution:
3139 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Vol. 2’s braggadocio is countered by the enthusiasm that Curry and his roster of guests bring to the album. Having long since proven his skill as a lyricist, Curry is more concerned with having a good time here. And that also makes for a hell of a good listen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The extended solo that closes the song drips with the heartache that courses through the rest of the songs. In the end, Passage du Desir serenity belies an intense human longing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The way Clairo’s voice glides over the grooves on Charm makes it all feel effortless, especially compared to the virtuosic performances around her. That effortlessness is not just the result of the creative alignment of the myriad musicians involved, but the clear vision of the artist at the helm.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    My Light, My Destroyer, is the zippiest rocker she’s penned to date, but her whispercore vocals—so pitch-perfect on the album’s opener, the hazy morning reverie that is “Devotion”—clash with the song’s jagged electric guitars and chugging rhythm. Fortunately, this is an anomaly on an album in which Jenkins’s voice typically melts seamlessly into the subtle, vast sonic tapestry.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While some of the power of How Will I Live Without a Body? comes from its obliqueness, Loma manages to locate a middle ground between embracing one’s darker emotions and finding a way out of them.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    This is DiFranco’s first album in over a decade to feature a co-producer, BJ Burton, and the result is her most musically varied set in years.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dopamine is a reflection of who Normani is as an artist at this particular moment in time, and it reinforces the notion that there is indeed value in taking one’s time in order to deliver something of substance.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Poptical Illusion embodies his curiosity, drive, and desire to explore uncharted territory, while offering wisdom that can only be attributed to his age. Cale doesn’t seem to care about relevancy. He’s just looking to continue growing.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At her best, which is more often than not, Aurora’s literal and figurative voice is uniquely her own. “Learn my body and my poems/And repeat them like you own them,” she offers on “Dreams.” It’s this sense of poetry that keeps What Happened to the Heart? from feeling pedantic. But most of all, it’s her ability to locate the big, beating heart inside the machine.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Brat is undeniably bratty and brash, it’s also frequently vulnerable. .... Charli’s exploration of her priorities isn’t merely slapped atop catchy club beats though. Her ambivalence is in direct conversation with the music itself.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    While it lacks the cohesion and tenderness of Lei Line Eon, Tidal Memory Exo largely finds Malliagh confidently carving out his own identity as an electronic music innovator.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At times, the simplicity of Khan’s lyrics can leave songs like “At Your Feet” feeling too thinly sketched. .... And yet, there’s a tangible undercurrent of impending grief that ripples beneath the surface of the album’s tracks that is, perhaps, reflective of the inherent heartbreak of parenthood.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dark Times plays like a musical memoir, even if not all of its stories are entirely autobiographical. For a rapper who’s always leaned toward a cynical perspective, Staples shines when he leans into the struggle, using his experience as both an example and a cautionary tale.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Packed with multipart songs and self-referential lyrics that reward repeat listens, the album is a world unto itself—and the most fully realized version of Eilish’s sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lives Outgrown presents an artist whose capabilities have been sharply honed, with the skill to convey all of life’s complicated, thorny emotions.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Cook’s career is defined by one thing, it’s pushing the boundaries of the genre to their limits. With that in mind, Britpop is some kind of culmination of that effort, challenging the listener’s assumptions about what pop is, and offering an exciting glimpse of what it could be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite their short runtimes, though, many of these songs still pack an undeniable punch, thanks in large part to Parker and Harle’s meticulous production.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Unusual musical choices, like the inclusion of glockenspiel on “Denon,” create some sonic interest. More than anything, though, Camera Obscura excels at generating a mood and a sense of warmth. If they stick too closely to familiar sonic territory on Look to the East, Look to the West, it is, at least, one that they’ve mastered.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Forgiveness Is Yours, Saoudi and company achieve that objective—with a patina of sophistication.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though Fu##in’ Up maintains the same track sequence as Ragged Glory, the titles have changed, each borrowing a lyric from the songs themselves. And when the album does deviate musically from its source material, it does so with subtlety and purpose.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album finds Clark at her most fragile and ferocious, seeking beauty among the waste and wreckage of 21st-century life. Itself a beautifully ugly thing, All Born Screaming is a visceral examination of art and nature when both are pushed to the brink.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Tortured Poets Department plays out as a pop album that sounds fine enough but sure is long-winded.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s 10 brisk, lightly rocking songs evoke the radio-friendly pop-rock of early-2000s Sheryl Crow or Jewel while sometimes, as on the title track, looking further back to ’70s soft rock a la Carole King.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Only God Was Above Us is ultimately just another (very good) Vampire Weekend album rather than a radical shift. It essentially sees the band dressing up their patented medium-paced, occasionally frantic, symphonic rock in see-through disguises.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an album of Americana not in the banal, produced-by-Dave Cobb sense, but in the truest senses of narrative and musical form.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mixing R&B and electronica isn’t uncommon in pop music today, but For Your Consideration boasts an unusual combination of production polish and musical eccentricity, harking back to Björk’s early solo albums and Timbaland’s work with Aaliyah.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The way Crutchfield’s crystalline voice penetrates her music’s often beautiful, serene instrumentation on Tigers Blood dovetails with her gutting truth-telling.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With Bright Future, Lenker stands on the confidence of her talent, complemented by production choices that neither distract nor detract from the emotion of her songwriting.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    WWW may be a candid and sophisticated analysis of the dark side of fame, but it’s also eminently entertaining and occasionally funny, and it (re)establishes Whack as one of the most creative rappers in the game.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    But if the album’s unwaveringly restrained instrumentation holds it back from ranking alongside Musgraves’s best work, it’s still a welcome shift away from the country pop of 2018’s Golden Hour.