The Guardian's Scores

For 5,034 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 There is No Other
Lowest review score: 10 Unpredictable
Score distribution:
5034 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In many ways, the ballad-free, dancefloor-primed Chromatica represents not only Gaga’s most personal record, but her most straightforward.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It makes Notes on a Conditional Form a curious thing, an album whose flaws are inherent in what it sets out to do: music for the no-filter generation, with all the good and bad that entails.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The overriding impression of both modes is nostalgia, not least for the uplifting, utopian properties of dance music. Moby finds some traction on the first count – there is vitality here, if not novelty – but the forays into politics aren’t so convincing.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Whatever he’s doing, the results are uniformly fantastic: rich, fascinating and moving, packed with gorgeous melodies and arrangements that feel alive, constantly writhing into unexpected new shapes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Alternating on lead, the pair’s vocals remain a model of sibling harmony, while the interplay between Sean’s intricate guitar picking and Sara’s elegant fiddle is similarly impressive – the breakneck bluegrass instrumental Bella and Ivan is a case in point. Mostly, however, the mood is reflective.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There are fleeting, faraway echoes of John Martyn at his wooziest, but Mills has crafted something very personal and individual.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Walking with impressive confidence along the line that separates commercialism from experimentation, It Was Good Until It Wasn’t doesn’t need an accompanying soap opera to sell it, but it’s got one anyway.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The songs are simple but sturdy – the hooks are strong and grip even when you think you’ve escaped them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Sometimes it sounds atmospheric – on From Florida With Love, producer MexikoDro constructs a spectral, impressively abstract backing track out of tape hiss and distortion – but a lot of the time it just sounds like a noncommittal shrug: tracks come and go without leaving much of a sonic impression.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Neither balls-out, show-me-the-money capitulation to market forces, nor boldly experimental enough to count as a disruption to a mainstream form; neither disaster nor triumph. There’s something scattered and awkward about its grafting together of ideas that don’t gel; the sound of a band who have outgrown their initial incarnation but aren’t quite sure what they want now.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He uses his widest range of sound yet but maintains focus by resisting, as he always has done, the inclusion of vocals or drums. This is one of the great and joyous paradoxes of his music, which is still intensely percussive – synths are planed down and combined into hard bolts of sound that have the rhythmic strength of a drum machine – but freed from the shackles of looped drum patterns.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This album is a masterpiece.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cohesive and seamless, Mas Amable reaches the heart of the rhythm and the soul of the drum, aspiring to a meditative quality and tranquility that almost feels sacred.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Earth, for all its ambition, will mainly be of interest to Radiohead completists, who are now just missing the bassist: over to you, Colin Greenwood.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The result is that this seems not so much an album as a sudden glorious eruption; after eight long years, an urgent desire to be heard.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite the stumbles, it’s this willingness to switch things up and the ambition of scale in The Don of Diamond Dreams that prove Shabazz Palaces to be such a fascinating and exciting project in the age of algorithms and formulae.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It is precisely this sometimes kitsch mix of genres that makes Mergia’s music so endearing and uplifting. His right hand on a melody is unmistakable, and on Yene Mircha he lives up to its title, carving out a thoroughly idiosyncratic perspective.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The New Abnormal proves that when they put their minds to it, that old magic is still well within the Strokes’s grasp.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a highly polished piece of work, big on rich string arrangements and intricate harmony vocals.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a distinctive, sharp record that only these three UK voices could have made.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Mostly, though, Lee counterbalances her darker experiments with playfulness and hope. Her genre-fluidity creates moments of unexpected beauty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tops are now up there with Phoenix as the masters of modern soft rock – just don’t go changing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    After 10 albums it’s hard to surprise, and Ward isn’t the first artist with a distinct style to encounter that issue.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The excitement of Heaven to a Tortured Mind lies in the uncertainty it engenders in the listener, the feeling that you’re never sure what’s about to happen next. That’s a rare sensation in a predictable musical landscape. In the best sense of the phrase, Yves Tumor is off in a world of their own.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A remarkable, shamanic talent.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It may not be great art, but it is exhilarating, cheerily undemanding fun, something in scant supply at the moment.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What songs these are, genuinely good enough to be compared with peak Dylan: like him, Crutchfield is adept at nestling into the almost comforting niche of heartache and hopping out again with a grin.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her one-off impulse to Make A Statement is the only predictable 2020 pop move on an otherwise outlandishly great second album.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Almost 30 years into a career you would once have put money on ending within five, Gigaton suggests Pearl Jam might still be around long after Trump is a distant memory.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It is an ambitious album that can turn from hedonism to hope on a dime. And with its genre-hopping ethos, bold orchestral choices and pleasing tunefulness, it is the first truly boundary-pushing record of the 2020s, cementing its creator as a daring virtuoso.