Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,329 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Shadows in the Night
Lowest review score: 25 Authentic
Score distribution:
1,329 music reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The duo's taller half, Ronnie Dunn, was long regarded as the more distinctive singer, and on his solo debut, there's no more sharing of the spotlight to hold him back. That's about the only difference between a Brooks & Dunn record and this similarly hit-and-miss collection of odes to blue-collar empathy, patriotism and the transformative power of love.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Mostly, though, Blown Away finds her using her remarkable voice to deliver feel-good bromides.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album is a pointedly minimal production, though -- most tracks are simple guitar-bass-drum affairs with a few tasteful harmonies that put the surprisingly durable hooks up front.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The singer cuts loose only as '8th Wonder' winds down, building to the kind of fury that causes one to wonder what this album could've been with less polish and a lot more Ditto, unfiltered.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The third studio album from Major Lazer, Diplo's project inspired by Jamaican dancehall music, features a few hot tracks and a few so tepid that we need reminders about what made Diplo interesting in the first place.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The characteristically festive result is generous to a fault: Collins triggers warm memories but leaves us with only a shallow sense of how precisely his four decades in the business have affected him as a man.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The challenge in coming back for Round 2 was to make it more than a one-note joke, but the Darkness remains in its Spinal Tap mode for most of "One Way Ticket." [6 Dec 2005]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's all familiar stuff - too familiar - to warrant sustained attention.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Snoop and Wiz make a sweet couple, but this lightweight trifle is unlikely to cement a committed relationship.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Klaxons, if you're going to shout in our ears a bunch, can you at least have something to say?
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is pop music, and it's all in good fun.... I just wish the recipe would have included a touch more poetry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The 16 songs vary in tone, from grease-and-nicotine-stained jams to spit-shined ballads, but too little of it is adroit enough in construction or execution to stick in the craw.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It rarely puts the original material in a new light or reveals much about songs that were already close to perfect.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's unclear whether the creative languor stems from the inherent commercial pressure of being the Young Money meal ticket or whether Wayne has exhausted his ideas after compressing a career's worth of songs into three years.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A competent but very late-adopted pop-trance slurry.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Toning down the sonic drama creates an appealing intimacy, but an hour's worth of blues- and folk-flavored ballads becomes monotonous.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    However well-crafted and hummable it is, Exhibitionists is hardly groundbreaking. Each song feels borrowed rather than handmade.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    That spitfire spirit carries over into the most electrifying moments of Just Like You, a batch of tuff-girl tunes for the torn-fishnets set, but too much of it sounds impermanent, like so much Manic Panic rinsing down the drain.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A sense that his musical vision hasn't stalled in 1978 might add some urgency. Some kind of retooling might also help with his larger problem: trying to do the same job with old equipment. [11 Sep 2006]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album should keep him atop the country commercial firmament, but doesn't really advance him as an artist.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Once you get past the surface attractions, Sam Endicott's arch singing and rock-rebel posturing are forced, and his production is as stiff as the mechanical discoid rhythms. [24 Apr 2005]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly every song overstays its welcome; what may have felt like a bunch of great jams in the studio grows tedious over the course of 12 tracks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As meticulously as these sounds and instruments are recorded, as beautiful and haunting as they sometimes sound, they don't add up to more than one or two truly memorable songs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Chesney's tone-deafness here seems especially egregious because it's surrounded by better, smarter material.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's all very fun and creative, but, ironically, the duo fall into the common hip-hop traps of being short on actual hooks and not knowing when to edit themselves. [15 Dec 2004]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It may not be fair to rag on the group for picking the wrong decade to rip off, but right now Kasabian's allegiance to the '90s sounds especially uninspired.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All that star power can leave little room in these futuristic R&B songs for Hilson, whose sturdy but unremarkable voice rarely transcends its role as a melody-delivery device.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    One just wishes the band did it with a bit more grace and inventiveness than on Appeal to Reason, where straight-outta-the Nation song titles like 'Collapse (Post-Amerika)' and 'Re-education (Through Labor)' disguise some pretty conservative ideas about how modern mainstream punk should sound.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    She's sounding as genre-bound in her way as the synthetic singers she was supposed to be a relief from.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    At 16 tracks, though, Fifty Shades of Grey is a bit of a slog, with too many dreary midtempo numbers--by Sia, Laura Welsh and Skylar Grey--that only feel more glazed (and less enticing) the longer you listen.