Boston Globe's Scores

For 2,088 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Masseduction
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
2088 music reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For those on the lookout for alternatives to what currently passes for country music, Midwest Farmer’s Daughter is the latest reason to cheer.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Regardless of the constantly evolving mood, RJ finds new ways to surprise and engage your ears.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Zayn sounds tentative when he’s venturing into lyrical territory beyond his former band’s purview, which compromises the album’s clearly wide-ranging aims.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An unusual but rewarding album.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    [A] solid, surprising set.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This confident new album is among his finest works, a terrific showcase for his finely honed, deeply humane songcraft.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a stark, sinewy affair that foregrounds the punk-rock lifer’s voice, a finely weathered instrument, all knowing vibrato and bemused sneering.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Divorcing the music from its maker and inspirations can pose varying degrees of difficulty. But listeners who can imprint themselves on these songs will find much to enjoy in Stefani’s Truth.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It all sounds compellingly real; guitarist Adam Dutkiewicz adds brain-splitting riffs, and the rhythm section of Mike D’Antonio and Justin Foley locks it down hard.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    There’s a tremendous amount of preserved intimacy on these unearthed first studio recordings.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, in fact, the music on Good Grief isn’t as expansive as was “Wildewoman.” But it still comes across that way thanks to Wolfe and Laessig, who infuse their performances with a joy that’s almost unfettered, even when wallowing in pits of sorrow.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eraser Stargazer is exactly the sort of album that pushes a local scene to be greater.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Through 13 glorious tracks spanning back-porch hootenanny sessions to countrypolitan elegance, Lynn proves that at 83 she’s a national treasure who still exudes the earthiness of her rural roots.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a way, it’s all as tightly woven as his Grammy-winning work, even if none of these cuts fit that album’s meticulous narrative.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LaMontagne plays exquisite lead guitar throughout, backed by James on celestial harmonies that boost the psychedelic mood even higher. The resulting album is soothing therapy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    iii
    The architecture of these layered slices of electro-pop is transparent, but the songs never offer more than surface pleasures.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her new album builds on that idea [multi-hyphenate] in a thrilling way, taking the experimental ideals that she learned as a student of jazz into new directions--heady funk, tongue-twisting soul, sparsely arranged confessional --that consistently surprise.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like her heroes before her, B.B. King included, Raitt is clearly in it for the long haul, and not content to rely on past glory. Instead, she wisely digs Deep and her listeners are the better for it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Her third album blends styles in a way that thrillingly recalls the kitchen-sink endeavors of the early new wave era.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The group’s sound has progressed to include ethereal synths, suited to the spiritual subject matter. Deheza’s soothing, breathy voice sits atop this sound as if she’s trying to comfort Curtis about their relationship in songs like “Open Your Eyes” and “On My Heart,” and about his cancer diagnosis in “Confusion.” This album highlights a connection between the two that goes beyond death.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Well intentioned but frequently clumsy (“I want to be Hugh Jackman/ you know jacked, man”), the record demonstrates that the duo’s skills haven’t yet caught up to their ambition.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Mostly, though, Victorious simply colors within the lines drawn by others, scratching the itch of those already inclined to seek it out.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Side Pony is a confident, expertly played statement from a band that’s been honing its approach for more than a decade, and it clearly shows that Lake Street Dive is ready to make itself known to whatever audiences have yet to succumb to its many charms.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album feels stunningly fresh and cutting edge; expect to see it on some Top Ten lists later this year.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Simple and understated, Pinegrove grafts unassuming banjo and pedal-steel textures to classic slacker indie rock, making each moment as engaging as the next.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As a songwriter, she continues to have a feel for big, hooky choruses (“Don’t You Give Up on Me”), as well as a tendency to go too broad (“Daughters”). The most sharply etched songs, like “Go for a Walk” (“I want to feel my life”), reveal a singer finding herself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It’s a hard album to dislike, and an equally hard one to love.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a pleasure to report that country music’s ultimate good guy has once again crafted an excellent collection of new music with his 18th album.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Tracks like “Death Came,” “Dust,” and “Bitter Memory” have great lyrics, yet the clear conclusion is that Williams should’ve condensed her second self-released double-disc set since 2014 into one record--two is just too much.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The buoyancy at the center of the open-road-ready “Dopamine,” subtly urgent “Yr Not Far,” and chiming “Loose Ends” makes the 17 tracks drift by like a breeze on a particularly carefree spring day.