Boston Globe's Scores

For 2,088 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Masseduction
Lowest review score: 10 Lulu
Score distribution:
2088 music reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The record alternates between Crazy Horse-style rockers and gentle acoustic folk, though as always Young throws a few curveballs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The shimmering War & Leisure, the singer’s fourth LP, finds him operating in a similarly creative groove [as on 2015's Wildheart] but tamping down wolfish eroticism in favor of breezier, tropical vibes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The music draws on two decades of musicianship to showcase the indie veterans’ trademark versatility. Anthemic “We Were Beautiful” melds euphoric horns with programmed drum machines; elsewhere, “The Girl Doesn’t Get It” floats its lyrics across a sea of synths. Best of all is delicate opener “Sweet Dew Lee,” on which Stuart Murdoch’s honeyed delivery posits him as the missing link between Simon and Garfunkel.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s a short, casual release, so much so that it’s easy to miss just how expertly crafted these songs are.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Taken as a whole, Songs of Experience isn’t a bad U2 album--just an uneven one. For every dull rehash of past glories, there’s something like the slinky Zombies pastiche “Summer of Love” to restore one’s faith that U2’s well of inspiration hasn’t gone entirely dry.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Utopia is both resolutely avant-garde and absolutely beautiful, a combination those who associate experimental music with dissonance and ugliness will find utterly paradoxical.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    We have Low in High School, which is sometimes brilliant, sometimes infuriating, and 100  percent Morrissey.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    From a purely musical standpoint, it’s a pretty good album--even when she’s throwing this many ideas against the wall, Swift is too talented a songwriter to miss her target more than a few times per record.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Dusk in Us is, then, a 44-minute master class in wielding extreme art toward human ends, using hardcore’s berating heft as a foundation for dirging experimentalism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Meaning of Life has few weak links, unfolding instead as an album-long emancipation for one of our best female vocalists, released from pesky contractual obligations and channeling her delight at that newfound freedom into songs that, while signaling a new stage in her career, appear to flow directly from both heart and soul.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Aching, vulnerable, and unsparing in detail, her creations invite you to listen with your whole self and feel along.
    • 99 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Decisively unmodern yet not quite retro, The Queen Is Dead sounds every bit as ineffably marvelous now as it must have in 1986, and this reissue is as good an excuse as any to let it charm us all over again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If Beck is Generation X’s answer to David Bowie, then “Colors” is his “Let’s Dance”: an intentionally lightweight, enjoyable mid-career effort with one eye on the dance floor and one on radio playlists. Whether it returns him to his former hitmaker status remains to be seen, but “Colors” definitely succeeds in putting the spring back in Beck’s step.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It’s a jittering, coruscating sucker punch of an album--and St. Vincent’s first bona fide masterpiece.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    At a svelte 10 songs and 47½ minutes, Heaven Upside Down is the shortest Marilyn Manson album yet, avoiding the overstuffed redundancy of past efforts. No one expected this band to be doing some of its best work 20 years after it first shook up the zeitgeist, but here it is, continuing to evolve while toning down its more dated or cartoonish aspects.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Even now, more than four decades after being recorded, it still catches your ear as one of the most wholly original sounds in pop music.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The knock on them has always been that their albums surround great singles with skip-able filler, but this time out they’ve put together a relatively tight, cohesive record. It’s not without its flaws, but Wonderful Wonderful still might be the best Killers album yet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 the rare double helping that doesn’t feel excessive or bloated. They’ve got the tunes; whether they’re acoustic or electric is beside the point.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 the rare double helping that doesn’t feel excessive or bloated. They’ve got the tunes; whether they’re acoustic or electric is beside the point.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There may not be any moments of dramatic catharsis to compete with “Sea of Love” or “Mr. November,” but the band’s gift for slow, sad beauties (“Nobody Else Will Be There,” “Carin at the Liquor Store”) remains undiminished. Even as they tinker with their style, The National can’t help but sound like themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Full of irresistible grooves, quotable lyrics, and moments of spine-tingling beauty, American Dream is a worthy addition to the LCD Soundsystem discography.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Put some headphones on, find a good window to stare out of, and let time stretch to the horizon; A Deeper Understanding will reward your patience.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    It leaves you yearning for an album that would have expanded the mature melodicism of those three tracks [“Electric Blue,” “Put Your Money on Me” and “We Don’t Deserve Love”]. Instead, their presence magnifies the smarmy, sophomoric awfulness of everything else here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    I Can Spin a Rainbow finds her bouncing ideas off of the Legendary Pink Dots’ Edward Ka-Spel, whose aggressively experimental approach to what a song can entail is so specific and unyielding that the album forces her into new modes.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Some of the band’s unique flavor still remains, as in the collaboration between Albarn, Pusha T, and Mavis Staples on “Let Me Out,” an unlikely match that wonderfully locks together. But without a unified sound or story to focus on, the album sometimes falls into the modern sinkhole of too many options presented at once.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album is a 55-minute blitz of thumping beats and head-spinning rhymes that blur by you before you have a chance to process them.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album rooted in the low end of the emotional spectrum is a risk, but through fastidious instrumental detailing and lyrics that evince sympathy even when they’re at their most cutting, Mann crafts a melancholic atmosphere that is worth repeated listens, whether as a means for catharsis or as a well-crafted cloud to ease the punishing brightness of a too-sunny day.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Terminology aside, it’s a sprawling, star-studded release, and an impressive achievement--one that signals a new level of ambition for Drake.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Lips return with a moody, industrial, and hypnotic CD that’s probably what Major Tom would be listening to, sitting in his tin can.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    11 Short Stories finds the band serving up pint after pint of a familiar brew--the heady blend of fist-pumping anthems, traditional Irish instrumentation, and scrappy, blue-collar grit that’s made them a household name--while using their distilled strengths to break fresh ground.