Spin's Scores

  • Music
For 4,152 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Phantom Power
Lowest review score: 0 They Were Wrong, So We Drowned
Score distribution:
4152 music reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These are passive recollections that come off as quietly rebellious, because he plainly acknowledges the value of the black voice, as well as the weight of its silence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Grohl and his pals never set out to write the gospel on modern rock--they only sought to preach it, hammering it into our heads by way of biting hooks and anthemic melodies. There’s more than enough red meat to go around on Concrete and Gold, the band’s ninth album.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The diversity of the players is reflected in the sprawling songs, many of feel like patchworks.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On the good side, there’s the spacey disco-funk of “Palace of the Governors” and “Begin Countdown.” Describing Deerhoof songs frequently forces you to invent delirious fictional bands to compare them to; the latter of these two sounds like the Meters as covered by an ensemble of Teletubbies. On a handful of songs that litter the album’s second half, however–”Sea Moves,” “Singalong Junk,” “Kokoye”--the band searches at its borders for a new sound to bring back and doesn’t find anything very interesting.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A decade-plus of refining this particular sound has led to the purposeful pop of Okovi, her sixth album. Danilova’s vocal performance momentarily recalls darker and more secretive Sia songs.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The libretto and effects boards on Sleep Well Beast may signal doom, but the replenished energy in the music feels life-affirming. Somehow, the most despondent album they’ve ever made still sounds like a celebration.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    An album that’s fundamentally modest, even as it stretches to be both looser and more technically ambitious.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    You certainly won’t find a clunker among Hitchhiker’s more familiar cuts, though few of them surpass the official versions. ... Young’s talent is vast and his art contains plenty of contradictions. Hitchhiker stands as proof that no matter how strange his creations might sometimes seem, he always draws them from the same well.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    American Dream is good enough to dispel all of those concerns. The passing of their imperial phase has left them like any formerly Teflon hipster: honest, and ready to move on from whatever they found at the heart of the party. Admitting for real that they’d lost their edge is one of the most interesting things they could’ve done, and hopefully they keep making more records after this one.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A workmanlike pop album, vocally immaculate and sonically au courant, but seldom more than functional.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A Deeper Understanding feels like the ideal War on Drugs album--the one where the songs are the strongest and the instruments the most uniquely cathartic, and with a mist that gives it all an alluringly blinding sheen.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A stunning, sprawling sucker-punch of a finale equally amenable to die-hards and newcomers, Science Fiction is a worthy (if bittersweet) send-off to one of the most brutally honest, forward-thinking rock bands of the new millennium.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though Villains is a perfectly solid, occasionally bloated QOTSA album, it’s the first to really feel like a missed opportunity.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Throughout the record, words are just pathways through which the melody travels from one sweep to the next, but nothing really comes into focus except an almost free-floating regret and confusion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rainbow is a document of Kesha coming into her own, blossoming into the artist she’s always truly wanted to become.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Cost of Living outpaces its predecessor in large because of Downtown Boys’ newfound mastery of dynamics in their performances.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 30 Critic Score
    The sourness of their newfound perspective might be one thing if the music sounded any good, but doesn’t. Arcade Fire have re-committed to running away from their once sky-scraping stadium sound, further experimenting with the island sounds and disco grooves that bloated 2013’s Reflektor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though the album’s lyrics are occasionally vague, the moments of specificity induce raised eyebrows.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Lust for Life is a spectacular 72 minutes long. It trades in the same intently, atmospherically narcotic sound Del Rey and primary producer Rick Nowels have favored since the beginning.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At its best moments, the EP is experimental and detail-oriented. At its worst, it sounds like an empty pastiche of ideas drawn from a time-tested deck of Reznor-patented Oblique Strategies. ... If consistent, headline-grabbing smaller releases are the way to keep music fans listening and interested in Nine Inch Nails, then keep them coming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though it lacks the electrifying newness of the Sung Tongs era, Eucalyptus is nonetheless a success. It is a patient, reflective, and decidedly low-key work, one that seems content to thrum along in its own corner of the universe without much regard for whether anyone’s there to receive its generous gifts.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Even at roughly the same length as past Waxhatchee albums, Storm feels more compact. The second half sags briefly between the undifferentiated buzz of “Hear You” and delicate breathiness of “A Little More,” but in the final stretch, the band pulls through.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Jealous Machines tends in a darker, more modernist direction. On Lese Majesty, Shabazz Palaces leaned towards the indulgent, with a scattershot track sequence that was heavy on under-developed ideas bordering on interludes. This time, Butler and Maraire tighten their focus even as they serve up twice as much music.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As you work your way through the new material, it becomes apparent rather quickly that Shabazz Palaces have elevated their jazz-damaged phrasing into a unique musical language. Butler, of course, responds to the music with idiosyncratic lyrics to match. ... Gangster Star leans towards a funkier, more upbeat mood.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Issa Album needn’t be The Infamous, but it could’ve benefitted from a clearer and tighter direction.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Awesome the riffs may be, one might only want to hear them in small bursts lest they risk being worn out. Still, there’s enough variation to stave off sameness, and the band is smart enough to switch it up from track-to-track.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The band is smart, then, to play to their strengths on Something to Tell You: experiments at small scale.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hug of Thunder is at its best when Broken Social Scene is loose and willing to experiment with its formula.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    TLC
    Expectations for a crowdfunded album should be naturally tempered, and yet it’s hard to ignore that none of the songs on TLC present an engaging point of view as smoothly or with as much brass as the group’s biggest hits, “Waterfalls” or “Creep.”
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For an artist never exactly afraid of taking risks, Dust still finds new forms of experimentation, moving beyond dance toward something softer and more reflective. Halo juggles new elements with gorgeous sparseness that gives weight to each sonic addition.